Wednesday, 10 August 2011

SYLLABI FOR MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.) IN COMMUNITY EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF PUNJAB UNIVERSITY, CHANDIGARH

Admission criteria in this course shall be followed as being followed in other teaching departments of the University but since it is a new inter-disciplinary course of its kind being introduced in any of the Universities in India, a student having graduation degree in any discipline (Arts, Commerce and Science) with 50% marks (45% in the case of SC/ST) will be eligible to take admission in this course. Other rules and regulations applicable at the time of admission w.r.t. eligibility conditions, attendance, fee structure, Semester-wise fee etc. approved by the Panjab University Syndicate/Senate from time to time shall be strictly followed.
Objectives of the Course:
Community Education is an interdisciplinary course which would enable the students to understand the issues pertaining to community development at the national as well as at the global level. The basic idea behind this course is to make the students aware about the different facets of community life, theoretically, as well as practically. Community Education and Development as an independent discipline evolves from the realms of education and social sciences that caters to the communities in general socially marginalized, poor, deprived and disadvantaged sections in specific through experts trained for the purpose. Imparting training and building human resources is the need of the hour for the over- all development of the society by having partnership with state, civil society and NGOs etc. in an effort to bring all sections of society under the umbrella of community education and development.

Within this perspective the department undertakes two year Masters Degree course in Community Education and Development, which includes Education, Practice and Community work for preparing the students to work with individuals, institutions, state governments, multinational companies, families, groups and communities in a different community settings. This course intends to instill a sense of commitment and dedication among students towards Community Education and Development by addressing its various problems. The vision of the course lies in the ethos of community learning, concerns and context. It is intended to develop potential among the takers of this course to get employment in educational institutions to work as counselors, facilitators in government and non-government organizations, public health educators, human rights activists and other institutions devoted to the upliftment of the community.
GUIDELINES:
1.1. The duration of the course for the degree of Master of Arts (M.A.) in Community Education and Development shall be two years which would comprise of four Semesters of six months duration each and the number of working days for transacting curriculum shall not be less than 360 days.
2.1. A person who possesses the following qualifications shall be eligible to join the course:–
Minimum of 50% (45% in case of SC/ST) marks in B.A./B.Com/B.Sc or an equivalent degree at graduate level depending upon requirement of particular course, from a recognized University.
Admission will be done as per reservation policy of the University.
2.2. No one who is in employment (whole-time, part-time or honorary service) shall be allowed to join Master of Arts (M.A.) in Community Education and Development without taking
2
leave from his/her institution/office, etc. from the date of commencement of the academic session to the conclusion of his/her examination including Project Work/ Community Work / Field Work.
2.3. The Teaching learning pedagogy will be as follows: Lecture method, demonstrations, discussions, ICT techniques, field work, surveys, activity based Projects etc.
3.1. Only those students shall be eligible to appear in the examination who possess the qualification laid down in Regulation 2.1 and has attended the prescribed course of instruction during each semester in the academic year in the University and should also:
(i) be of good character;
(ii) have attended at least 75 per cent of (i) lectures and (ii) practicals separately in each paper during every semester proceeding the examination.
3.2. The deficiency in the attendance may be condoned as follows;
a) Up to 15% of the lectures delivered in a theory paper (s) to the best advantage of the student by Chairperson.
b) The Vice–Chancellor, in exceptional cases, on the recommendation of the Chairperson, may condone up to 10 lectures in a paper(s) to the best advantage of the student.
4.1. English shall be the medium of instruction, however, the medium of the examination shall be English, Hindi and Punjabi.
4.2 The examination shall be conducted at the end of each semester or as decided by the Vice-Chancellor.
4.3. The last date for receipt of Examination admission form with and without late fee shall be as prescribed by the Syndicate from time to time.
5. To be declared pass in a Semester Examination, a candidate must have obtained 40% marks in each theory paper, internal assessment and Project Work/ Community Work / Field Work separately.
6. (i) Promotion from 1st to 2nd , 2nd to 3rd and 3rd to 4th semester shall be allowed if a candidate has fulfilled the attendance and other requirements even though s/he has failed to appear in the examination for the semester respectively from which s/he is being promoted.
(ii) A candidate who gets reappear in paper(s) may pass the same in a total of two consecutive chances irrespective of promotion. However, where a student has cleared 80% of the papers of all the semesters preceding the semester in which he/she has to be admitted, he/she will be entitled to avail one more chance to clear the remaining papers on the recommendation of the Head/ Chairperson/ Co-coordinator, if the candidate fails to clear the remaining papers even after availing all these (three in all) chances, he/she will seek fresh admission in First Semester provided he/she is eligible as per rules
7.1. If the candidate fails in the internal assessment of theory, s/he shall have to rejoin the department for a period to be determined by the Chairperson, subject to a minimum of one month, in order to qualify in the internal assessment. If s/he passes in the internal assessment, s/he shall be deemed to have passed the examination. The marks obtained by the candidate in internal
3
assessment shall remain valid and will be carried forward even if s/he does not appear or fails in the written theory examination.
7.2. The student who fails in any paper will be allowed to appear in that particular paper only for a maximum of two times within two years with the same syllabus s/he appeared. If the student fails to pass the examination after two attempts, he/ she will be required to undergo the new course again.
7.3. A student who has failed in course/s of 3rd and/or 4th semester/s shall be eligible to clear the same in an additional examination in June/July and December/January respectively. The dates of the examination may be fixed by the Vice-Chancellor, if necessary, other than these months.
8. (i) A candidate who passes in Project Work/ Community Work / Field Work but fails in Theory shall be required to appear only in Theory.
(ii) A candidate who passes in Theory but fails in Project Work/ Community Work / Field Work, s/he will be required to reappear only in Project Work/ Community Work / Field Work in which s/he has failed. The candidate shall take the examination according to the old syllabus.
