Wednesday, 10 August 2011

SYLLABI AND COURSES OF READING FOR THE DEGREE OF M.Ed.GENERAL SEMESTER SYSTEM OF PUNJAB UNIVERSITY, CHANDIGARH

ONE YEAR REGULAR COURSE SEMESTER SYSTEM
GENERAL OBJECTIVES:
To prepare students as Teacher Educators, Administrators and Researchers for various institutions
engaged in Teaching Educational Research and Educational Planning.
ELIGIBILITY:
A candidate who has passed B.Ed Exam of this University or any other university recognized as
equivalent shall be eligible to apply for the course, provided he/she has secured at least 55% of the
marks in aggregate. In the case of SC/ST students, this percentage of marks shall be at least 50%,
subject to revision by the university from time to time.
Intake for the course shall be guided by N.C.T.E. norms and PU rules from time to time.
ATTENDANCE:
75% attendance is compulsory separately in semester-I and semester-II.
COURSE OUTLINE:

SEMESTER-I
Total Marks External Internal Practical’s
Theory Assessment
I) Foundation Papers:
1) Foundations of Education 100 80 20 --
(Philosophical) -I
2) Advanced Educational 100 60 20 20
Psychology-I
3) Methodology of Educational 100 80 20 --
Research and Educational Statistics-I
II) Options: (Papers IV, V and VI)
Any three of the following:-
Total Marks External Internal Practical’s
Theory Assessment
a) Guidance & 100 60 20 20
Counselling-I
b) Adult, Continuing & 100 60 20 20
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Life Long Education-I
c) Value Education & 100 80 20 -
Human Rights -I
d) Comparative 100 80 20 -
Education-I
e) Teacher 100 80 20 -
Education-I
f) Special 100 60 20 20
Education-I
g) Educational 100 60 20 20
Technology-I
h) Measurement 100 80 20 -
& Evaluation-I
i) Curriculum 100 60 20 20
Development-I
j) Environmental 100 60 20 20
Education-I
k) Yoga Education-I 100 60 20 20
l) Educational 100 80 20 -
Administration & Management I
m) Dissertation Proposal - - - -
Aggregate of Semester-I
i) For those who do not opt for dissertation – 100 x 6= 600
ii) For those who opt for dissertation – 100x 5=500
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SEMESTER-II
Total Marks External Internal Practical’s
Theory Assessment
I) Foundation Papers:
1) Foundations 100 80 20 --
Of Education (Sociological) -II
2) Advanced Educational 100 60 20 20
Psychology-II
3) Methodology of Educational 100 80 20 --
Research and Educational Statistics-II
II) Options: (Papers IV, V and VI)
Any three of the following:-
Total Marks External Internal Practical’s
Theory Assessment
a) Guidance & 100 60 20 20
Counselling-II
b) Adult, Continuing & 100 60 20 20
Life Long Education-II
c) Value Education & 100 80 20 -
Human Rights -II
d) Comparative 100 80 20 -
Education-II
e) Teacher 100 80 20 -
Education-II
f) Special 100 60 20 20
Education-II
g) Educational 100 60 20 20
Technology-II
h) Measurement 100 80 20 -
& Evaluation-II
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i) Curriculum 100 60 20 20
Development-II
j) Environmental 100 60 20 20
Education-II
k) Yoga Education-I 100 60 20 20
l) Educational 100 80 20 -
Administration & Management I
M) Dissertation 200 150 50 -
submission and viva voce
Aggregate of Semester-II
i) For those who do not opt for dissertation – 100 x 6= 600
ii) For those who opt for dissertation – 100x 5=500+200=700
Grand Total
Semester-I + Semester-II
i) For those who do not opt for dissertation 600+ 600=1200
ii) For those who opt for dissertation 500+700=1200
EVALUATION:
The following are the guidelines, mode of testing and evaluation including Continuous Internal
Assessment of students:
1)
i. Terminal Evaluation : 80%
ii. Continuous Assessment : 20%
iii. Continuous Assessment may include written assignment, snap tests, participation in
discussion in the class, term papers, attendance etc.
iv. In order to incorporate an element of Continuous Internal Assessment of students, the
Colleges/Departments will conduct one written test and one snap test as quantified below:
1. Written Test : 50 marks
2. Snap Test : 15 marks
3. Participation in Class discussion : 10 marks
4. Term Paper : 15 marks
5. Attendance : 10 marks
Total : 100 (reduced to 20)
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2) Weight age of 2 marks for attendance component out of 20 marks for Continuous Assessment
shall be available only to those students who attend 75% and more of classroom lectures. The breakup
of marks for attendance component for theory papers shall be as under:
Attendance Component Marks for Theory Papers
a) 75% and above up to 85% 1
b) Above 85% 2
Practicals:-
All practical will be jointly evaluated by external and internal examiners.
Examination duration of the paper will be of three hours.
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SEMESTER-I
1) Foundation Papers:
PAPER-I FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (PHILOSOPHICAL) -I
Total marks 100
External Theory 80
Internal Assessment 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: The syllabus has been designed in order to:
• sensitize the students regarding the ultimate questions of life and the role of philosophy in this
regard.
• help the students in understanding the intimate relationship between education and
philosophy.
• expose the students to the methodology of philosophical analysis for solving the perennial
problems of education.
• enable students to understand the educational implications of some schools of philosophy in
western thought.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all, two from each unit and one question( question no.9)
covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
a) Relationship of education and philosophy- educational philosophy and philosophy of
education.
b) Epistemology and Education : Knowledge; methods of acquiring valid knowledge with
special reference to positivist and constructivist approach.
c) National values as enshrined in the Indian Constitution and their educational implications.
UNIT-II
Western schools of philosophy with special reference to concept of reality, knowledge, values and
their educational implications.
a) Realism
b) Existentialism
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UNIT-III
Indian schools of philosophy and their influence in the field of education,
a) Sankhya-Yoga
b) Vedanta
UNIT-IV
Educational Thinkers and their contribution to the field of education.
a) J. Krishnamurthy
b) William Heard Kilpatrick
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Park, J(1961): The Philosophy of Education, New York, The Macmillan Company.
2. Kneller, G.F.(1963): Foundations of Education, London and New York, John Wiley and
Sons, Inc.
3. Phenix, P.H(1960): Philosophy of Education, New York, Holt, Rinehart and Winston.
4. Weber, C.O.(1960): Basic Philosophies of Education; New York Holt, Rinehart and Winston.
5. Weerasinghe S.G.M(1993): The Sankhya Philosophy: A Critical Evaluation of its origins and
Development, Delhi, Sri Satguru Publications, A Division of Indian Books Centre.
6. Brubacher, John S.(1962): Modern Philosophy of Education: Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood
Cliffs, N.J.
7. Pandey, R.S(1997): East West Thoughts on Education: Allahabad, Horizon Publishers.
8. Dr. T.S. Sodhi & Dr.(Mrs.) Aruna Suri (1997): Philosophical and Sociological Foundation of
Education, Bawa Publications, Patiala.
9. A.C. Banerjee & Sita Ram Sharma (1998): Sociological and Philosophical issues in
Education, Book Enclave, Jaipur.
10. A.P Sharma (1999) : An Approach to Philosophy of Education the Indian Publications.
11. M. Hiriyanna (1995): The Essentials of Indian Philosophy, Motilal Banarasidas Publishers.
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Paper-II-ADVANCED EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY-I
Total marks 100
External Theory 60
Internal Assessment 20
Practical (external) 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will
• acquire knowledge of basic concept of educational psychology.
• understand individual differences among learners.
• gain knowledge of methods of Educational Psychology and recent trends.
• understand adolescent’s growth, development and their problems.
• get acquainted with concept and conditions of learning.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (9th )
covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
a) Nature & Scope of Educational Psychology. Relevance of Education Psychology for Theory
& Practice of Education
b) Individual differences-Determinants, Role of heredity and Environment, Implications.
UNIT-II
a) Methods of Educational Psychology-Observation, Experimental, Differential: Longitudinal &
Cross sectional.
b) Recent Trends in Educational Psychology.
UNIT-III
a) Growth and Development: Concept, difference and principles of development.
b) Development during Adolescence: Physical, Cognitive, Social & Emotional.
c) Stress and strain during adolescence and its educational implications.
UNIT-IV
a) Learning: Concept and characteristics.
b) Learning theories : Pavlov’s classical conditioning, skinner’s operant conditioning, Hull’s
Reinforcement theory.
c) Factors affecting learning : Personal, environmental & task related.
PRACTICAL :
Conducting & Interpretation of following experiments:
1. Learning Curve
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2. Part VS Whole methods of learning
3. Massed VS Spaced Learning.
4. Achievement Test
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Baron, R.A. (2007): Psychology, India : Porling Kindersley & Pearson Education.
2. Bigge Morris, L. & Hunt Maurce, P. (1968) : Psychological Foundations of Education, 2nd
Edition, N.Y. Harper & Row.
3. Bienter Rober, F., Psychology Applied to Teaching, Boston : Haughton Mifflin Company.
4. Chauhan S.S. (1978) : Advanced Educational Psychology, Vikas Publishing House.
5. Danion, W. (1983) :Social and Personality Development Infancy Through Adolescence, New
York : Norton.
6. Singh, Dalip (2000) : Emotional Intelligence at work, New Delhi : Sage.
7. Dash. M. (1994) : Educational Psychology, New Delhi : Deep& Deep Publications.
8. Singh, Dalip (1995) : Emotional Intelligence, London : Bloomsbury.
9. Engler Barbara (1991) :Personality Theories : An Introduction, 3rd Ed. Boston : Houghton
Mifflin Company.
10. Good, Thomas, L. & Brodhy, Jore E.(1977) :Educational Psychology and Realistic Approach,
N.Y. Holt.
11. Mathur, S.S., (1986) : Educational Psychology, Revised and Enlarged Text Edition, Vinod
Pustak Mandir, Agra.
12. Biggee Morris C., and Row,(1971) : Learning Theories for Teachers, 2nd Edition N.Y.
Harper.
13. Dececco John, P., (1968) : The Psychology of Learning and Instruction, Prentice Hall of
India, New Delhi.
14. Gagne Peter, M.(1965): Conditions of Learning, N.Y. Hall.
15. Hilgard, E.R. and Bower, S.H., (1975) : Theories of Learning, Cliffs, Prentice Hall.
16. Hurlock,EB (2004) : Developmental Psychology : A Life span Approach (5th Ed. New Delhi)
Tata McGraw- Hill publishing Co. Ltd.
17. Kundu, C.L. & Tutoo., D.N. (1989) : Educational Psychology, New Delhi: Sterling
Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
18. Mangal, S.K. (2006) : Advanced Education Psychology, New Delhi:: Prentice Hall of India
19. Mazur, J.E. (1994) : Learning and Behaviour. (3rd ed.). Englewood Cliffs. New Jersey;
Prentice Hall
20. Lazrus Richard, S. (1963) : Personality and Adjustment, Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall.
21. Vargas J.S. (1977) : Behaviour Psychology for Teachers. New York: Harper Row.
22. Wnag. M.C. & Walber, H.J.(eds) (1985) : Adopting instruction to Individual Differences.
Berkeley Cl. Mg. Catchan.
23. Woolfolk, Anita, E. (1987) : Educational Psychology (3rd Ed.) Englewood Cliffs. Printice
Hall.
24. Woolfolk, Anita, E. (1993), Readings and Cases in Educational Psychology,Boston, Allyn
and Bacon.
25. Hall,C.S. & Lindsey(1976) :Theories of Personality, John Wiley and Sons.
26. Zohar Danah & Marshal Ian(2001) : Spiritual Intelligence: the ultimate intelligence, New
York; Bloomsbury Publishing.
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PAPER-III METHODOLOGY OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND STATISTICS-I
Total marks 100
External Theory 80
Internal Assessment 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be able to:
• define a research problem.
• formulate hypotheses.
• select sample and forward reasons in support of his/her decisions.
• select and conduct the statistical analysis of the data by applying the statistics suitable for the
problem.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions; two from each unit and one question (question no.9) covering
the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
a) Educational Research: Definition, need and importance, classification, fundamental, applied
and action research, scientific method in Educational Research.
b) Selection of research problem, areas of research: Identification and statement of research
problem, survey of related literature. Research Proposal
UNIT-II
a) Hypothesis: Definition, Types and Importance.
b) Sampling: Need of sampling, non probability sampling, probability sampling, and sampling
error.
UNIT-III
a) Measures of central Tendency
b) Variability and graphical representation of data.
UNIT-IV
a) Measures of relationship, Rank order correlation, product moment method of correlation.
b) Normal Distribution curve and its application.