9. The students’ performance shall be evaluated continuously throughout the Course (Semester I, II, lll and lV). The guidelines for continuous assessment shall be followed as under:
(i) Theory Paper Evaluation - 80 Marks
(ii) Internal Assessment - 20 Marks, which includes:
a) Mid-term Examinations (Theory) - 5 Marks
b) Assignment/ Presentations -10 Marks
c) Participation in Classroom Discussion - 2 Marks
d) Attendance - 3 Marks
Which includes :
Attendance Below 75% - 0 mark
75% -80% - 1 mark
81% - 85% - 2 marks
86% and above - 3 marks
(iii) Project Work / Community Work / Field Work – 50 Marks
(a) In each semester, there will be a Project Work / Community Work / Field Work of 50 marks having 35 marks for report writing and 15 marks for viva-voce. The Project Work / Community Work / Field Work will be assessed internally.
b) Aggregate marks for each Semester will be 450 (400 for Theory and 50 for Project Work / Community Work / Field Work).
10.1. The Controller of Examinations shall publish the result of the examination within four weeks after the termination of the examination, or as soon thereafter as is possible. Merit list shall
4
be prepared on the basis of marks obtained in Theory, Internal Assessment and Project Work / Community Work / Field Work taken together.
10.2. Successful candidates shall be classified on the basis of the marks obtained by them in Theory and Project Work / Community Work / Field Work taken together:–
(a)
Those who obtain 75 percent or more of the aggregate marks.
:
First Division with Distinction
(b)
Those who obtain 60 percent or more but less than 75 percent of the aggregate marks.
:
First Division
(c)
Those who obtain 50 per cent or more but less than 60 per cent of the aggregate marks.
:
Second Division
(d)
Those who obtain 40 percent or more but less than 50 per cent of the aggregate marks.
:
Third Division
11. A candidate who has passed the Master of Arts (M.A.) in Community Education and Development examination from the Panjab University under the semester system may appear as a private candidate in a course/courses he wishes to, with a view to improving his performance. For this purpose, he may be given two chances, within a period of 5 years from the date of his passing the degree course. The candidate in the first instance shall be required to intimate all the courses in which he would like to improve his performance. He will then appear in the respective course/s at the main semester examination, i.e. for the course offered for First and Third semesters in the November/December examination and for the Second and Fourth semesters in April/May examination. If he does not improve his performance in any course/s, he shall be eligible to do so in the following year in the semester examination concerned which would be treated as a second chance. The candidate shall be charged fee as prescribed by the Syndicate from time to time for each course, subject to the maximum admission fee prescribed for the semester concerned.
12. The result of the candidate shall be declared only if s/he improves his/her performance.
13. Re- evaluation of the Papers shall be done as per University norms.
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks with NINE questions in all. The candidates shall be required to attempt FIVE questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 Short Answer Type Questions, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20 marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt FOUR Long Answer Type Questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60 marks)
5
SEMESTER-WISE COURSE CONTENTS
SEMESTER I
I
Community Structure and Development
II
Community Organization and Practice
III
Indian Social Structure
IV
Empowerment of Community – Different Perspectives
 Project Work/Community Work/Field Work
SEMESTER II
I
Community Social Psychology
II
Human Rights and Duties
III
Panchayati Raj System in India
IV
Human Resource Development and Training
 Project Work/Community Work/Field Work
SEMESTER III
I
Conflict Resolution
II
Research Methodology
III
Community Counselling
IV
Education and Life Long Learning
 Project Work/Community Work/Field Work
SEMESTER IV
I
Rural Development and Entrepreneurship
II
Urbanization and Slums
III
Population and Health Education
IV
Environmental Education and Disaster Management
 Project Work/Community Work/Field Work
6
SEMESTER – I
PAPER-I
COURSE TITLE
COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND DEVELOPMENT
Max. Marks: 100
Theory: 80 Marks
Int. Ass.: 20 Marks
Total credit points: 4
Time: 3 Hours
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks & shall comprise of nine questions. The candidates shall be required to attempt five questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 short answer type question, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20 marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt 4 long answer type questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60 marks)
Course Objectives:
i. This course intends to acquaint students with the concept of community & its related concepts.
ii. Various types of communities and their features.
iii. The concept of Community Development, Approaches and role of voluntary organizations.
iv. Type of voluntary agencies in development.
v. Community Development processes and its organizational channel.
7
Course Content:
Unit: I
Community: Meaning, Elements of Community, Nature, Principles and Relevance of Community, Types of community; Difference between community and: Neighborhood, Society, Association, Organization, and Institution.
Unit: II
Tribal Communities: Classification of tribes; Family & Kinship; Land Alienation & Forest relationship; Constitutional Safeguards for Scheduled Tribes.
Rural Communities: Agrarian Social Structure, Jajmani System; Rural family (Patriarchy).
Urban Communities: Urban Family; Rural-Urban Migration, Rural Urban Contrast, Influence on Rural Community.
Unit: III
Community Development: Meaning, Elements, Principles, Approaches; Role of Voluntary Organization; Types of Voluntary Agencies.
Unit: IV
Community Work: Meaning, Types of Community Development Programmes; Community development processes; Development and use of organizational channels.
Books Recommended:
1. Bhargava, Gopal (ed.): Urban Problems and Policy Perspectives. (New Delhi, Abhinav Publications; 1981)
2. Bhushan,V. & Sachdeva, D.R.: An Introduction to Sociology, (Allahabad, Kitab Mahal, 2006)
3. Desai, A.R.: Rural Sociology in India. (Popular Prakashan, Bombay, 1977)
4. Kumar. A: Tribal Development in India. (Sapru & Sons, New Delhi, 2002).
5. Madhrurima :‘Readings in Sociology’( New Academic Publishing Co., Jalandhar, 2008)
6. Mehta, S.R..: Rural Development: Policies and Programmes. (Sage Publications, New Delhi,1984)
7. Nelson, Lowry, et al. : ‘Community Structure and Change’ (The Macmillian Co. , New York, 1960)
8. Pfeffer, Georg & Behera, D.K. (eds.): Contemporary Society: Tribal Studies. Volumes 1 to 5. (Concept Publishing House, New Delhi, 1997).