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BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Ary, Donald and Jacob (1976): Introduction of Statistics, Purpose and Procedures, New
York, Holt Rinehart and Winston.
2. Best, J.W. & Kahan J.V. (1995) : Research Education, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. :td., New
Delhi.
3. Edwards, A.L. (1960) : Experimental Design in Psychological Research, New York, Holts
(revised ed.).
4. Gakhar, S.C. (2008) : Statistics in Education and Psychology . N.M Publications.
5. Garrett, H.E. (1986) : Statistics in Psychology and Education, Vikils Feffers and Simons Pvt.
Ltd.
6. Kaul Lokesh(1984) : Methodology of Educational Research, Vikas Publishing House Pvt.
Ltd., New Delhi.
7. Lindquist, E.F.(1953) : Design and Analsis of Experiments in Education and Psychology,
Houghton Mifflin Co., Boston.
8. Sidney S. (1965) : Non-Parametric Statistics, McGraw Hill Books Company, New York.
9. Tuckman, B.W.(1972) : Conducting Educational Research, Harcourt Brace, Javanovich.
10. Verman, M.(1965) : Introduction to Educational and Psychological Research, Lond. Asia.
11. Lindquist, E.F. (1960) : Elementary Statistical Methods in Psychology and Education Oxford
Book Company, New Delhi.
PAPER IV, V AND VI
OPTION A: GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING-I
Total marks 100
External Theory 60
Internal Assessment 20
Practical (external) 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be able to:
• explain the concept and techniques of guidance and counselling.
• describe various testing techniques.
• explain various guidance services.
• develop the skill of administration and interpretation of Psychological tests.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions, two from each unit and one question (9th ) covering the
entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks.
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COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
a) Concept, Purposes, Assumptions, Need and Principles of Guidance.
b) Concept, Purposes, Assumptions, Need and Principles of Counselling.
c) Individual and group counselling.
UNIT-II
a) Educational guidance with special emphasis on under achievers and drop-outs.
b) Vocational guidance, Occupational information, Placement and follow up Services.
c) Personal Guidance with special emphasis on problems of adolescents related with family and
school.
UNIT-III
a) Organization of guidance services at various levels of education (elementary/secondary/senior
secondary/ college).
b) Problems of organizing guidance services in India.
UNIT-IV
a) Characteristics of a good test. Importance of Psychological testing.
b) Intelligence, Personality, Aptitude and interest tests for student appraisal.
PRACTICAL
Administration and interpretation of Psychological tests:
a) Intelligence tests- Verbal, Non-verbal and performance.
b) Personality.
c) Interest inventory.
d) Attitude/ Value scale.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Arbucle, D.S.(1965) : Counselling : Philosophy, Theory and Practice, Boston, Allyn and
Bacon.
2. Bantole, M.D.(1984) : Guidance and Counselling, Bombay, Sheth and Sheth Publications.
3. Blocher, D.H.(1987) : The Professional Counsellor, N.Y. Macmillan.
4. Burnard, P. (2005), Counselling Skills Training, New Delhi : Viva Book Private Limited.
5. Dryden, W. and Filethaman C. (1994) : Developing Counsellor Training, London, Sage.
6. D.G.F. & T., Pumphiets Publications, Ministry of Labour. Govt. Of India.
7. Gelso, C.J. and Fretz, B.R.(1995): Counselling Psychology. Prisin Book, Banglore.
8. George, R.l. and Critiani T.S.(1990) : Counselling Theory and Practice, New Jersey, Prentice
Hall.
9. Ghosh J. (1995) : Vocational Guidance, New Delhi, U.S.S. Publication.
10. Gibson Robert L. & Mitchell, Marianne H. (2007). Introduction to Counselling and Guidance
Pearson, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.
11. Jones, A.J. et al (1970), Principles of Guidance, New York : McGraw Hill Book Company.
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12. Leuis, M.D., Mayer, R.L. and Louis, J.A.(1986) : An Introduction to Counselling, Profession,
illinas, F.E. Peacock Publishers.
13. Myers, G.E.(1948) : Principles and Techniques of Vocational Guidance. London., Mcgraw
Hills Company.
14. Pietrofa, J.J., Hoffman A. & Splete, H.H. (1984), Counselling : An Introduction. Boston
Houghton : Mifflin Company.
15. Petterson, G.H.(1962) : Counselling and Guidance in Schools, London., Mcgraw Hill Book
Company.
16. Saxena, A. (2007), Modern Techniques of Counselling, New Delhi : Rajat Publications.
17. Shertzer, B. and Stone S.C.(1974) : Fundamentals of Counselling, Boston, Houghton Mifflin
Co.
18. Shertzer, B., and Stone S.G. (1980) : Fundamentals of Guidance. Boston, Houghton Mifflin
Co.
19. Tolbert, E.L.(1978) : An Introduction to Guidance, Toronto, Little Brown and Company.
OPTION B : ADULT AND CONTINUING EDUCATION-I
Total marks 100
External Theory 60
Internal Assessment 20
Practical 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be:
• aware of the concept of lifelong education.
• acquainted with approaches to lifelong education.
• sensitized to the need of adult and continuing education in the contemporary world.
• aware of the literacy situation and government efforts for improving the literacy status.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions, s two from each unit and one question (9th) covering the entire
syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT – I
a) Adult and continuing Education; Evolution of concept, aims and practice.
b) Need and importance of Adult and continuing Education in the contemporary world.
Unit – II
a) Philosophical basis of lifelong education – Humanism and Existentialism.
b) Sociological basis of concept of lifelong education. Need and importance in the contemporary
world.
Unit – III
a) Scope of lifelong education – Literacy, awareness, continuing education and empowerment of
all sections of society.
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b) Impact of Life Long Education on formal education – Education for diverse target groups
through
(i) Open Learning
(ii) Web Based Education
(iii) Community Colleges.
Unit – IV
a) Literacy situation in India. Total Literacy Campaign (TLC) Objectives and Strategies.
b) Monitoring and Evaluation of TLC
PRACTICAL
Poster preparation and exhibition of any /all of the following
1. Open learning
2. Part time courses
3. Web based Education
Note: Assessment of practical work will be made by a board consisting of the subject teacher. One
subject expert (external) and the Chairperson/Principal
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Alford, Harold J.(1968): Continuing education in action : residential centres for lifelong
learning. New York : Wiley,
2. Belanger. P. & Gelpi.E. (1995) : Lifelong Education, London : Kluwer Academic Publishers.
3. Indian Journal of Adult Education, 69,3,2008.
4. Indian Journal of Adult Education, 69,4,.2008
5. International Journal of Adult and Lifelong Education, 68 (1-2) 2007.
6. International Journal of Adult and Lifelong Education, 68 (3-4) 2007.
7. International Journal of Adult and Lifelong Education, Vol. No. 1.,(2003), UNESCO &
UNDP Documents and Publications.
8. Jarvis, Peter, (1990) :International dictionary of adult and continuing education, London,
Routledge,
9. Jethither, Bhart,(1996) : Adult Education & Extension. New Delhi : APH Publishers,
10. New Frontiers in Education-International Journal of Education, Vol. XXXII, No.2 April-June,
11. Pareek, Vijay Kumar,(1992) : Adult Education. Delhi. Himansher,
12. Patil, S.P., (1996) : Problems of adult education programme- Ambala Cantt. Assosiated Pubs.,
13. Rahi, A.L, (1996) : Adult Education Policies and Programmes, Ambala Cantt. Associated
Pubs.,
14. Rao, D.S. (1993) : Continuing Education in India, Ambala : the Associated Publishers.
15. Rao, V.Janardhana,(2000) : Problem of Continuing Education, New Delhi :Discovery Pub.,
16. Reddy, G.Lokanandha,(1997) : Role performance of adult education teachers : problems and
prospects- New Delhi : Discovery Pub.,
17. Roy, Nikhil Ranjan, (1967) : Adult Education in India and abroad- Delhi : Chand, x
18. Seetharamu, A.S. & Devi (1994) : Adult Education, New Delhi : Ashish Publications.
19. Sharma, Inder Prabha, (1985) : Adult Education in India : policy perspective-New Delhi :
NBO Pub.,
20. Singh, U.K. & Sudarshan, K.N. (1996) : Non-Formal and Continuing Education, New Delhi :
Discovery Publishing House.
21. Singh, U.K. & Nayak, A.K. (1997) : Lifelong Education, New Delhi :Commonwealth
Publishers.
22. Slowyey Maria & Watson David (2003) : Higher Education and the Life Course, Berkshire
England : Open University Press, Mc Graw-Hill Education.
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23. Sodhi, T.S.(1987) : Adult Education : a multidisciplinary approach, Ludhiana : Katson Pub.
House.
24. UGC Guidelines of Lifelong Learning and Extension (2007-2012), University Grants
Commission : New Delhi.
25. UNDP (2006), Human Development Report 2006, New York, Oxford University Press.
26. Venkataiah, S.(2000) : Lifelong and Continuing Education. New Delhi, Anmol Pub.,
27. Venkataiah, S.ed.(2000) : Lifelong and Continuing Education. New Delhi, Anmol Pub.,
28. Ward, Kevin & Taylor, Richard eds.(1986) : Adult Education and the working class :
Education for the missing millians. London : Croom Helm.
29. Yadav, Rajender Singh, (1991) : Adult Education Training and Productivity, Ambala Cantt.
Indian Publications.
OPTION C: VALUE EDUCATION & HUMAN RIGHTS -I
Total marks 100
External Theory 80
Internal Assessment 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be able to understand:
• The need and importance of Value-Education ,
• the nature of values in Indian context.
• Various approach to value development viz-a-viz their cognitive and social
development.
• The human rights in the field of education.
• The philosophical basis of human rights.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (9th )
covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENTS:
UNIT-I
Value Education and Culture:
a) Need and importance of Value Education
b) Indian Culture and Human Values.
UNIT-II
Approaches to Value Development:
a) Psycho-analytic approach.
b) Learning theory approach, especially social learning theory approach.
c) Cognitive development approach- Piaget. Kohlberg: Stages of moral development – their
characteristics and features.
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UNIT-III
a) Human Rights and Education: Need and importance and Recommendations of various
National and International Bodies.
b) Right to access and Equal opportunity in education
UNIT-IV
Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights: Nature and Sources.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Karan, Reddy, & V. Narakyan (1979): Education and Value, New Delhi : B.R.
Publishers Corpn.
2. Symonides, J(2002) : Human Rights Concept and Standards, Rawat Publications.
3. Mohanty, J(2005) : Teaching of Human Rights: New Trends and Innovations. New Delhi,
Deep and Deep Publications PVT. LTD.
4. Tarrow, N.B(1987) : Human Rights and Education Vol-3, Programon Press.
5. Pandey, V.C(2005) :Value Education and Education for Human Rights : Delhi, Isha
Books.
6. Bhatt, S.R. (1986) : Knowledge, Vale and Education : An Axionoetic Analysis, Delhi :
Gian Publisher.
7. Josta, Hari Ram (1991) : Spiritual Values and Education, Ambala Cantt : Associated
Publishers.
8. Kar, N.N. (1996) : Value Education : APhilosophical Study, Ambala Cantt: Associated
Publishers.
OPTION-D: COMPARATIVE EDUCATION-I
Total marks 100
External Theory 80
Internal Assessment 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be able to:
• Explain the concept of Comparative Education.
• Understand the need and importance of Comparative Education.
• Explain the factors influencing the educational system of a country.
• Understand the structure of educational system in different countries.
• Compare the education ladder of U.K., Egypt and India.
• Compare the salient features of educational system of U.K., Egypt and India with special
reference to administration and control.
• Understand & compare the objectives, system of admission and evaluation of above
mentioned countries.
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• Understand problems, recent trends and innovations in Education in above mentioned
countries.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (9th )
covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
a) Meaning, History, Purpose, Method and Limitation of Comparative Education.
b) Factors influencing the educational system of a country- political, social, linguistic,
geographical and economic.
UNIT-II
a) Education ladder of U.K., Egypt and India.
b) Compare the salient features of educational system of U.K., Egypt and India with special
reference to administration and control.
UNIT-III
a) Objectives of education at each stage and curriculum in general in UK, Egypt and India.
b) System of admission and examination at different stages of education of U.K. Egypt and
India.
UNIT-IV
a) Educational problems at each stage in above mentioned countries.
b) Recent trends and innovations in education in above mentioned countries.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Beredy, G.Z.F.(1964) : Comparative Methods in Education, Oxford & East Publishing Co.,
New Delhi.
2. Blavic, Emile (1987) : Primary Education : Development and Reform, Perspectives in
Education, Vol. 3, No. 3, 153-60.