8
9. Rao, M.S.A.: Urban Sociology in India: Reader and Source. (Orient Longmans Ltd., New Delhi, 1974)
10. Saraswati, B.N.: Brahmanic Ritual Traditions (Indian Institute of Advanced Studies, Simla, 1977)
11. Shankar Rao, C.N.: Sociology of Indian Society (S. Chand & Co. Ltd., New Delhi 2004).
12. Walter, C. Neala: Developing Rural India: Policies, Politics and Progress. (Allied Publishers, New Delhi, 1990)
13. Dahama,O.P.: Education and Communication for Development (Oxford & IBH Publishing co.pvt. LTD. New Delhi Calcutta,1999)
9
SEMESTER – I
PAPER-II
COURSE TITLE
COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION AND PRACTICE
Max. Marks: 100
Theory: 80 Marks
Int. Ass.: 20 Marks
Total Credit Points: 4
Time: 3 Hours
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks with nine questions in all. The candidates shall be required to attempt five questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 short answer type question, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt 4 long answer type questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60marks)
Course Objectives:
i. This course will enrich the students to understand the historical basis of community organization.
ii. The meaning and approaches of community organization.
iii. How to develop a plan of work for community.
iv. To acquaint the students with different methods used for organizing community.
v. To understand role of community organizer in building consensus around community issues.
vi. Integrating theory into practice by familiarizing through case studies.
10
Course Content:
Unit: I
Historical Perspectives of Community Organisation; Community Organisation: Concept, Principles, Basic Assumptions and Approaches; Gender Sensitive Community Organisation Practice: Gender, Caste and Class.
Unit: II
Values and Ethics of Community Organisation and Practice; Developing a Plan of work: Elements, Pre-requisites and guidelines.
Unit: III
Methods of Community Organization: Group Decision Making; Communication and Public Opinion; Protests and Demonstrations; Public Interest litigation; Public Relations; Dealing with Authorities; Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation.
Unit: IV
Community Organizer: Role as an Enabler, Guide, Expert and Therapist.
Skills and Attributes: Problem Solving and Analysis; Networking; Training; Organizing meetings, Writing Project Proposals, and documenting.
Integrating Principles and Practices – Case Studies.
Books Recommended:
1. Bhatnagar, O.P. & Dahama, O.P.: Education and Communication for Development (Oxford & IBH Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi: 1999)
2. Cox, F.M., et. al. (ed.): Strategies of Community Organisation: A Book of Readings (FE Peacock, Itasca, 12, 1987)
3. Freire, Paulo : Pedagogy of the Oppressed (Penguin Books , New Delhi,1992)
4. Gangrade K.D.: Community Organization in India (Popular Prakashan, Bombay, 1971)
5. Harper E.B. & Dunham A.: Community Organisation in Action (Association Press, New York, 1959)
6. Meenai, Zubair: Participatory Community Work (Concept Publications, New Delhi 2007)
7. Murphy, C. G.: Community Organisation Practice (Houghton Miffin Co., New York, 1954)
8. Murray R.G. & lappin B.W. : Community Organisation : Theory Principles and Practice (Harper & Row Publishers, New York, 1955)
11
9. Robbins, S.P. : Organizational Behaviour (Pearson Education, Inc., India 2003)
10. Siddiqui, H.Y.: Working with Communities: An Introduction to Community Work (Hira Publications, New Delhi, 1997)
11. Wayne M.M. : Community Organisation for Social Welfare (Chicago Press, Chicago,1951)
12. Weil, M (ed.): Community Practice: Conceptual Models (The Haworth Press, New York, 1996)
13. Ghurya, K.D.: Class, Caste and Occupation (Oxford University Press, Bombay: 1961)
13. Pathania, Sumita: Globalization, Culture and Gender: Some Issues, (Rawat Publications, Jaipur, 1999)
14. Herbert, J. Ruhim & Irene, S. Ruhim: Community Organizing and Development (Massachusetts: Allyn and Bacon Publications, 2001)
15. MSW’s Students Christ College, Bangalore, India (2007-2009)
16. File://G\Master’s in Social Work, Community Organization Notes.htm
12
SEMESTER – I
PAPER- III
COURSE TITLE
INDIAN SOCIAL STRUCTURE
Max. Marks: 100
Theory: 80 Marks
Int. Ass.: 20 Marks
Total Credit Points : 4
Time: 3 Hours
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks with nine questions in all. The candidates shall be required to attempt five questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 short answer type question, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt 4 long answer type questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60marks)
Course Objectives:
i. This course tends to familiarize students in understanding the concept of society and its various stages of transformation in India during the ancient, medieval and British period.
ii. Overview of changing socio-economic and cultural patterns.
iii. Caste system in Indian society at different stages.
iv. Changing Indian Rural Social Structure in the light of Globalization.
Unit: I
Understanding the concept of Social Structure-its various Dimensions; Understanding society: Concept, functions and characteristics; Evolution of Indian Society: Socio-Cultural Dimensions; Understanding caste system in India - political and social implications; Social Stratification- concept, sources, theories, types and functions.
13
Unit: II
Changes in Social Structure and Modernization: macro-social structure and social changes; Industrial and Urban Macro-structures; Micro-structural changes; changing family structure; Media and changing Indian Rural Social Structure; Factors affecting social change: Technological, Biological, and cultural.
Unit: III
Green Revolution-concept, evolution, philosophy and its impact; World Trade Organization and its impact on Indian farmers; Debt and its impact on farmers; Poverty and unemployment; Impact of Globalization on Indian economy; Impact of Agriculture on Indian economy; Land reforms in India.
Unit: IV
Social infrastructure and social sector: concept of social sector and social infrastructure; development of education in India, health, family welfare and development of health infrastructure, quality of population, population growth as a factor of economic development.