3. Carlton, R., Colley and Machinnon (1977) : Educational Change and Society, Toronto, Gage
Educational Publishing.
4. Carnoy, M.H.Levin (1985) : Schooling and Work in the Democratic State, Stanford
University Press, Standford, California.
5. Cantor, Leonard(1989) : The Re-visioning of Vocational Education in American High School,
Journal of Comparative Education, Vol.25, Number 2.
6. Dearden. R.F.(1970) : The Philosophy of Primary Education. The English Language Book
Society & Routledge and Kegan Paul Ltd., Broadway House, London.
7. Dent, H.C.(1961) : The Educational System of England and Wales, University of London
Press Ltd., Warwick Square London & C.V.
8. Epstein, Erwin, H., (1987) : Against the Currents : ACritique of Ideology in Comparative
Education, Compare, 17, No. 1.
9. Green, J.L. (1981) : Comparative Education and Global Village, Anu Book, Shivaji Road,
Meerut.
10. Georgie, D.M. (1978) : Education in Modern Egypt : Ideals and Realities, Routledge and
Kegan Paul; London, Hexley and Boston.
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11. Hans, Nicholas (1965) : Comparative Education, Routledge and Kegan Paul Ltd., London.
12. James, H.R. & Mathew, A. (1988) : Development of Education System in India, D.K.
Publisher Distributors (P.) Ltd., Ansari Road, Daryaganj, New Delhi.
13. Jangira, N.K.(1986) : Special Education Scenario in Britain and India : Issues, Practice,
Perspective Indian Documentation, Service Book Seller and Publishers, Patel Nagar, P.B. No.
13, Gurgaon.
14. Sharma, Y.K. (2004) : Comparative Education – A Comparative Study of Educational
Systems, New delhi: Kanishka Publishers.
15. Sodhi, T.S., (1983): A Text Book of Comparative Education, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing
House Pvt. Ltd.
16. Choube, S.P. and Choube, A(1993) : Comparative Education, New Delhi : Commonwealth
Publishers.
17. Rao, V.K. and Reddy, R.S. (2004) : Comparative Education, New Delhi : Common wealth
Publishers.
18. Sharma, R.N. (2008) : Comparative Education, New Delhi: Surjeet Publications, Kamla
Nagar.
19. Choube, S.P., Features of Comparative Education, Agra : Vinod Pustak Mandir.
20. Sharma, R.A. (2007): Comparative Education, Meerut : R Lall Book Depot.
21. Sharma, R.A. (2005) : Comparative Perspective on Education, Jaipur : ABD Publishers,
Imliwala Phatak.
22. Sharma, R.A. (2008) : Tulnatamak Adhyan Shiksha, R. Lall Book Depot, Meerut, (HINDI
VERSION).
23. Rawat, Dubey and Upadhyaya (2008) : Comparative Education Agra : Radha Krishan
Mandir.
OPTION E: TEACHER EDUCATION-I
Total marks 100
External Theory 80
Internal Assessment 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be able to:
• describe the need, concept and scope of teacher education, historical development
with special emphasis on different documents.
• highlight the aims and objectives of teacher education at elementary, secondary and
higher education level.
• explain structure, administration, curriculum methodology and evaluation procedure
of pre-service teacher training.
• discuss the structure, agencies and methods of in-service teacher training programme.
• acquaint the students with Professional organizations of various levels of teachers.
• familiarize with programmes of faculty improvement, performance appraisal and of
their methods of recruitment and selection.
• describe the organization of teacher education through distance education.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions, s two from each unit and one question (9th ) covering the
entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks
20
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
a) Need, concept and scope of teacher education.
b) Historical development of teacher education with special emphasis on Kothari Education
Commission Report (1946-66), National Policy of Education (1986), C.A.B.E. Committee
Report, UGC (1994), National Curriculum Framework (2005).
UNIT-II
Pre- Service Training:
a) Objectives at different levels
b) Structure for Teacher Education in India
c) Recommendations for curriculum at different levels.
d) Methodology of curriculum Transaction.
e) Evaluation Techniques
UNIT-III
In-service Education:
a) Types of in-service courses for teachers
(Orientation courses, workshops, seminars refresher courses, summer institutes).
b) Agencies for in-service education
(Institutional Programmes, S.I.E., D.I.E.T., N.C.T.E., N.C.E.R.T., Academic Staff College,
Extension Department).
UNIT-IV
a) Different modes of education used for Distance Education of Teachers.
b) Recommendation for B.Ed. correspondence.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Aggarwal, J.C.(1984) : Landmark in the History of Modern India Education, Vikas
Publishing House, Ansari Road, New Delhi-110002.
2. Chaurasia, G.(1976) : New Era in Teacher Education, New Delhi.
3. Devedi, Prabhakar (1980) : Teacher Education- a Resource Book, N.C.E.R.T., New Delhi.
4. Govt. of India (1966) : Education and National Development, Report of Education
Commission, N.Delhi.
5. Govt. of India (1992) :Report of C.A.B.E. Committee Department of Education, New Delhi.
6. Govt. Of India (1986), National Policy of Education, Ministry of Human Resource and
Development, New Delhi.
7. Khan, Mohd. Sharif (1983) : Teacher Education in india and Abroad, Sheetal Printing Press,
Karol Bagh, New Delhi-110005.
8. Kohli, V.K.(1992) : Teacher Education in India, Vivek Publishers, Ambala.
9. Misra, K.S.(1993) : Teachers and their Education, Associated Publication, New Delhi.
10. Mohanty, J.N.(1993) : Adult and National Education, Deep and Deep Publication, NewDelhi.
11. Mohanty , J.N.(1988) : Modern Trends in India Education, Deep and Deep Publication, N.
Delhi.
12. N.I.E.P.A. (1984) : Report on Status of Teachers, New Delhi.
13. Rao, D.B.(1988) : Teacher Education in India, New Delhi, Discovery publishing house.
14. Singh, L.C (1983) : Third National Survey of Scholastic Education in India, N.C.E.R.T., New
Delhi.
21
15. Srivastava, R.C & Bose K. (1973) : Theory & Practice of Teaching Education in India,
Chugh Publication 2 Strachey Road, Allahabad.
16. Stones & Morris (1973) : Teaching Practice Problems and Prospective, Mathuen & Co.,
London.
17. Devedi, Prabhakar (1980) : Teacher Education – “A Resource Book, NCERT, New Delhi
18. Khan, Mohd. Sharif (1983) : Teacher Education in Indian and Abroad, Sheetal Printing Press.
New Delhi
19. Sharma., R.A. (2005) : Teacher Education, Loyal Book Depot, Meerut.
20. Sharma, S.P.(2005) : Teacher Education, Kanishka Publisher , New Delhi.
21. Udayveer (2006) : Modern Teacher Training Anmol Publications, New Delhi.
OPTION-F: SPECIAL EDUCATION-I
Total marks 100
External Theory 60
Internal Assessment 20
Practical (external) 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be able to:
• acquaint the students with the concepts of exceptionality and special education
• develop awareness about current trends and legislation
• familiarize themselves with the concept and provision for the mentally challenged
• familiarize themselves with the concept and intervention strategies for the learning disabled
• develop skills to identify children with special need
• be sensitised towards social alternatives
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (9th )
covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
1. Special education: concept, nature, Objectives, historical and philosophical perspective.
2. Classification of exceptional children, relevance of special education.
UNIT-II
Current Trends in special education:
1. Inclusion, Integration , Legislation ( RCI Act 1992), PWD Act. 1995, National Trust Act
1999, National Policy on Disability 2006)
22
2. Community based rehabilitation. (CBR) and Least Restricted Environment. (LRE), Team
work family professional partnership.
UNIT-III
Mental Retardation/ Mentally Challenged:
1. Definition, Characteristics, Needs, prevention, need and problem.
2. Classification, Identification, Teaching strategies, Educational and Training programmes for
children with mental retardation.
UNIT-IV
Learning Disabilities:
1. Concept, Nature, Causes and Types.
2. Identification and Intervention strategies for remediation of Dyslexia, Dyscalculia and
dysgraphia.
PRACTICAL WORK: Marks : 20
a) Administration and Interpretation of DTLD, DST-Bharat Raj/BASIC-MR, Peshawariya et
al, VSMS.
b) Discussion/ Debates and reporting on sexuality and marriage alternatives for children with
special needs.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Hallahan, D.P. & Kauffman, J.M. (1991) : Exceptional Children—Introduction to Special
Education, Allyn & Bacon, Massachusetts.
2. Frank, M.H. & Steven, R.F. (1984) : Education of Exceptional Learners, Allyn & Bacon,
Inc., Massachusetts.
3. Kirk, S.A. & Gallagher, J.J. (1989) : Education of Exceptional Children, Houghton Mifflin
Co., Boston.
4. Berdine, W.H., Blackhurst, A.E. (eds.) (1980) : An Introduction to Special Education, Little,
Brown and Company, Boston.
5. Ysseldyke, J.E. and Algozzine, B. (1998) : Special Education, New Delhi, Kanishka
Publishers, Distributor.
6. Hans, I.J. (2000) : Children in Need of Special Care, Human Horizons Series, Souvenir Press
(E & A Ltd.).
7. Advani, L & Chadha, A. (2003) : You and your special Child, New Delhi: UBS publishers
and Distributors
8. Encyclopaedia of special Education (1987) : Vol.1,2,3 ed’s cecil.r. Reynolds and Lester
Mann, New York : John Wiley and Sons.
9. Panda, K.C. (1997) : Education of Exceptional Children, New Delhi: Vikas Publication
House.
23
OPTION G: EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY-I
Total marks 100
External Theory 60
Internal Assessment 20
Sessional work/Practical (external) 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: At the end of the course, the students will be able to :
• Explain the meaning, types and scope of Educational Technology.
• Formulate instructional objectives for different domains.
• Explain the concept of variables, phases and levels of Teaching.
• Describe different Models of teaching and develop two sample lesson plans.
• Explain Microteaching and Interaction analysis along with their principles and
processes.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (9th )
covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
a) Educational Technology: Concept, nature and perspective.
b) Development of Educational Technology in historical perspective, components of
Educational Technology: psycho-technology, planning technology Management Technology ,
ICT, Systems technology.
UNIT-II
a) Objectives: Differentiation and derivation from aims to goals, general objectives from goals
and instructional objectives from general objectives.
b) Formulating instructional objectives, categorization of objectives in taxonomic categories of
Cognitive, Affective and Psychomotor domains.
UNIT-III
a) Teaching: concept, variables, phases and levels of teaching: Memory, Understanding and
Reflective level.
b) Models of teaching, Bruner’s concept attainment model, Ausubel’s Advance organizer
Model, Taba’s Inductive Thinking Model.
UNIT-IV
a) Teacher Training Techniques : Simulated teaching and Microteaching.
b) Observation of Classroom interaction: Flanders Interaction analysis: concept, assumptions,
coding and decoding procedures.
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SESSIONAL WORK:
1) Demonstration of teaching skills through Microteaching (Two lessons)
2) Coding & decoding classroom interaction through Flanders (Two lessons).
3) Two sample lesson plans on models of teaching
BOOKS SUGGESTED:
1. Bhushan,A & Ahuja, M.(1992) : Educational Technology, Meerut, Vikas Publication, B-57,
Meenakshi Puram.
2. Bigge, M.L. & Hunt, M.(1968) : Psychological Foundation of Education, London, Harper and
Row Publishers.
3. Bloom, B.S.(1972) : Taxonomy of Education Objectives. A Hand Book-I(Cognitive Domain),
New York: Devid Mokeay Campo.
4. Chauhan, S.S. (1978) : A Textbook of Programmed Instruction, New Delhi, Sterling
Publishers.
5. Das, R.C.(1993) : Educational Technology : A Basic Text, New Delhi, Sterling Publishers.
6. Dececco, J.P. & Cramford, W.R., (1970) : Psychology of Learning and Instructions, Prentice
Hall of India Pvt. Ltd.
7. Flanders, Ned A.(1978): Analysing Teaching Behaviour, London , Addison Wesley
Publishing Co.
8. Gage, N.L., (1978) : The Scientific Basis of the Art of Teaching, London, Teacher’s College
Press.
9. Joyce, B.Weil, M. & Showers, B., (1985) : Models of Teaching, Prentice Hall of India, Pvt.
Ltd.
10. Mehra, V.(2010) : A text book of Educational Technology, New Delhi : Sanjay Prakashan.
OPTION-H: MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION-I
Total marks 100
External Theory 80
Internal Assessment 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: At the end of the course, the students will be able to :
• acquaint the students with concepts and techniques of measurement and evaluation.
• develop skills in the construction and standardization of tests.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (9th )
covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks.
25
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
a) Concept of measurement and evaluation.
b) Importance of measurement and evaluation, Types of Evaluation.
c) Levels of measurement.
UNIT-II
a) Types of achievement tests – Essay and objective type test.
b) Standardized tests and teacher made tests.
c) Steps in standardisation of achievement tests.
d) Norm referenced and criterion referenced tests.
e) Item analysis: Item difficulty, discrimination index. Effectiveness of distracters.
UNIT-III
Characteristics of measuring tools:
a) Reliability—meaning, methods and factors affecting reliability
b) Validity—meaning, types and factors affecting validity.
c) Norms— age, grade percentile, standard scores (T scores, C scores, Z scores).
UNIT-IV
a) Significance of Statistics and difference between statistics (Mean only).
b) Analysis of variance( one way and two way) : Assumptions and Computation
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Anastasi,, A. (1983): Psychological Testing.., 6th Ed. New York, The Macmillan Co
2. Ebel, L.R. and Fristrie, D.A. (1991) : Essentials of Educational Measurement, New
Delhi.,Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd.,
3. Freeman, F.S. (1965): Theory & Practice of Psychological Testing, New york : Rinehart &
Winston,
4. Garrett, H.E. (1973): Statistics in Education and Pshychology, Bombay, Vakils Febber and
Simon.
5. Guilford, S.P. and Fruchtor, B.(1973) : Fundamental Statistics in Pshychology and Education
5th Ed., McGraw Hill and Co., New York.
6. Popham, W.J. (1988) : Educational Evluation, New Delhi: Prentice Hall
7. Thorndike, R.L. and Hagen E.(1977) : Measurement and Evaluation on Psychology and
Education. . New York., John Wiley and Sons, Inc
8. Aiken, L.R.( 1985) : Psychological Testing and Assessment, Boston : Allyn and Bacon, .
26
9. Grownlund, N.E. (1981 ): Measurement and Evaluation in Teaching, New York: Macmillan,.
10. Karmel, L.C & KarmelM.C. , (1978): Measurement and Evaluation in Schools, New York:
Macmillan.
11. Mehren, W.A. and Lehmann, I.J. (1984) : Measurement and Evaluation in Eduation and
Psychology, New York : Holt., Rinehart, Winston.
12. Aggarwal, Y.P. (1989): Statistical Methods. Concepts Application & Computation, New
Delhi : Sterling,
13. Guilford, J.P.(1978) : Fundamental Statistics in Psychology and Education, New York:
McGraw Hills, 6th Ed.
14. Cronbach, L.G. (1964.) : Essentials of Psychological Testing, New York : Harper,
15. Aggarwal, R.N. & Vipin Asthana (1983): Educational Measurement & Evaluation, Agra :
Vinod Pustak Mandir.
OPTION I: CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT-I
Total Marks 100
External Theory 60
Internal Assessment 20
Sessional work 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be:
• Understand the concept of curriculum and curriculum development
• Explain the foundations of curriculum
• Explain he principles of curriculum construction
• Describe factors affecting curriculum change
• Explain eclectic model of curriculum design
• Explain Taba’s model of curriculum development
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (9th )
covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT – I
a) Concept of curriculum development and other curricular fields (curriculum design and
curriculum engineering)
b) Epistemological, social and psychological foundations of curriculum development
27
UNIT- II
a) Nature, purpose and scope of curriculum development.
b) Principles of formulating aims, specific content, defining teaching learning experiences and
evaluation procedures
UNIT – III
a) Factors affecting curriculum change:
• Social factors
• Pressure groups
• Writers and publishers
b) Role of teacher as a curriculum maker
UNIT– IV
1. Eclectic model of curriculum design
2. Taba’s model of curriculum development.
SESSIONAL WORK:
Course construction according to Taba’s Model
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Annuing, Angela (1995): “A National Curriculum for the Early Years”, Open University
Press, Buckingham, Philadelphia.
2. Audrey & Howard Nocholls(1978) : “Developing Curriculum”, A practical guide- George
Allen & Unwin, Boston, Sydney, London.
3. Denis Lawton(1986) : “School curriculum planning ”.Hodder & Stonghton, London, Sydney.
4. Edward, A.Krug(1960) : The Secondary School Curriculum”, Harper and Row Publishers,
New York & Evauston.
5. Erickson, H.Lynn(1998) : Concept-based curriculum and instruction, Corwin Press,Inc.
6. Gakhar, S.C.(2009): Curriculum Development, Panipat, N.M. Publications
7. Goodson, Iror.F.(1994) :”Studying Curriculum”, Open University Press, Buckingham.
8. Hugh (1976) : ”Designing the curriculum,” Open Books London.
9. Iron, K. Davies (1976), Objectives in Curriculum Design, Mcgraw Hill Book company
Limited, England.
10. Leece, Joseph & others(1961) : “The Teacher in Curriculum”.
11. Lewy, Aneh(1991) : “Studying Curriculum”, Open University Press, Buckingham.
12. Ornstein, Allen C.A., “Curriculum Foundations, Principles and Issues”, Prentice Hall
International Ltd., London.
13. Pratt, David(1980): “Curriculum Design and Development”, Harcourt Brace and World Inc.,
New York.
14. Romiszowski, A.J(1986) : “Designing Instructional System-Decision making in Course
Planning & Design”.
15. Saylor & Alexander,(1960) : Curriculum Planning”,Holt Linchart & Winston, New York.
16. Smith, Stawey & Shores,(1957) :”Curriculum Development”, World Book Co.
17. Solomen, Pearl G.,(1998) : “ The Curriculum Bridgo”, Corwin Press Inc.
18. Tyler,R.W.(1974) : “Basic Principles of Curriculum and Instruction,”OpenUniversity Pub.,
London.
19. Vernon,E. Anderson(1962) : “Principles and Procedures of Curriculum Improvement”.
20. Zais, R.S.(1976) : “Curriculum Principles and Foundations”, Harper & Row Pub., London.
28
OPTION J: ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION-I
Total marks 100
External Theory 60
Internal Assessment 20
Practical(External) 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be:
• explain the concept and component of environment
• explain the concept and types of ecosystems.
• describe food chain and food web.
• explain the concept, importance, scope and aims of environmental education.
• enlist the principles and foundations of environmental education
• discriminate between different types of environmental pollution
• suggest some strategies for environmental conservation.
• discuss the importance of responsible environmental behaviour
• discuss the importance of environmental awareness, attitude, sensitivity and action strategies
for teachers and students
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (9th )
covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT- I
a) Concept and components of environmental education
b) Concept and types of ecosystem.
c) Food chain and food web.
UNIT– II
a) Concept, importance and scope of environmental education
b) Aims and objectives of environmental education
c) Principles and foundations of environmental education.
UNIT– III
a) Environmental pollution : air, water, soil and noise and radioactive pollution.
b) Extinction of flora and fauna, deforestation and soil erosion
c) Importance of environmental conservation and strategies for environmental conservation
UNIT– IV
a) Meaning, importance and components of responsible environmental behaviour among
teachers and students.
29
b) Importance of environmental awareness, environmental attitude, environmental sensitivity
and environmental action strategies for teacher and students.
PRACTICAL
A Community survey for determining environmental awareness, sensitivity among students/teachers.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Dani, H.M.(1986): Environmental Education, Chandigarh. Publication Bureau, Panjab
University,
2. Bhall,S.C. and Khanna, H.(2007): Environmental Education, New Delhi: Regal Publication.
3. Nagra, V. (2006) : Environmental Education, Jalandhar : Sharma Publications.
4. Nanda, K.V. (1997) : Environmental Education, New Delhi,: APH Publishing Corpn.
5. Nasrin (2007) : Education, Environment and Society, New Delhi: APH Publishing Corpn.
6. Saxena, A.B. (1986) : Environmental Education, Agra : National Psychological Corpn.
7. Sharma, R.C. (1981) : Environmental Education, New Delhi : Metropolitan Book Co.,
8. Shrivastava, K.A.(2007) : Global Warning, New Delhi: APH Publishing Corpn.
9. Shukla, K.S. and Srivastava, R.P. (1992) : Emerging Pattern of Environmental Structure, New
Delhi: Commonwealth Publishers.
10. Singh, K.Y.(2005) : Teaching of Environment Science, New Delhi: Chaman Enterprises
11. Sudhir, A.M. and Masillamani, M.(2003) : Environmental Issues, New Delhi ; Reliance
Publishing House.
OPTION K: YOGA EDUCATION-I
Total marks 100
External Theory 60
Internal Assessment 20
Practical(External) 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be:
• appreciate the role of Yoga in life.
• appreciate the role of yoga in the development of moral values and social values
• understand ‘traditional’ and ‘philosophical’ aspects of yoga
• understand some technical and health aspects of yoga.
• practice the prescribed Asana, Pranayama and Shudhi kriyas.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (9th )
covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks.
30
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT– I
a) Meaning and concept of yoga, types of yoga with their special features, aims and objectives.
b) Introduction to Patanjali Yoga Darshan with special features of its four chapters.
UNIT– II
a) Srimad Bhagwad Gita: Gyan, Karma and Bhakti Yoga – their meaning and concept with their
special features in respect of attainment of Moksha.
b) Hathyoga Pradipika: Hath Yoga – Its meaning, aim and objectives, various components of
Hath Yoga with their brief special features and benefits.
UNIT– III
a) Meaning of Astang Yoga and its components.
b) Yama (abstinences) and Niyama (observances) meaning and components of Yama and
Niyama with emplhasis on their significance in modern life.
UNIT– IV
a) Shudi Kriyas : Its meaning, aims and objectives, technique and benefits of Neti(Jal & Sutra),
and Dhauti (Vastra and Vaman)
b) Shudhi Kriyas : Its meaning, aims and objectives, technique and benefits of Tratak,
Kapalbhati and Basti Kriya.
PRACTICAL
Unit – I : ASANAS
1. Sudhi Kriyas : Jal Neti, Rubber Neti, Kapalbhati and Tratak.
2. Asanas
Yogic Exercise : Surya Namaskar
Meditative Pose : Padam, Vajra, Sidha
Relaxative : Shav and Makar
Cultural : Sarvang, Hal, Pawanmukut, Matesya, Bhujang,
Dhanur, Vakar & Ushtr
3. Prayanama : Correct Deep Breathing in Respect of 1:2 Ratio for
Purks and Rechka, 15-30 minutes Practice for
Nadishodhan, Suryabhedhan, Ujjai, Sitali/Shitkari,
4. Meditation/Relaxatioin : Yoga Nidra
31
5. Viva-voce and Note Book* :
The students have to prepare practical notebook in respect of introduction of Asans, Pranayama,
Meditation, Kriyas and meaning, technique and benefit of 5 Asans, two Pranayama, two Kiriyas and
one Meditation.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. B.K.S.Lyenger (1984): Light of Yoga, Unwin Paper Back, Sydney, English/Hindi
2. Chandradhar Sharma, 1976): A Critical Survey of Indian Philosophy; Moti Lal Banarsi Dass,
Delhi
3. Dr.H.R.Nagendra, (1993):Yoga in Education, Banglore ,Vivekanande Kendra,
4. I.R. Taimini, ,(1973): Glimpses into Psychology of Yoga, Madras , The Theosophical
Publishing House.
5. P.T. Raju; (1982): DelhiThe Philosophical Traditions of India, Moti Lal Banarsi Dass,
6. S.N. Das Gupta(1987) : Yoga Philosophy in Relation to other system of Indian Thought, Moti
Lal Banarsi Dass, New Delhi.
7. Dictionary of Indian Philosophy and Yoga Edu. Dr.Arun Publications, Chandigarh (1997).
8. Brahmrishi Vishvatma Bawara, (1997) Yoga for Life Divine, Radiance Publications,
Chandigarh
9. Swami Kuvalyananda (1992) : Pranayama, Bombay, Popular Prakashan,- English/Hindi
10. Swami Kuvalyananda (1983).Pranayama, Bombay Popular Prakashan,
OPTION L: EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT-I
Total marks: 100
External Theory : 80
Internal Assessment: 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES : After completing the course, the student will be able to :
• understand concepts and application of administration and management in the field of
education.
• administrative aspects.
• leadership and its various concepts.
• Organizational Behaviour.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (9th )
covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks.
32
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
Educational Administration and Management: Meaning & Scope; Basic Principles.
UNIT-II
Administrative Processes with special reference to Educational Organizations:
1. Communication
2. Decision Making
3. Organizational Development and Compliance
4. Management by Objectives(MBO)
5. Organizational Change
UNIT-III
Organizational Behaviour: wrt. Educational Institutions
Motivation, Job satisfaction, Relationships in organizational set up, Conflict Professionalism.