Books Recommended:
1. Beteille, Andre: Caste, Class and Power (Oxford University Press, Bombay, 1965)
2. Basava Raja, M.G.: World Trade Organization: Regional Trading Arrangements and India, (Serials Publications, New Delhi, 2000)
3. Chandra, Bipin: Modern India (NCERT, New Delhi 1976)
4. Desai, A.R.: Social Background of Indian Nationalism, (Popular Prakashan, Mumbai, 1996)
5. Dutta, Rudra: Indian Economy (Kogan, New Delhi 1996)
6. Dorin Bruno & Jullien Thomas (eds.): Agricultural Incentives in India: Past Trends and Prospective Paths towards Sustainable Development. (Manohar Publishers, New Delhi, 2005)
7. Fox, Robin: Kinship and marriage, Baltimore (Penguin Books, 1967)
8. Jain Rashmi (ed:): Communicating Rural Development (Rawat Publishers, New Delhi 2003)
9. Kataria, Pooja: CONFLICT RESOLUTION: Conflict – its causes, forms and methods of Resolution (Deep & Deep, New Delhi 2007)
10. Khor Martin et.al. (eds.): Views from the South: The Effects of Globalization and the WTO on Third World Countries. (The International Forum on Globalization, San Francisco, 2000)
11. Ketkar, S.V.: History of Caste in India (Popular Books, Bombay, 1979)
14
12. Maciver, R.M. & Charles, H. Page: Society: an Introductory Analysis, (Macmillan, New Delhi, 2000)
13. Panikkar, K.M.: Essential features of Indian Culture (Bhartiya Vidya Bhawan, Bombay, 1967)
14. Sharma, K.L., Indian Social Structure and Change (Rawat Publications, New Delhi, 2007)
15. Singh, Yogendra: Modernization of Indian Tradition, (Rawat publications, New Delhi, 2007)
16. Tandon, B.B.: Indian Economy (S. Chand & Co., New Delhi, 1987)
17. Rege, Sharmila: Sociology of Gender (Sage, New Delhi 2003)
15
SEMESTER – I
PAPER- IV
COURSE TITLE
EMPOWERMENT OF COMMUNITY: DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES
Max. Marks: 100
Theory: 80 Marks
Int. Ass.: 20 Marks
Total credit Points: 4
Time: 3 Hours
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks with nine questions in all. The candidates shall be required to attempt five questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 short answer type question, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt 4 long answer type questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60marks)
Course Objectives:
i. To acquaint the students about Community empowerment, concepts and different approaches.
ii. To apprise the students about different International agencies and their role in Empowerment of Communities.
iii. To give the students an insight into the objectives of communication skills.
iv. To provide an understanding on different models of community empowerment given by national leaders.
16
Course Content:
Unit I:
Community Development Programmes for Empowerment: Community Empowerment; Concept, Need, Scope, Strategies of Women Empowerment, issues and challenges.
Unit: II
United Nations: Agencies & Agenda; Approaches of Community Empowerment in Indian Context; Main objectives of Xth and XIth five year plans for Community Development.
Unit: III
Communication Skills: Definition, Meaning, Functions, Problems in Communication; Role and Task of the Communication Planner; Essential tools of Communication.
Unit: IV
Gandhian Model and Community Empowerment – Philosophy, Principles and Approaches, Concept of Decentralization, Swedashi Movement.
Ambedkar Model for Community Empowerment – Alternative Economic Development Model. Social and Economic Development, Discrimination of Caste.
J.P.Narayan, Model for Community Development Total Revolution, Sarvodaya, Lok Satta Movement.
Books Recommended:
1. Aggarwal, Sudarshan (ed): Dr. B.R.Ambedkar: The man and his Message (Prentice-Hal of India, New Delhi, 1991)
2. Bains, Ravindra Singh: Reservation Policy and Anti-Reservationists (B.R. Publishing Corporatin, New Delhi, 1994)
3. Bal, G.S.(Ed.): Understanding Ambedkar, (Ajanta Books International, Delhi, 2000)
4. Bharill, Chandra: Social and Political Ideas of B.R. Ambedkar (Aalekh Publishers, Jaipur, 1997)
5. Christensen, Karen and Levinson, David from the village to the Virtual World. Encyclopedia of Community Vol.-I (Sage Publication, 2002).
6. Chakravarty, Sukhamoy: Development Planning the Indian Experience (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1987)
7. Dahama. O.P. and Bhatnagar O.P.: Education and Communication for Development (Oxford and IBH publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi and Calcutta 1985)
8. Gandhi,M.K.: Satyagrah in South Africa, (Navjivan, Ahmedabad, 1992)
17
9. Gandhi, M.K: Hind Swaraj, (Navjivan, Ahmedabad, 1999)
10. Gandhi, M.K: Women and Social Justice, (Navjivan, Ahmedabad, 1958)
11. Gangrade, K.D.: Working with the Community at the Grassroots level: strategies and programs (Radha Publication, New Delhi, 2001)
12. Gangrade, K.D.: Gandhian approach to Development and Social work (Gandhi Smriti, New Delhi, 2005)
13. Joseph, John, Puthen Kalam : Empowerment, sustainable Human Development strategy for Poverty Alleviation (Rawat Publications, Jai, New Delhi 2003)
14. Khare, S. Vijay: Dr. B.R. Ambedkar and India’s National Security (Kilaso Books, 2005)
15. Singh, Binod Ram: Gandhian approach to development planning (Concept, New Delhi, 2006)
16. Sarkar, Sumit: Modern India, 1885-1947 – (Macmillan, Delhi, 1983)
18
SEMESTER – II
PAPER- I
COURSE TITLE
COMMUNITY SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
Max. Marks: 100
Theory: 80 Marks
Int. Ass.: 20 Marks
Total credit points: 4
Time: 3 Hours
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks & shall comprise of nine questions. The candidates shall be required to attempt five questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 short answer type question, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt 4 long answer type questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60marks)
Course Objectives:
i. To acquaint the students with concepts of community social psychology with respect to their behavior in the society.
ii. To enable them to understand group behavoiur and influence of the group on the individual in different situations.
iii. To make them understand about attitude formation and factors influencing attitude change, causes of prejudice, conflict and frustration.
iv. To acquaint them with knowledge about concepts of pro-social behavior, leadership and mental hygiene.