UNIT-IV
Leadership in Educational Organizations:
a) Meaning and Nature
b) Theories of leadership & their relevance in education
c) Styles of leadership
d) Leadership Traits & skills
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Agarwal , V.Bhatnagar, R.P,( 1997) : Supervision, Planning and Financing, Meerut, India :
Surya Publication,
2. Chandrasekaran, P., (1994):Educational Planning and Management, New Delhi : Sterling
Publishers,
3. Greene, J.F., (1975): School Personnel Administration, Chilton Book Company :
Pennysylvania,
4. Khan, N. Sharif & Khan, M. Saleem,(1980): Educational Administration, New Delhi : Ashish
Publishing House,
5. Kuldip Kaur, Education in India (1985) : Policies, Planning and Implementation, Chandigarh
: Arun and Rajiv Pvt. Ltd.,
6. Lulla, B.P. & Murthy, (1976): S.K., Essential of Educational Administration, Chandigarh :
Mohindra Capital Publishing,
7. Manju, Bala, (1990):Leadership Behaviour and Educational Administration, New Delhi :
Deep & Deep Publications,
8. Mathur, S.S., Educational Administration and Management, Ambala Cantt. : Indian
Publicatons.
33
9. Mukherji, S.N., (1970).:Administration and Educational Planning and Finance, Baroda :
Acharya Book Depot,
10. Philip H. Coomba, (1985).: The World Crisis in Educatin, Oxford University Press,
11. Tara Chand and Ravi Prakash, (1996).: Advanced Educational Administration, New Delhi :
Kanishka Publishers,
12. Thakur D. & Thakur, D.N., (1996): Educational Planning and Administration, New Delhi :
Deep and Deep Publications,
13. Thomas I Sergiovanni, (1980):Educational Governance and Administration, America :
Prentice Hall,
14. Trivedi, P.R. & Sudershan, K.N., (1996 ): Management Education, New Delhi : Discovery
Publishing House,
OPTION M: DISSERTATION
The student will be required to submit the synopsis for dissertation.
SEMESTER II
PAPER-I FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (SOCIOLOGICAL)-II
Total marks: 100
External Theory: 80
Internal Assessment: 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: The syllabus has been designed in order to attain the following
objectives:
• understand the intimate relationship between education and sociology.
• consider the impact of Indian constitutional provisions on the development of Indian
social order in view of its secularist and democratic values.
• acquaint with the sociological problems of Indian society and the role of education in
finding their solutions.
• understand the meaning of modernization and social change in the context of Indian
social order.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (question
no. 9) covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks.
34
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
a) Concept and relationship of sociology and education, meaning of educational sociology and
sociology of education.
b) Education in relation to social change and modernization.
c) Constraints on social change in India (caste, ethnicity, class, language, religion, regionalism).
UNIT-II
a) Education as related to social equity and equality of educational opportunities.
b) Education as related to social stratification an d social mobility
UNIT-III
a) Education and politics: Their relationship (with special reference to communism, facism,
socialism and democracy)
b) Education and Secularism.
UNIT-IV
a) Culture: Meaning and nature of culture, role of education in cultural context; education
cultural change.
b) Economy and education-Impact of LPG (Liberalisation, Privatization and Globalisation) on
education.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1) Banerjee A.C. & Sharma S.R. (1999) : Sociological and Philosophical issues in Education,
Book Enclave, Jaipur.
2) Coulby, D & Zambeta, G. (2005) : Globalization & Nationalism in Education : Routledge
Falmer. New York.
3) Kenkel, W.F., Society in Action (1980) : Introduction to Sociology. New York: Harper and
Row
4) Mathur S.S.,(2008): A Sociological approach to Indian Education, Vinod Pustak Mandir
Agra,
5) Pandey, R.S. (1997), East West Thoughts on Education, Allahabad : Horizon Publishers.
6) Sodhi T.S. & Suri A.(1998) : Philosophical and Sociological Foundation of Education, Bawa
Publications, Patiala.
7) Wilbur, B. Brookover, D. Gottieb (1964) : A sociology of Education, New York,: American
Book Company.
8) Weber C.O. (1960), Basic Philosophies of Education, New York : Holt, Rinehart & Wintson.
35
Paper-II-ADVANCED EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY-II
Total marks 100
External Theory 60
Internal Assessment 20
Practical(External) 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will
• analyse the learning process based on theoretical approaches of learning
• understand and be able to measure the learner’s cognitive abilities with special
reference to intelligence
• gain knowledge of concept and theories of personality
• understand children with special needs; identification and their educational
provisions
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (question
no. 9) covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
1. Transfer of learning: concept, types, theories, implications
2. Kohler’s insight theory of insightful learning, Tolman’s sign theory of learning, Gagne’s
hierarchy of learning
UNIT-II
1. Intelligence: Concept and Nature, Spiritual and Emotional Intelligence
2. Theories of intelligence: Spearman, Thurstone, Guilford, Gardner and Sternberg
3. Assessment of intelligence and recent development
UNIT-III
1. Personality: concept and theories by Cattle, Eysenck, Allport and Freud
2. Adjustment: concept, defence mechanisms, conflict management
UNIT-IV
1. Children with special needs : concept, classification, Historical perspective.
2. Concept, characteristics, identification and education of children with
i) Learning disability
36
ii) Giftedness
PRACTICALS
1. Intelligence Test:
2. Personality Test
3. Test of adjustment/well being.
4. Transfer of learning with mirror drawing.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Baron, R.A. (2007): Psychology, India : Porling Kindersley and Pearson Education
2. Bigge Morris, L. & Hunt Maurce,(1968) P. Psychological Foundations of Education, 2nd
Edition, N.Y. Harper & Row.
3. Bienter Roher F. Mifflin, Psychology Applied to Teaching, , Boston, Haughton.
4. Chauhan S.S. (1978): Advanced Educational Psychology, Vikas Publishing House.
5. Danion W.V(1983): Social and Personality Development Infancy Through Adolescence,
,New York, Norton.
6. Dalip Singh,(2000): Emotional Intelligence at work, , New Delhi : Sage.
7. Dash, M. (1994), Educational Psychology, New Delhi : Deep & Deep Publications.
8. Daniel Singh(1995): Emotional Intelligence,London : Bloowsbusy.
9. Engler Barbara (1991): Personality Theories : An Introduction, 3rd Ed., Boston : Houghton
Mifflin Company.
10. Good, Thomas, L. & Brodhy, Jore E.(1977): Educational Psychology and Realistic
Approach,, N.Y. Holt.
11. Hurlock, E.B. (2004): Development Psychology : A Life-Span Approach (5th Ed.) New Delhi
: Tata Mc Graw –Hill Publishing company Ltd.
12. Kundu, C.L. & Tutoo, D.N. (1989): Educational Psychology, New Delhi : Sterling Publishers
Pvt. Ltd.
13. Mangal, S.K. (2006): Advanced Educational Psychology, New Delhi : Prentice-Hall of India.
14. Mathur, S.S., (1986) :Educational Psychology, Revised and Enlarged Text Edition,. Vinod
Pustak Mandir, Agra.
15. Mazur, J.E. (1994): Learning and Behaviour (3rd Ed.), Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey :
Prentice Hall.
16. Biggee Morris C.(1971): and Row, Learning Theories for Teachers, 2nd Edition, N.Y.
Harper.
17. Dececco John, P.(1968): The Psychology of Learning and Instruction, Prentice Hall of India,
New Delhi.
18. Gagne Peter(1965): M., Conditions of Learning, N.Y.Hall.
19. Hilgard, E.R. and Bower, S.H.(1975) : Theories of Learning, Cliffs, Prentice Hall.
20. Lazrus Richard S.(1963) : Personality and Adjustment, , Cliffs, Prentice Hall.
21. Vargas, J.S. (1977) : Behaviour Psychology for Teachers, , New York, Harper Row.
22. Wang, M.C., Walber, H.J.(eds.)( 1985): Adapting Instruction to Individual Differences,.
Berkeley Cal Mg. Cutchan.
23. Woolfolk, Anita, E.( 1987): Educational Psychology, 3rd edition, , Englewood Cliffs,
Prentice Hall.
24. Woolfolk, Anita, E.( 1993): Readings and Cases in Educational Psychology, , Boston, Alyn
and Bacon.
25. Hall, C.S. and Lindsey(1976): Theories of Personality, John Wiley & Sons.
37
26. Zohar Danah & Jan Marshall (2001), Spiritual Intelligence the Ultimate Intelligence, New
York : Bloomsbury Publishing.
PAPER-III METHODOLOGY OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATIONAL
STATISTICS-II
Total Marks: 100
ExternalTheory: 80
Internal Assessment: 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be able to:
• select the tools for studying for studying different variables.
• select/ formulate the design of the study by controlling and classifying the variables
demanded by the design.
• develop the synopsis for research work.
• report the research work is accordance with the current trends and procedure of report writing.
• select and conduct the statistical analysis of the data by applying the statistics suitable for the
problem
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (question
no. 9) covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
a) Characteristics of tools : Reliability, Validity, Meaning and methods.
b) Tools : Psychological tests, Observations, Questionnaire, Interviews, Rating Scales, Attitudes
Scales (Thurstone and Likert’s Scale).
UNIT-II
a ) Methods of Research:
i. Historical Research: Meaning, Steps with emphasis on internal and external criticism.
ii. Descriptive Research: Meaning, Types with special reference to surveys, case study,
Correlation, Longitudinal and Cross sectional studies, trend studies and predictive studies.
b) i) Experimental Research: Meaning, Steps and Threats to internal and external validity,
ii) True Experimental designs: Two Groups Randomized subjects Post Test only designs, Two
Groups Randomized matched subjects Post Test only designs , Randomized groups Pre-Test
Post-Test designs, Factorial designs, Quasi-experimental designs: Rotational Design,
Nonrandomized groups Pre Test-Post test Design.
iii) Research Report
UNIT-III
Significance of statistics and significance of difference between statistics (mean only).
38
UNIT-IV
i) Analysis of variance (one way only).
ii) Chi-square list.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Ary, Donald and Jacob (1976): Introduction of Statistics, Purpose and Procedures, New
York, Holt Rinehart and Winston.
2. Best, J.W. & Kahan J.V. (1995): Research Education, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. :td., New
Delhi.
3. Edwards, A.L. (1960): Experimental Design in Psychological Research, New York, Holts
(revised ed.).
4. Gakhar, S.C. (2008) :Statistics in Education and Psychology, Panipat . N.M Publications.
5. Garrett, H.E. (1986) :Statistics in Psychology and Education, Vikils Feffers and Simons Pvt.
Ltd.
6. Kaul Lokesh(1984) :Methodology of Educational Research, Vikas Publishing House Pvt.
Ltd., New Delhi.
7. Lindquist, E.F.(1953) : Design and Analsis of Experiments in Education and Psychology,
Houghton Mifflin Co., Boston.
8. Siegel Sidney(1965) : Non-Parametric Statistics, McGraw Hill Books Company, New York.
9. Tuckman, B.W.(1972) : Conducting Educational Research, Harcourt Brace, Javanovich.
10. Verman, M.(1965) : Introduction to Educational and Psychological Research, Lond. Asia.
11. Lindquist, E.F. (1960) : Elementary Statistical Methods in Psychology and Education Oxford
Book Company, New Delhi.
PAPER IV & V, VI (SPECIALISATION)
OPTION A: GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING-II
Total Marks: 100
External Theory: 60
Internal Assessment: 20
Practical: 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be able to :
• Explain approaches of counselling.
• Explain skills of counselling.
• Describe non-testing techniques.
• Explain relevance of theories of counselling.
• develop the skill of administration and interpretation of Psychological tests.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (question
no. 9) covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
39
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions will carry equal marks
COURSE CONTENT:
Part-I (Theory)
UNIT-I
a) Approaches of counselling: Directive, Non-directive and Eclectic counselling.
b) Counsellor- Characteristics, Functions and Ethics.
c) Skills of Counselling- Building trust, Listening, Observation and Empathy.
UNIT-II
Theories of Counselling:
a) Freud’s Psychoanalytic.
b) Behaviouristic.
c) Gestalt.
UNIT-III
a) Importance of non-testing techniques for student appraisal.
b) Interview, Observation, Case study, Anecdotal record and cumulative record as techniques of
student appraisal.
UNIT-IV
a) Evaluating guidance programme.
b) Recent trends of Guidance and Counselling in India .