19
Course Content:
Unit : I
Social Psychology- meaning, nature and related disciplines of Social Psychology; Community Psychology: Meaning, Principles, Role and Skills; Psychological Sense of Community: Meaning, Elements.
Unit : II
Group Dynamics: Meaning; Group: Meaning, Types, Group structure, Characteristics of Group formation; Influence of Group on performance of task: Social facilitation, Social Loafing, De-individualization, Group Polarization; Group Interaction: Cooperation & Competition; Social Influence: Conformity, Compliance and Obedience.
Unit : III
Attitudes: Meaning, Means of Attitude Formation, Attitude functions, Factors Influence Attitude Change; Prejudices: Meaning, Sources (Social, Emotional, Cognitive); Conflict: Meaning, Types, Sources (causes), Escapes from Conflict; Frustration: Meaning, Sources; Defense Mechanism – Meaning, Types.
Unit: IV
Altruism & Pro-social behavior: Meaning, Steps Determine Helping versus not helping, External &Internal Influences on helping behavior , Theoretical Perspectives on Helping; Leadership: Meaning, types, qualities, function and styles of leadership; Mental Hygiene – Meaning, Elements, causes of hazards of mental health, measures of preservation of mental health.
Books Recommended:
1. Devid G.Myers: Social Psychology (McGraw Hill, Inc, New Delhi,1993)
2. Kuppuswamy, B: Media Promoters and Publishers Pvt. Ltd. 1990.
3. Lewis-Peterson: Human Behaviour, an Introduction to Psychology (McGraw Hill, New York, 1974).
4. Morgan and King: Introduction to Psychology, (Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1975).
5. Munn, N.L.: Introduction to Psychology (Houghton Mifflin, Boston, 1969).
6. Robert A. Baron, Donn Byrne: Social Psychology (Dorling Kindersley (India), Pvt. Ltd, Patparganj, New Delhi, 2009)
7. Shelley E. Taylor, Letitia Anne Peplau, David O. Sears: Social Psychology (Dorling Kindersley (India), Pvt. Ltd, Patparganj, New Delhi, 2006)
20
SEMESTER – II
PAPER- II
COURSE TITLE
HUMAN RIGHTS AND DUTIES
Max. Marks: 100
Theory: 80 Marks
Int. Ass.: 20 Marks
Total Credit Points: 4
Time: 3 Hours
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks & with nine questions in all. The candidates shall be required to attempt five questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 short answer type question, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt 4 long answer type questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60marks)
Course Objectives:
i. To enable the students to acquaint themselves about the basic issues involved in human rights.
ii. Apprise themselves about the historical basis of the Human Rights Concept.
iii. Gain knowledge about the various instruments of human rights
iv. Make themselves aware about the constitutional provisions with regard to fundamental rights and duties.
v. Sensitize the students about the general human rights problems and their violations.
vi. Empower themselves about the Role of NGO’s and National Human Rights Commission Protection, Promotion and Enforcement of Human Rights.
21
Course Content:
Unit: I Understanding Concept of Rights and Duties:
Nature of Rights (Absolute/Reasonable/Universal); Relationship with concepts of Liberty, Equality, Fraternity and Justice; Classification of Rights (moral, social, cultural economic civil and political); Classification of Duties (Towards Self, Family, Community, Society, Nation/State, and Human Beings).
Unit : II Human Rights Foundations:
Historical Evolution of Human Rights (At International and National Level); Categories of Human Rights: Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and Constitution of India; International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) and Constitution of India; International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights(ICESCR) and Constitution of India.
Unit-III Human Rights for Communities:
Women Rights: Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and Constitution of India; Child Rights: Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and Constitution of India; Scheduled Castes and Constitution of India; Tribals and Constitution of India; Minorities and Constitution of India.
Unit-IV Human Rights for Special Groups and their Violations:
Human Rights and Special Groups: Prisoners, AIDS Patient, Refugees, War Victims, Sex Workers, Disabled Persons, Workers; Human Rights Violations: Case Studies; A Case Study of Sexual Harassment; A Case Study of Tribes under the Colonial Rule; Human Rights Violations and the Role of Media; Role of NGO’s and NHRC in the Protection, Promotion and Enforcement of Human Rights.
Books Recommended:
1. Amnesty International: Human Rights Education (Amnesty International London, 1992)
2. Gross B. & Gross R.: The Children’s Rights Movement: Overcoming the Oppression of Young People (Anchor Press/ Doubleday, New York, 1977)
3. Jaswal P.S. & Jaswal N. : Human Rights and The Law (APH Publishing Corporation, New Delhi, 1996)
4. Malhotra, S., et. al.: Human Rights: Emerging Issues (Kilaso Books, New Delhi, 2005)
5. Rai, R. : Human Rights : UN Initiatives (Author’s Press, New Delhi, 2000)
6. Reichert, E.: Social Work and Human Rights (Rawat Publications, Jaipur, 2003)
22
SEMESTER – II
PAPER- III
COURSE TITLE
PANCHAYATI RAJ SYSTEM IN INDIA
Max. Marks: 100
Theory: 80 Marks
Int. Ass.: 20 Marks
Total Credit Points: 4
Time: 3 Hours
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks with nine questions in all. The candidates shall be required to attempt five questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 short answer type question, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt 4 long answer type questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60marks)
Course Objectives:
i. To enable the students to understand the factors responsible in the evolution of Panchayati Raj System in India.
ii. To give the students knowledge about different provisions under Constitutional Amendments with regard to empowering the local self Governments.
iii. To acquaint the students with the system of decentralized local governance.
iv. To apprise the students about the involvement of women in Empowering Community.
23
Course Content:
Unit: I
Evolution of Panchayati Raj institutions in India; Planning for Panchayati Raj Institution, 73rd & 74th Constitutional Amendment Act; Role of State Control over Local Government.
Unit: II
Panchayati Raj Institutions- Zila Parishad, Panchayat Samiti, Gram Panchayat, Gram Sabha, Khap Panchayat Structure, Composition and functions; Role of Panchayat Officer, Block Development Officer and Panchayat Secretary.
Unit: III
Community mobilization; Community participation for effectiveness in a democratic system; Role of Community Leadership in Panchayati Raj Institutions.
Unit: IV
Women Reservation Bill; Women in Panchayati Raj Instititution; NGOs and Panchayati Raj Institution: Genesis - Meaning and Partnership.
Books Recommended:
1. Bhargva, B.S.: Grassroot Leadership, A study of Leadership in Panchayati Raj Institutions (Ashis, Delhi, 1979)
2. Bam B.H. and Sarkar L.: New Perspectives for third world women (The E.V. Mathew memorial lecture, 1976).
3. Bandopadhyay, D and Mukherjee, Amitava, Eds.: New issues in Panchayati Raj Concept, New Delhi, 2004)
4. Choudhury, R C and Rajakutty, S: Indian Rural Development Report (NIRD, Hyderabad, 1999)
5. Choudhury, R C and Rajakutty, S: Fifty years Rural Development in India: Retrospect and prospect (NIRD, Hyderabad, 1998)
6. Chaturvedi,T.N : Panchayati Raj (IIPA, Delhi, 1981)
7. Singh, Katar: Rural development: Principles, policies and management Ed (Sage, New Delhi, 1999)
8. Mishra, S.N.: New Panchayati Raj in action, (Mittal, Delhi 1996)
9. Maddick, Henry : Panchayati Raj, Local Government in India (Longman, London, 1970)
10. Reddy, Gram (ed.): Pattern of Panchayati Raj in India (Macmillan, Delhi, 1977)
24
11. Singh,Raj : New Panchayati Raj, (Anmol, Delhi 2000)
12. Singh, S.S. & Mehta, Suresh: Legislative Framework of Panchayati Raj in India, (International, Delhi, 1993)
13. Goel, S.L., Shalini Rajnesh: Panchayati Raj in India (Deep and Deep Publication, 2003)
14. Ram, Sundar D.: Panchayati Raj and Empowering people (Kanishka , New Delhi, 2007)
15. Ram, Sundar D.: Panchayati Raj Reforms in India (Kanishka New Delhi, 2007)
16. Ram, Sundar D.: Role of Panchayati Raj Institution in 60 years of Independent India (Kanishka New Delhi, 2008)
25
SEMESTER – II
PAPER- IV
COURSE TITLE
HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING
Max. Marks: 100
Theory: 80 Marks
Int. Ass.: 20 Marks
Total credit Points: 4
Time: 3 Hours
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks with nine questions in all. The candidates shall be required to attempt five questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 short answer type question, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt 4 long answer type questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60marks)
Course Objectives:
i. To make the student understand the significance of human resource development.
ii. To apprise the students about various interventionist strategies in Human Resource Development.
iii. To acquaint them with process, strategies, methods, organization and evaluation of training programmes.
iv. To make them familiar with issues and factors which strengthen the training programme.
Course Content:
Unit: I
Basics of Human Resource Development; Human Resource Development (HRD) – Concept, Characteristics, Dimension, Needs and Priorities; Rational and Assumptions concerning HRD, New technology, the knowledge process and Human Resource Development; Measuring Human Resource Development.
26
Unit: II
Strategic Interventions in HRD Sectors : In health, basic education, adult education, technical and vocational education, higher education, science and technology, environment, empowerment of women, entrepreneurial skills; Strategic processes for HRD usability in NGO’s- decentralization, enhancing participation, mobilizing resources enhancing co-ordination, professionalizing Government.
Unit: III
Basics of Training and Training Process: Training and development – meaning, concept, importance and Principles; Training process; different phases of training; Types of training; Models of training & approaches.
Unit: IV
Training design: Training Need Analysis (TNA) – Concept, Importance and Methods; Training strategy and Designing training session – Experiential Learning Cycle (ELC); Training methods – their importance, uses and limitations; Techniques of organizing training effectively (institutional as well as field training for different categories of clientele); Monitoring and Evaluation of training programme; Factors affecting training.
Books Recommended:
1. Arya, P.P., Tandon B.B.: Human Resource Development (Deep & Deep, New Delhi, 1995)
2. Bhatia, S.K.: Emerging Human Resource Development (Deep & Deep, New Delhi, 2008)
3. Chaudhary, D.P.: Training Methodology and Management (Sterling Pub., Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 1986).
4. Dahama, O.P. and Bhatnagar, O.P.: Education and Communication for Development, 2nd Ed. (Oxford and IBH Publishing Co., New Delhi, 1985).
5. Gupta, Rajen: Implementing Human Resource Development, 1st Ed. (Rawat Publications, Jaipur, 1990)
6. Gupta, Santosh, Gupta Sachin: Human Resource Development, Concepts and Practices (Deep & Deep, New Delhi, 2008).
7. Harison, Rosemary and Kessels Joseph: Human Resource Development in knowledge Economy (Macmillan, China, 2004).
8. Hansa, B.S. and Kumar B.: Training Methodology for Human Resource (Sage, New Delhi, 1998)
9. Hargreaves, Peter, Jarvis Peter: The Human Resource Development Handbook (Stylus, U.S.A. 2000)
10. Lynton, and Pareek, U.: Training for Development, 2nd Ed. (Vistar Publications, New Delhi, 1978)
27
11. Mamoria, C.B. Personnel Management, 9th Ed. (Himalaya Publishing House, Bombay, 1991).
12. Mishra D.C.: New Directions in Extension Training, A conceptual Frame work (Directorate of Extension, Ministry of Agriculture, New Delhi, 1990).