PRACTICAL :
a) Administration and interpretation of D.A.T and Teaching Aptitude Test.
b) Application of any one non-testing technique for counselling purpose.
c) Report of visit to the following places:
(i) Employment Exchange.
(ii) Guidance and Counselling Centres.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
40
1. Arbucle, D.S.(1965) : Counselling : Philosophy, Theory and Practice, Boston, Allyn and
Bacon.
2. Bantole, M.D.(1984) : Guidance and Counselling, Bombay, Sheth and Sheth Publications.
3. Blocher, D.H.(1987) : The Professional Counsellor, N.Y. Macmillan.
4. Burnard, P. (2005), Counselling Skills Training, New Delhi : Viva Book Private Limited.
5. Dryden, W. and Filethaman C. (1994) : Developing Counsellor Training, London, Sage.
6. D.G.E. & T., Pumphlets Publications, Ministry of Labour, Govt. of India.
7. Gelso, C.J. and Fretz, B.R.(1995): Counselling Psychology. Prisin Book, Banglore.
8. George, R.l. and Critiani T.S.(1990) : Counselling Theory and Practice, New Jersey, Prentice
Hall.
9. Ghosh J. (1995) : Vocational Guidance, New Delhi, U.S.S. Publication.
10. Gibson, Robert L. & Mitchell, Marianne, H. (2007), Introduction to Counselling and
Guidance, Pearson Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.
11. Jones, A.J. et. Al (1970), Principles of Guidance, New York : Mcgraw Hill Book Company.
12. Leuis, M.D., Mayer, R.L. and Louis, J.A.(1986) : An Introduction to Counselling, Profession,
illinas, F.E. Peacock Publishers.
13. Myers, G.E.(1948) : Principles and Techniques of Vocational Guidance. London., Mcgraw
Hills Company.
14. Pietrofa, J.J., Hoffman, A. & Splete, H.H. (1984), Counselling : An Introduction, Boston
Houghton Mifflin Company.
15. Petterson, G.H.(1962) : Counselling and Guidance in Schools, London., Mcgraw Hill Book
Company.
16. Saxena, A (2007), Modern Techniques of counselling, New Delhi : Rajat Publications.
17. Shertzer, B. and Stone S.C.(1974) : Fundamentals of Counselling, Boston, Houghton Mifflin
Co.
18. Shertzer, B., and Stone S.G. (1980) : Fundamentals of Guidance. Boston, Houghton Mifflin
Co.
19. Tolbert, E.L.(1978) : An Introduction to Guidance, Toronto, Little Brown and Company.
OPTION B: ADULT AND CONTINUING EDUCATION-II
Total Marks: 100
External Theory: 60
Internal Assessment: 20
Practical: 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be able to :
• Aware of the concept of andragogy and its applications.
• Able to analyse implications of andragogy.
• Acquainted with the programmes of adult and continuing education in India.
• aware of the administration and management of adult education in India.
• Able to understand the role of universities in adult and continuing education.
• Oriented for the research in Adult Education, Continuing Education and Life Long Education.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (question
no. 9) covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory. All
questions carry equal marks.
41
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT – I
a) Andragogy : meaning and concept, implication for lifelong learning.
b) Principles of adult learning and curriculum development for adults.
UNIT– II
a) Psychology of adult learners.
b) Teaching methods for adult learners.
UNIT– III
a) Centre and State Level organisations for Administration and management of adult and
continuing education programmes.
b) Role of UGC and Universities in adult, continuing and lifelong education.
(i) Department/Centre for adult and continuing education and extension education.
(ii) The field outreach programmes
UNIT– IV
a) Continuing education programmes for community development:
(i) Women empowerment
(ii) Population education
(iii) Legal literacy
(iv) Vocational education
b) Research Areas in Adult Education, Continuing Education and Lifelong Education.
PRACTICAL:
Planning a target specific continuing education course and submission of a detailed course draft.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Alford, Harold J. (1968), Continuing education in action : residential centres for lifelong
learning. New York : Wiley
2. Belanger, P., Gelpi, E. (1995) Lifelong Education, London, Kluwer Academic Publishers.
3. Indian Journal of Adult Education, 69, 3, 2008.
4. Indian Journal of Adult Education, 69, 4, 2008.
5. International Journal of Adult and Lifelong Education 68, 1-2, 2007.
6. International Journal of Adult and Lifelong Education 68, 3-4, 2007.
7. International Journal of Adult and Lifelong Education Vol. No. 1, 2003, UNESCO & UNDP
Documents and Publications.
42
8. Jarvis, Peter(1990)), International dictionary of adult and continuing education, London,
Routledge.
9. Jethither, Bhart, (1996)Adult Education & Extension. New Delhi : APH Publishers..
10. New Frontiers in Education-International Journal of Education, Vol. XXXII, No.2. April-June
2002.
11. Pareek, Vijay Kumar, (1992)Adult Education. Delhi. Himansher.
12. Patil, S.P.(1996), Problems of adult education programme – Ambala Cantt. Associated Pubs.,
13. Rahi, A.L. (1996.)Adult Educational Policies and Programmes, Ambala Cantt. Associated
Pubs.,
14. Rao, D.S. (1993) Continuing Education in India, Ambala, The Associated Publishers
15. Rao, V. Janardhana,( ., 2000.) Problem of Continuing Education, New Delhi: Discovery Pub
16. Reddy, G. Lokanadha, (1997.)Role performance of adult education teachers : problems and
prospects – New Delhi : Discovery Pub.,
17. Roy, Nikhil Ranjan, (1967.)Adult Education in India and Abroad – Delhi : Chand,
18. Seetharamu, A.S. & Devi, M.D. Usha, (1994)Adult Education, New Delhi : Ashish,
19. Sharma, Inder Prabha, (1985)Adult Education in India : Policy Perspective – New Delhi :
NBO Pub.,.
20. Singh, U.K., Sudarshan, K.N. (1996) Non-formal and Continuing Education, New Delhi,
Discovery Publishing House.
21. Singh, U.K., Nayak, A.K. (1997) Lifelong Education, New Delhi, Commonwealth Publishers.
22. Slowey Maria & Watson David (2003), Higher Education and the Life Course, Berkshire
England : Open University Press, Mc Graw-Hill Education.
23. Sodhi, T.S., (1987)Adult Education : a multidisciplinary approach, Ludhiana : Katson Pub.
House,.
24. UGC Guidelines of Lifelong Learning and Extension (2007-2012), University Grants
Commission : New Delhi.
25. UNDP (2006) Human Development Report 2006, New York, Oxford University Press.
26. Venkataiah, S. (2000) Lifelong Continuing Education, New Delhi, Anmol Publications Pvt.
Ltd.
27. Ward, Kevin & Taylor, Richard eds.( 1986.), Adult Education and the working class :
Education for the missing millions. London : Croom Helm,
28. Yadav, Rajender Singh(1991), Adult Education Training and Productivity, Ambala Cantt.
Indian Publications,.
OPTION C: VALUE EDUCATION & HUMAN RIGHTS -II
Total Marks : 100
Internal Marks : 80
External Marks : 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be able to :
• Able to understand the nature of values, moral values, moral education and to differentiate
such values from religious, moral training or moral indoctrination.
• Oriented to the various intervention strategies for moral education and moral learning.
• Acquainted the students with various types of human rights.
43
• Able to gain knowledge about various provisions in schools and means for protecting child
rights.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question
(question no. 9) covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory.
All questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
Moral Learning and Moral Education:
(i) Moral learning outside the school- child rearing practices and Moral learning via
limitation, Nature of society and moral learning, Media and Moral Learning.
(ii) Moral Learning inside the school: providing “form” and “content” to education.
(iii) Moral education and the curriculum: Various approaches.
UNIT-II
Intervention Strategies for Moral Education and Assessment of Moral Maturity:
a) Model of Moral Education:
i) Rationale Building Model.
ii) The Consideration Model.
iii) Value classification Model.
iv) Social action Model.
v) Just Community Intervention Model.
b) Assessment of moral maturity via moral dilemma resolution.
UNIT-III
Various Types of Rights- Civil, Political, Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.
UNIT-IV
Child Rights in India and their protection:
i) Provisions in schools.
ii) Teacher Preparation for Protecting Human Rights.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Karan, Reddy & V. Narakyan (1979), Education and Value, New Delhi : B.R. Publishers
cprpn.
2. Symonides, J(2002) Human Rights Concept and Standards, Rawat Publications.
3. Mohanty, J(2005) Teaching of Human Rights: New Trends and Innovations. New Delhi,
Deep and Deep Publications PVT. LTD.
44
4. Tarrow, N.B(1987), Human Rights and Education Vol-3, Programon Press.
5. Pandey, V.C(2005), Value Education and Education for Human Rights : Delhi, Isha Books.
6. Bhatt, S.R. (1986), Knowledge, Value and Education : An Axionoetic Analysis, Delhi : Gian
Publisher.
7. Josta, Hari Ram (1991), Spiritual Values and Education, Ambala Cantt : Associated
Publishers.
8. Kar., N.N. (1996), Value Education : A Philoshophical Study, Ambala Cantt : Associated
Publishers.
OPTION-D: COMPARATIVE EDUCATION-II
Total Marks : 100
Internal Marks : 80
External Marks : 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be able to :
• Explain the role of Comparative Education in globalised world.
• Describe the development stages of Comparative Education.
• Understand the structure of Education in different countries.
• Compare and contrast the educational systems of U.S.A, China and India.
• Compare the objectives, curriculum, administration and control in educational in U.S.A,
China and India
• Understand the recent trends and innovations of above mentioned countries.
• Analyse the type of educational problems faced by different countries.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (question
no. 9) covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory.
All questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
1. Role of Comparative Education-Need and importance of comparative education in globalized
world.
2. Development stages of comparative education.
UNIT-II
1. Educational ladder to U.S. A. And China with special reference to India.
2. Salient features of educational system of U.S.A and China.
UNIT-III
1. Objectives of education at each stage and curriculum in general in U.S.A. and China.
2. System of admission and evaluation at different stages of education in U.S.A. and China.
UNIT-IV
1. Educational problems at each stage in above mentioned countries.
2. Recent trends and innovations in education of above mentioned countries.
45
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Beredy, G.Z.F.(1964), Comparative Methods in Education, Oxford & East Publishing Co.,
New Delhi.
2. Blavic, Emile (1987), Primary Education : Development and Reform, Perspectives in
Education, Vol. 3, No. 3, 153-60.
3. Carlton, R., Colley and Machinnon (1977), Educational Change and Society, Toronto, Gage
Educational Publishing.
4. Carnoy, M.H.Levin (1985), Schooling and Work in the Democratic State, Stanford University
Press, Standford, California.
5. Cantor, Leonard(1989), The Re-visioning of Vocational Education in American High School,
Journal of Comparative Education, Vol.25, Number 2.
6. Dearden. R.F.(1970), The Philosophy of Primary Education. The English Language Book
Society & Routledge and Kegan Paul Ltd., Broadway House, London.
7. Dent, H.C.(1961), The Educational System of England and Wales, University of London
Press Ltd., Warwick Square London & C.V.
8. Epstein, Erwin, H., (1987), Against the Currents : ACritique of Ideology in Comparative
Education, Compare, 17, No. 1.
9. Green, J.L. (1981), Comparative Education and Global Village, Anu Book, Shivaji Road,
Meerut.
10. Georgie, D.M. (1978), Education in Modern Egypt : Ideals and Realities, Routledge and
Kegan Paul; London, Hexley and Boston.
11. Hans, Nicholas (1965), Comparative Education, Routledge and Kegan Paul Ltd., London.
12. James, H.R. & Mathew, A. (1988), Development of Education System in India, D.K.
Publisher Distributors (P.) Ltd., Ansari Road, Daryaganj, New Delhi.
13. Jangira, N.K.(1986), Special Education Scenario in Britain and India : Issues, Practice,
Perspective Indian Documentation, Service Book Seller and Publishers, Patel Nagar, P.B. No.
13, Gurgaon.
14. Sharma, Y.K. (2004), Comparative Education – A Comparative Study of Educational
systems, New Delhi : Kanishka Publishers.
15. Sodhi, T.S., A Text Book of Comparative Education, New Delhi : Vikas Publishing House
Pvt. LTd.
16. Choube, S.P. and Choube, A. (1993), Comparative Education, New Delhi : Vikas Publishing
House Pvt. LTd.
17. Rao, V.K.and Reddy, R.S. (2004), Comparative Education, New Delhi : Commonwealth
Publishers.
18. Sharma, R.N. (2008), Comparative Education, New Delhi : Surjeet Publications, Kamla
Nagar.
19. Choube, S.P., Features of Comparative Education, Agra : Vinod Pustak Mandir.
20. Sharma, R.A. (2007), Comparative Education, Meerut: R.Lall Book Depot.
21. Sharma, R.A. (2005), Comparative Perspective on Education, Jaipur : ABD Publishers,
Imliwala Phatak.
22. Sharma, R.A. (2008), Tulnatamak Adhyan Shikha, R.Lall Book Depot, Meerut (HINDI
VERSION).
23. Rawat, Dubey and Upadhayaya (2008), Compartive Education, Agra : Radha Krishan
Mandir.
46
OPTION-E-TEACHER EDUCATION-II
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be able to :
• Familiarize themselves with programmes of faculty improvement, performance appraisal and
of their methods of recruitment and selection.
• Explain innovations in teachers education programme.
• Highlights the areas of research in teacher-education programme and understand the problems
faced in the areas of teacher-education.
• To compare the teacher-education programme of USA, UK and India.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (question
no. 9) covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory.
All questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
Selection and Recruitment of Teachers:
a) Planning for selection and recruitment.
b) Selection criteria and modes of selection.
c) Appointments terms and their service conditions (temporary, contract,permanent)
d) Induction.
UNIT-II
a) Competency and commitment based teacher education :Competencies needed for emerging
role of teachers in the 21st Century.
b) Performance appraisal of teachers.
c) Faculty improvement : Concept, Programmes & Their relevance.
UNIT-III
a) International Trends in Teacher Education USA, U.K. and India.
b) Research and Innovations in Teacher Education: Privatisation of TE, Community Partnership,
Effective classroom strategies, Professionalism in Teachers at different levels.
UNIT-IV
a) Problems encountered in teacher education:
i. Quality control of Teacher Education.
ii. Teacher education and practicing school.
iii. Isolation of teacher education institutions.
iv. Code of Ethics for Teachers.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
47
1. Aggarwal, J.C.(1984). Landmark in the History of Modern India Education, Vikas Publishing
House, Ansari Road, New Delhi-110002.
2. Chaurasia, G.(1976). New Era in Teacher Education, N.Delhi.
3. Govt., of India (1992), Report of C.A.B.E. Committee, Department of Education, New Delhi.
4. Devedi,Prabhakar (1990). Teacher Education- a Resource Book, N.C.E.R.T., New Delhi.
5. Govt. of India (1966). Education and National Development, Report of Education
Commission, N.Delhi.
6. Govt. of India, Department of Education, Ministry of Human Resource and
Development(1986). N.P.E.(1986).
7. Khan, Mohd. Sharif (1983). Teacher Education in india and Abroad, Sheetal Printing Press,
Karol Bagh, New Delhi-110005.
8. Kohli, V.K.(1992). Teacher Education in India, Vivek Publishers, Ram Nagar, Ambala.
9. Mishra, K.S.(1993). Teachers and their Education, Assosicated Publication, N.Delhi.
10. Mohanty, J.N.(1993). Adult and National Education, Deep and Deep Publication, N.Delhi.
11. Mohanty , J.N.(1988). Modern Trends in India Education, Deep and Deep Publication,
N.Delhi.
12. N.I.E.P.A. (1984). Report on Status of Teachers, N.Delhi, National Institute of Educational
Planning and Administration.
13. Rao, D.B. (1988), Teacher Education in India, New Delhi : Discovery Publishing House.
14. Sharma, R.A. (2005), Teacher Education, Meerut : Loyal Book Depot.
15. Sharma, S.P. (2005), Teacher Education, New Delhi : Kanishka Publisher.
16. Singh, L.C(1983). Third National Survey of Scholastic Education in India, N.C.E.R.T.,
N.Delhi.
17. Srivastava, R.C & Bose K. (1973). Theory & Practice of Teaching Education in India, Chugh
Publication 2 Strachey Road, Allahabad.
18. Stones & Morris (1973). Teaching Practice Problems and Prospectives, Mathuen & Co.,
London.
19. Udayveer (2006), Modern Teacher Training, New Delhi : Anmol Publications.
20. Unesco, School Based in Service Training Bangkok.
OPTION F: SPECIAL EDUCATION-II
Total Marks :100
External Marks: 60
Internal Marks: 20
Practical : 20(internal)
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be able to :
• develop awareness about concept and educational provisions for cerebral palsy and muscular
dystrophy.
• understand concept, etiology and educational implications of visual and hearing impairment.
• learn about the concept, identifications and intervention strategies for children with autism.
• familiarize themselves with the concept of speech impairment.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (9th )
covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
48
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory.
All questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
1. Cerebral Palsy: Concept, classification, characteristics, needs and problems, educational
implications.
2. Muscular Dystrophy- Concept, nature and educational implications.
UNIT-II
Visual Impairment :
a) Definition, characteristics, causes, prevention and problems
b) Educational provisions, Role of Technology in education and mobility
UNIT-III
Hearing Impairment :
a) Definition, characteristics, causes and classification.
b) Prevention and Educational provisions.
UNIT-IV
a) Autism: Concept, Nature, Identification Educational provisions and intervention.
b) Speech Impairment: Concept, Classification, causes and available interventions.
PRACTICAL WORK: Marks : 20
A case study in any area of disability in prescribed format with short term and long
term plans. Report on visit to a special school.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Advani, L. & Chadha, A. (2003), You & Your Special Child, New Delhi : UBS Publishers &
Distributors.
2. Berdine, W.H., Blackhurst, A.E. (eds.) (1980), An Introduction to Special Education, Little,
Brown and Company, Boston.
3. Encyclopedia of Special Education (1987), Vol. 1,2,3 Cecil R. Reynolds & Lester Mann
(Eds.), New York : John Wiley & Sons.
4. Frank, M.H. & Steven, R.F. (1984), Education of Exceptional Learners, Allyn & Bacon, Inc.,
Massachusetts.
5. Hallahan, D.P. & Kauffman, J.M. (1991), Exceptional Children—Introduction to Special
Education, Allyn & Bacon, Massachusetts.
6. Hans, I.J. (2000), Children in Need of Special Care, Human Horizons Series, Souvenir Press
(E & A Ltd.).
7. Kirk, S.A. & Gallagher, J.J. (1989), Education of Exceptional Children, Houghton Mifflin
Co., Boston, 1989.
49
8. Panda, K.C. (1997), Education of Exceptional Children, New Delhi : Vikas Publising House.
9. Ysseldyke, J.E. and Algozzine, B. (1998), Special Education, New Delhi, Kanishka
Publishers, Distributor.
OPTION G: EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY-II
Total Marks : 100
External : 60
Internal : 20
Practical/ Sessional Work : 20(external)
COURSE OBJECTIVES: At the end of the course, students will be able to:
• Explain the concept, principles and styles of Programming.
• Explain development of programmed Instructional Material.
• Discuss concept of mastery learning and in historical perspective
• Discriminate between characteristics and limitations of Bloom’s and Keller’s mastery
learning strategies
• Discuss concept, characteristics and selection of media with special reference to computers
multi-media and mass media.
• Explain the concept, types and tools of evaluation
• Describe the procedure of developing and validating CRT and NRT
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (9th )
covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory.
All questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT- I
Individualized Instructions:
a) Programmed Instructions: Concept, historical development, Theoretical rationale of
Programming, Principles and styles of programmed instruction.
b) Development of a linear programme.
UNIT-II
a) Mastery learning: Concept, historical perspectives, characteristics, limitations of Bloom and
Keller’s Mastery learning strategies.
b) Computer assisted instruction.
UNIT-III
a) Instructional Media: Concept, characteristics selection of media.
b) Multimedia, mass media for formal and non-formal systems of education.
50
UNIT-IV
Evaluation: Concept and Types of evaluation, characteristics and difference between norm referenced
and criterion referenced Tests.
Development and validation of CRT and NRT.
Sessional Work:
1. Development of a Linear programme with 50 to 100 frames.
2. Construct at least 20 test items of different types.
3. Power-point presentation on any topic.
BOOKS SUGGESTED:
1. Ahuja, M. (2007), Mastery Learning A Practical Approach, Vivek Publishers : Meerut, (2nd
ed.).
2. Bhushan,A & Ahuja, M.(2003) Educational Technology, Bawa Publishers, Patiala. (2nd
ed.).
3. Bigge, M.L. & Hunt, M.(1968), Psychological Foundation of Education, London, Harper and
Row Publishers.
4. Bloom, B.S.(1972) Taxonomy of Education Objectives. A Hand Book-I(Cognitive Domain),
New York: Devid Mokeay Campo.
5. Chauhan, S.S. (1978) A Textbook of Programmed Instruction, New Delhi, Sterling
Publishers.
6. Das, R.C.(1993), Educational Technology : A Basic Text, New Delhi, Sterling Publishers.
7. Dececco, J.P. & Cramford, W.R., (1970). Psychology of Learning and Instructions, Prentice
Hall of India Pvt. Ltd.
8. Flanders, Ned A.(1978), Analysing Teaching Behaviour, London , Addison Wesley
Publishing Co.
9. Gage, N.L., 1978. The Scientific Basis of the Art of Teaching, London, Teacher’s College
Press.
10. Joyce, B.Weil, M. & Showers, B., (1985). Models of Teaching, Prentice Hall of India, Pvt.
Ltd.
11. Mehra, V.(2010), A text book of Educational Technology, New Delhi : Sanjay Prakashan.
OPTION H: MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION-II
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, the student will be able to :-
• acquaint themselves with the new trends of examination reforms.
• enable themselves in learning the applications of advanced statistical techniques in
education.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (question
no. 9) covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory.
All questions carry equal marks.
51
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
New trends in examination reforms:
a) Grading system.
b) Semester system.
c) Continuous and comprehensive internal assessment.
d) Question Banks.
e) Uses of computers in evaluation.
UNIT-II
Correlations: Assumptions and computation of:
a) Biserial
b) Point Biserial
c) Tetrachoric
d) Phi-Coefficient
UNIT-III
I Measurement of:
a) Aptitude
b) Attitude
II Partial and multiple correlation-meaning and computation.
UNIT-IV
a) Regression and prediction : Meaning and Computation of linear regression equation(one and
two predictors only).
b) Elementary factor analysis: Meaning, Centroid method of extra ting factors (two factors
only), Interpretation of factors.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Anastasi,, A.(1988) :Psychological Testing. The Macmillan Co., New York, 6th Ed.
2. Ebel, L.R. and Fristrie, D.A. (1991) : Essentials of Educational Measurement, Prentice Hall
of India Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
3. Freeman, F.S. (1965) : Theory & Practice of Psychological Testing,) New york : Rinehart &
Winston,
4. Garrett, H.E. (1973): Statistics in Education and Pshychology, Bombay, Vakils Febber and
Simons,
5. Guilford, S.P. and Fruchtor, B.(1973) : Fundamental Statistics in Pshychology and Education
5th Ed., McGraw Hill and Co., New York.
6. Popham, W.J.(1988) : Educational Evalution, Prentice Hall, New Delhi.
7. Thorndike, R.L. and Hagen E.(1977) : Measurement and Evaluation on Psychology and
Education. John Wiley and Sons, Inc. New York.
8. Aiken, L.R. (1985) : Psychological Testing and Assessment, Boston : Allyn and Bacon,
9. Gronlund, N.E. (1981) : Measurement and Evaluation in Teaching, New York: Macmillan,
10. Karmel, L.C & Karmel, M.C.(1978) : Measurement and Evaluation in Schools, New York:
Macmillan.
11. Mehrens, W.A. & Lehmann, I.J. (1984): Measurement and Evaluation in Education and
Psychology, New York : Holt, Rinehart, Winstom
52
12. Aggarwal, Y.P.(1989): Statistical Methods Concepts Application & Computation, New Delhi
: Sterling
13. Guilford, J.P.(1978) : Fundamental Statistics in Psychology and Education, New York:
McGraw Hills, 6th Ed.
14. Cronbach, L.G.(1964) : Essentials of Psychological Testing, New York : Harper,
15. Aggarwal, R.N. & Vipin Asthana(1983): Educational Measurement & Evaluation, Agra :
Vinod Pustak Mandir,
OPTION I: CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT-II
Total Marks: 100
External Marks: 60
Internal Marks: 20
Sessional Work: 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, students will be able to:
• understand the concept and need of curriculum design
• describe characteristic features of different designs of curriculum development
• understand the various models of curriculum engineering
• appraise present curriculum of Indian schools
• discuss curriculum issues and trends of curriculum design
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (question
no. 9) covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory.
All questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT – I
a) Concept of curriculum design
53
b) Need of theory of curriculum design.