13. John, Prior: Handbook of Training and Development (Tayco Publishing House, Delhi, 1994).
14. Robinson, Kenneth R.: A Handbook of Training Management (Aditya Book Private Ltd., New Delhi, 1988).
15. Pareek, U. and Rao T.V.: Designing and Managing Human Resources Systems (Oxford and IBH Publishing Co., New Delhi, 1992).
16. Rao, T.V.: Human Resource Development, Experiences, interventions and strategies (Sage Publishing, New Delhi, 1996).
17. Silvera, D.M.: Human Resource Development, the Indian Experience (New India Pub. Co., New Delhi, 1988).
18. Singh, Jayant: Principles of Personnel Management, 1st Ed. (Radha Publications, New Delhi, 1996).
19. Stewart, J. and McGoldrick (ed): Human Resource Development: Perspectives, Strategies and practice (Financial Times, Pitman Publishing, London, 1996)
20. Singh, P.N.: Training for Management Development (ISTD, New Delhi, 1989).
21. Verma, M.M: Human Resource Development (Gitangali Publishing House, New Delhi, 1988).
22. Werther, Keith Davis: Personnel Management and Human Resources, 2nd Ed. (McGraw Hill Book Company, New York, 1985).
23. Wilson, John P: Human Resource Development (Sterling, London, 2005)
28
SEMESTER III
PAPER- I
COURSE TITLE
CONFLICT RESOLUTION
Max. Marks: 100
Theory:80 Marks
Int. Ass.: 20 Marks
Total Credit Points: 4
Time: 3 Hours
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks with nine questions in all. The candidates shall be required to attempt five questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 short answer type question, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt 4 long answer type questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60marks)
Course Objectives:
i. To give the basic understanding to the students about the concept of conflict and its various dimensions.
ii. To apprise the students about different conflict resolution techniques and their application in various conflict situations.
iii. To make the students aware about the emerging conflict in the Indian society.
iv. To acquaint the students about the role of different agencies which work for conflict resolution.
Course Content:
Unit: I
Conflict: Meaning, Definition, Nature and Concepts; Causes and Types of Conflict: Interpersonal to International.
29
Unit: II
Conflict resolution and transformation, General strategies and tactics; Usual Pacific methods of Conflict Resolution; Negotiation, Mediation, Arbitration, and Adjudication; Gandhian Techniques of Non-Violent Action. Satyagrah: Meaning, Scope and forms.
Unit: III
Major Conflicts in Indian Society: Communal, Caste and Gender Conflicts; Naxalism, Punjab Imbroglio, Terrorism and conflict resolution- Regional and Global repercussions.
Unit: IV
Agencies of Conflict Resolution: Peace keeping and Peace building; Genesis and Development; Media and conflict Resolution; Vinoba Bhave’s Model of Conflict Resolution- Shanti Sena: Significance and role in conflict resolution John Burton’s Problem solving approach.
Books Recommended:
1. Burton, John: Conflict Resolution and Preventive Human Needs Theory (St. Martin Press, New York, 1990)
2. Burton, J.W.: Global conflict (Wheatsheef, London, 1984).
3. Gutting, John: Institutionalized conflict resolution-A theoretical paradigm, (Journal of Peace Research, 1965)
4. Juergensmeyer, Mark: A handbook of Conflict resolution (Oxford, New Delhi 2003).
5. Khanna, D.D. & Kuek Gert W): Conflict Resolution, Human Rights and Democracy (Shipra, New Delhi, 2003)
6. Kriesberg, Louis: Social Conflicts (Englewood, Parentice Hall, 1982).
7. Kulkarni, V.B.: Conflict in Indian Society (Bhartya Vidya Bhavan, Bombay, 1987)
8. Konton, D.E.: The Mediation-Intervention discussions towards an integrated perspective (Negotiation Journal, Vol. IV, NO.2, 1988, pp 143-148)
9. Secretary, Sarva Sena Sangh: Principles and Aims of Shanti Sena (Bhargava Bhushan Press, Varanasi, 1969)
10. Shridharan, K.L.: War Without Violence (Bhartiya Vidya Bhavan, Bombay, 1962).
11. Thakur, Ramesh: International conflict resolution (Westview, London, 1998).
12. Wallenstern: Peace research- Part III (Wesby Press, London, 1998)
30
SEMESTER III
PAPER- II
COURSE TITLE
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Max. Marks: 100
Theory: 80 Marks
Int. Ass.: 20 Marks
Total credit Points: 4
Time: 3 Hours
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks with nine questions in all. The candidates shall be required to attempt five questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 short answer type question, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt 4 long answer type questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60marks)
Course Objectives:
i. To acquaint the students with methodology of conducting extension research.
ii. To help them to understand the construction of tools used for collecting data.
iii. To make them understand the use of various statistical techniques for the purpose of analyzing the data.
iv. To develop an insight on how to conduct research in the field.
31
Course Contents:
Unit: I
Research- Meaning, Characteristics, Classification of Research; Social Research: Importance and limitation of Social Research; Research problem: Meaning, Criteria of selection of good Research Problem, Sources of Research Problem, Necessary conditions for formulation of Research Problem; Procedure of Research Proposal.
Unit: II
Research Methods: Historical, Descriptive, Experimental (Nature, value, types, steps); Sampling : Definition, Characteristics, Advantages; Types of sampling (nature, merits, demerits); Size of sampling; Scales of Measurement – Nominal, Ordinal, Interval and Ratio Scales.
Unit: III
Sources of data collection –Primary, Secondary, Choice between primary to secondary data; Technique of Date Collection – Observation, Interview and Questionnaire, Case study; Hypothesis – Definition, Features and Types; Process of Report writing.
Unit: IV
Frequency distribution, Graphic presentation of the Frequency Distribution; Measures of Central Tendency -Mean, Median and Mode, Standard Deviation; Normal Probability Curve: Properties & Application; Correlation: Linear and Rank Correlation.