UNIT– II
Features of different curriculum designs:
a) Subject – Centered curriculum
b) Experience and activity centered curriculum
c) Core curriculum
UNIT– III
Models of curriculum engineering
a) The administrative model
b) The grass – roots model
c) Systems analysis model
UNIT– IV
a) Critical appraisal of present curriculum in elementary and secondary schools in India
b) Curriculum issues and trends
SESSIONAL WORK:-
Critical appraisal of curriculum of Senior Secondary Stage (Any one subject)
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Annuing, Angela (1995), “A National Curriculum for the Early Years”, Open University
Press, Buckingham, Philadelphia.
2. Audrey & Howard Nocholls(1978), “Developing Curriculum”, A practical guide- George
Allen & Unwin, Boston, Sydney, London.
3. Davies I.K. (1976), “Objectives in Curriculum Design”, Mcgraw Hill Book Company
Limited, England.
4. Denis Lawton(1986), “School curriculum planning”.Hodder & Stonghton, London, Sydney.
5. Edward, A.Krug(1960), The Secondary School Curriculum”, Harper and Row Publishers,
New York & Evauston.
6. Erickson, H.Lynn(1998),”Concept-based curriculum and instruction, Corwin Press,Inc.
7. Goodson, Iron. F. (1994), Studying Curriculum”, Open University Press, Buckingham.
8. Hugh Sockett (1976), ”Designing the curriculum,” Open Books London,
9. Leece, Joseph & others(1961), “The Teacher in Curriculum”.
10. Lewy, Aneh (1991), “Studying Curriculum”, Open University Press, Buckingham.
11. Omstein, Allen C.A., “Curriculum Foundations, Principles and Issues”, Prentice Hall
International Ltd., London.
12. Pratt, David(1980), “Curriculum Design and Development”, Harcourt Brace and World Inc.,
New York.
13. Romiszowski, A.J(1986), “Designing Instructional System-Decision making in Course
Planning & Design”.
14. Saylor & Alexander,(1960).”Curriculum Planning”,Holt Linchart & Winston, New York
15. Smith, Stawey & Shores,(1957),”Curriculum Development”, World Book Co.
16. Solomon, Pearl G.,(1998), “ The Curriculum Bridgo”, Corwin Press Inc.
17. Tyler,R.W.(1974), “Basic Principles of Curriculum and Instruction,”OpenUniversity Pub.,
London.
18. Vernon,E. Anderson(1962),”Principles and Procedures of Curriculum Improvement”.
54
19. Zais, R.S.(1976),”Curriculum Principles and Foundations”, Harper & Row Pub., London.
OPTION J : ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION-II
Total Marks : 100
External Marks : 60
Internal Marks : 20
Practical : 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, students will be able to :
• exhibit the relationship between man and environment.
• explain the impact of manmade and natural disasters on environment..
• explain the role of educational institutions in disaster management..
• discuss the importance of sustainable development.
• explain the features of curriculum for environmental education at school.
• Describe different methods of teaching environmental education
• Explain various global environmental problems.
• Explain strategies for waste management.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (question
no. 9) covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory.
All questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT – I
a) Relationship between man and environment.
b) Effect of man made and natural disaster on environment.
c) Role of educational institutions in disaster management.
UNIT– II
a) Features of curriculum for environmental education at primary and secondary school levels.
b) Concept and importance of sustainable development.
UNIT– III
a) Interdisciplinary and integration approaches for teaching environmental education.
b) Methods of teaching environmental education, Discussion, seminar, workshop, dialogue,
problem solving, field survey, projects, exhibition and experiential learning.
55
c) Role of media for imparting environmental education.
UNIT– IV
a) Global environmental problems : Global warming, ozone depletion, e-waste and population
explosion.
b) Waste Management : e-waste, medical waste, nuclear waste, solid and liquid waste.
PRACTICAL
1. Survey of attitude of students and teachers towards global environmental problems
2. Organization of any acitivity of enhancing environmental awareness.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Dani, H.M.(1986): Environmental Education, Chandigarh. Publication Bureau, Panjab
University,
2. Bhall,S.C. and Khanna, H.(2007), Environmental Education, New Delhi: Regal Publication.
3. Nagra, V. (2006), Environmental Education, Jalandhar : Sharma Publications.
4. Nanda, K.V. (1997), Environmental Education, New Delhi,: APH Publishing Corpn.
5. Nasrin (2007), Education, Environment and Society, New Delhi: APH Publishing Corpn.
6. Saxena, A.B. (1986), Environmental Education, Agra : National Psychological Corpn.
7. Sharma, R.C. (1981), Environmental Education, New Delhi : Metropolitan Book Co.,
8. Shrivastava, K.A.(2007), Global Warning, New Delhi: APH Publishing Corpn.
9. Shukla, K.S. and Srivastava, R.P. (1992), Emerging Pattern of Environmental Structure, New
Delhi: Commonwealth Publishers.
10. Singh, K.Y.(2005), Teaching of Environment Science, New Delhi: Chaman Enterprises
11. Sudhir, A.M. and Masillamani, M.(2003), Environmental Issues, New Delhi ; Reliance
Publishing Hourse.
OPTION K: YOGA EDUCATION-II
Total Marks : 100
External Marks : 60
Internal Marks : 20
Practical : 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES: After completing the course, students will be able to :
• Appreciate the role of yoga for healthy life.
• realize the role of yoga in the development of spiritual values.
• Understand the ailments and problems related to health.
• practice the prescribed Asana, Pranayamas and Shudhi Kriyas and establish his/her own yoga
centre.
• undertake research work.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (question
no. 9) covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
56
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory.
All questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENTS:
UNIT – I
1. Asanas : Meaning and definitions and benefits of Asanas.
2. Classification of Asanas, preparatory requirements, physiological consideration of mediative,
relaxative and cultural poses.
UNIT-II
1. Pranayama : Its meaning, technique and three phases of pranayama, classification of
pranayama (these are Ujjai, Surya Bhedan, Sitali, Bhastrika and Nadi Shodan) in respect of
Hath Yoga Pradipika and Patanjali Yoga Darshan.
2. Research in yoga: Present status, biomedical, psychological and educational research,
potential areas of research.
UNIT-III
1. Promotion of yoga: Role of yoga in the school curriculum, principles of effective
implementation of yoga in school curriculum.
2. Meditation: meaning and its concept as given in yoga darshan along with elementary
knowledge of various techniques of meditation, viz. Yoga nidra, Ajapa jap, Antah tratak,
Mantra jap, Meditation. Benefits of mediation in daily life with brief physiological aspects.
UNIT– IV
1. Yoga Therapy: Its meaning and scope, tools and principles of Yoga Therapy. Causes, sign
and symptoms and yogic treatment of Diabetes, Hypertension, Constipation, Cervical Spondelysis,
Common Cold, Backache, Obesity, Asthma and Gastric.
2. Concept of mitahara in yogic diet, various norms of yogic diet, according to Hath Pradipika.
Practical
1. Shudhi Kriyas : Vama Dhuti, Kapalbhati, Jal Neti, Suter Neti.
2. Asanas : Ardh-matseyendra, Janushirish, Supt-vajra, Taad,
Yoga Exerciese Trihak-Chakra, Katichakra, Kati-Bhujang, Udra-Akrashan
Cultural Paschimottan, Trikon.
3. Pranayama : Correct Deep Breathing in Respect of 1:2 ratio for Purks and
Rechka, 15-30 minutes practice for Nadishodhan,
Suryabhedhan, Ujjai, Sitali/Shitkari, Bhastrika.
4. Meditation : Prana dharna is shav asna, Ajapa jap, yog nidra, mantra japa
Meditation.
5.Viva – voce & Note Book*
The students have to prepare practical notebook in respect of introduction of Asanas, Pranayama,
Meditation, Kriyas and meaning, technique and benefit of of 5 Asanas, two Pranayama, two kriyas
and one Meditation.
57
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Swami Kuvalyananda Pranayama, (1983), Popular Prakashan, Bombay
2. Shri Yogendra Yoga; Personal Hygiene; The Yoga Institute,Bombay.
3. Yogeshwar, (1981)Text Book of Yoga, Free Indian Press, Madras.
4. I.K.Taimini(1979); The Science of Yoga, the Theosophical Publishing House Adyar, Madras,
India.
5. N.L.Dosanjh(1979), Psychotherapy including Yoga Therapy,(Science of Mental Healing)
Sanjeev Publications, Chandigarh.
6. Ragunath Safaya(1976); Indian Psychology, Munishram Manohar Lal Publishers Pvt. Ltd.,
54, Rani Jhansi Road, New Delhi.
7. B.K.S.Iyengar (1994), Light on Pranayam, Indus Publications, New Delhi.
8. H.K.Kaul(1991), Pranayamas for Health, Surjeet Publications, Delhi.
9. Swami Satyanand Saraswati (1995), Asana Pranayama Mudra Bandh, Bihar School of Yoga,
Munger.
10. Dr. Lajpat Rai, Dr.R.C.Sawhney, Dr.W.Selvamurthy (1998). Meditation Techniques, their
Scientific Evaluation, Anubhav Rai Publication, Gurgaon, Haryana.
OPTION L: EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT-II
Total Marks : 100
External Marks : 80
Internal Marks : 20
COURSE OBJECTIVES : After completing the course, students will be able to :
• Various concepts like planning, financing, supervision in Indian settings.
• Structure of educational administration at various government levels.
• concepts related to human resource management.
NOTE: Examiner will set 9 questions in all i.e. two each from four units and one question (question
no. 9) covering the entire syllabus will consist of four short answer type questions.
Students are required to attempt one question from each unit and question no. 9 is compulsory.
All questions carry equal marks.
COURSE CONTENT:
UNIT-I
58
Educational Authorities in India:
a) Role of centre, state and local bodies in educational administration.
b) Constitutional provisions, Centre-state relations on education.
c) Role of private enterprises, their limitations and remedial measures.
UNIT-II
Financing of education:
a) Meaning & importance
b) Financing policy at central, state and local levels.
c) Budgeting and preparation of budget estimates.
d) Problems & issues in financing education.
UNIT-III
Educational Planning:
a) Meaning and nature.
b) Approaches to planning.
c) Institutional planning.
d) Priority in planning.
UNIT-IV
Performance appraisal in the educational organizational at different levels (including self appraisal).
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Agarwal , V.Bhatnagar, R.P.( 1997), Supervision, Planning and Financing, Meerut, India :
Surya Publication,.
2. Chandrasekaran, P.( 1994.), Educational Planning and Management, New Delhi : Sterling
Publishers,
3. Greene, J.F.( 1975), School Personnel Administration, Chilton Book Company :
Pennysylvania,
4. Khan, N. Sharif & Khan, M. Saleem,( 1980) Educational Administration, New Delhi : Ashish
Publishing House,
5. Kuldip Kaur, Education in India(1981-1985), Policies, Planning and Implementation,
Chandigarh : Arun and Rajive Pvt. Ltd.,
6. Lulla, B.P. & Murthy, S.K.(1976), Essential of Educational Administration, Chandigarh :
Mohindra Capital Publishing.
7. Manju, Bala(1990), Leadership Behaviour and Educational Administration, New Delhi : Deep
& Deep Publications .
8. Mathur, S.S., Educational Administration and Management, Ambala Cantt. : Indian
Publicatons.
9. Mukherji, S.N.(1970), Administration and Educational Planning and Finance, Baroda :
Acharya Book Depot.
59
10. Philip H. Coomba,(1985) The World Crisis in Educatin, Oxford University Press, 1985.
11. Tara Chand and Ravi Prakash,(1997) Advanced Educational Administration, New Delhi :
Kanishka Publishers.
12. Thakur D. & Thakur, D.N.(1996), Educational Planning and Administration, New Delhi :
Deep and Deep Publications.
13. Thomas I Sergiovanni (1980) Educational Governance and Administration, America :
Prentice Hall,.
14. Trivedi, P.R. & Sudershan, K.N.( 1996.), Management Education, New Delhi : Discovery
Publishing House.
OPTION M: DISSERTATION-II
Total Marks : 200
External Marks : 150
Internal Marks : 50
1. Dissertation proposal submission on or before 30th Nov.
2. A completed dissertation will be submitted on 31st May of the year of examination. A vivavoce
will be held on the date announced by the University.
60
Assisstant Registrar (General Branch),
Panjab University,
Chandigarh.
Sir,
Kindly find enclosed herewith the syllabus of M.Ed (General), M.Ed. (Guidance &
Counselling) and M.Ed. (Educational Technology), M.A. (Education) and Post Graduate Diploma in
Research Methodology and Statistics approved by Board of Studies for the Session 2010-11.
Thank you,
Yours sincerely,
Prof. Malvinder Ahuja
Chairperson

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