Books Recommended:
1. Bogdan, R. & Taylor, S.J.: Introduction of Qualitative Research Methods (John Willy & Sons, New York, 1975)
2. Guilford, J.P. & Frutcher Bengamin: Fundamental Statistics in Psychology and Education (Mc Graw Hill, New York, 1978)
3. John W. Best & James V. Kahh : Research in Education (Prentice Hall of India 2001).
4. Kerlinger, F.N.: Foundations of Behavioural Sciences (Surjeet Publications, Delhi 1996).
5. Kothari, CR: Research Methodology: Methods and techniques (Wishwa Prakashan, New Delhi, 1996)
6. Kaul, Lokesh: Methodology of Educational Research (Vikas Publisher House Pvt. Ltd., 2009)
7. Mohsin, S.M.: Research Methods in Behavioural Sciences (Orient Longman Ltd., Calcutta 1984).
32
8. Nachmias, David & Nachmias, Chava: Research Methods in the Social Sciences (St. Martin’s Press, New York, 1981).
9. Siegel, S. & Castellan, Jr. John, N.: Non-Parametric Methods for Behavioural Sciences (Mc Graw Hill, New York, 1988).
10. Singh, K.: Research Methodology (Prakash Kendra, Lukhnow, 2001)
11. Sukhia, P.V. Mehrotra and Mehrotra: Elements of Educational Research (Allied Publishers Private Limited, 1983).
33
SEMESTER III
PAPER- III
COURSE TITLE
COMMUNITY COUNSELLING
Max. Marks 100 Theory: 80 Marks
Int. Ass.: 20 Marks
Total Credit Points: 4
Time: 3 Hours
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks with nine questions in all. The candidates shall be required to attempt five questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 short answer type question, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt 4 long answer type questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60marks)
Course Objectives:
i. To make the students understand the concepts of Guidance and Counselling and draw differences between them.
ii. To acquaint the students about the historical basis for the beginning of counselling in this world.
iii. To get familiar with the concept of Community Counselling.
iv. To explore the process of counseling.
v. To know about the counselling skills needed for becoming an effective counselor.
vi. To apprise the students about the various types of counselling needed for a special types of population.
vii. To equip the students with the techniques of assessing the counselee’s.
viii. Orientation on how to develop and Manage Counselling programs.
ix. To understand the ethical and legal considerations in Counselling.
34
Course Contents:
Unit-I
Concepts of Guidance and Counselling and their Differences; Counselling: Meaning, Objectives; Need and Scope, Evolution of Counselling; Community Counselling as a helping profession; Multicultural Counselling.
Unit-II
Counselling Process; Counselling Skills: Verbal and Non-Verbal; An Effective Counsellor: As a professional counsellor, Culturally Skilled Counsellor, Counsellor in Community and Agency Setting, An Educational Counsultant, As Consultant to Community and Business Organisations.
Unit-III
Types of Community Counselling: Employment Counselling, Correctional Counselling, Rehabilitation Counselling,Pre-Marital and Marriage Counselling, Family Counselling, Pastoral Counselling, Gerontology Counselling, Career Counselling, Educational Counselling.
Counselling for Special Populations: Substance Abusers, Women, Aged, Business and Industry, AIDS patients, Abuse Victims, Gays and Lesbians, People with Disabilities, The Poor
Unit-IV
Assesment of Counselling: Testing Techniques:Intelligence Tests, Aptitude Tests, Interest Inventories, Personality Tests; Non-Testing Techniques: Questionnaire, Observation, Anectodal Records, Sociometric Techniques, Counselling Interview; Counselling Program Development and Management: Developing , Evaluating and Program Management; Ethical and Legal Concerns of Counselling
Books Recommended:
1. Bengalee, M.D.: Guidance and Counselling (Seth and Seth Publications, Bombay, India, 1984)
2. Gibson, R.L. & Mitchell, M.H.: Introduction to Counseling and Guidance (Pearson Education, Inc, New Delhi, India, 2008)
3. Gladding, S.T.: Counselling: A Comprehensive Profession, Upper Saddle River (Pearson Education, Inc, New Jersy, U.S.A., 2007)
4. Jones, R.N.: Introduction to Counselling Skills: Texts and Activities (Sage Publications, New Delhi, India, 2000)
5. Lewis, J.A. & Lewis, M.D: Community Counselling: A Human Services Approach (John Wiley & Sons, New York, U.S.A.,1977)
6. Meier, S.T., & Davis, S.R.: The Elements of Counselling’ (Third Edition), (Pacific Grove: C.A.: Brooks/Cole, 1997)
35
7. Mac Cluskie, K.C., & Ingersoll, R.E: Becoming a 21st Century Agency Counselor (Belmont, C.A.: Wadsworth. 2001)
8. Rao, Narayana S.: Counselling and Guidance (Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Ltd., New Delhi, India, 2002)
9. Shertzer, B. & Stone, S.C.: Fundamentals of Guidance (Houghton, Boston, 1981)
10. Suri, S.P. & Sodhi, T.S.: Guidance and Counselling (Bawa Publications, Patiala, India, 2000)
36
SEMESTER III
PAPER-IV
Course Title
EDUCATION AND LIFE LONG LEARNING
Max. Marks 100 Theory: 80 Marks
Int. Ass.: 20 Marks
Total Credit Points: 4
Time: 3 Hours
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks with nine questions in all. The candidates shall be required to attempt five questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 short answer type question, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt 4 long answer type questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60marks)
Course Objectives:
i. To apprise the students about the various facets of Education and Life Long Learning.
ii. To acquaint the students about the various life skills and its adaptability.
iii. To apprise the students about various extension services for Community Development.
iv. To understand the need and importance of Adult Literacy for National Development.
37
Course Content:
Unit : I
Life Long Learning: Meaning, Concept, Approaches; Life Skills: Concept, Meaning, Scope and Nature; Occupational Education and Training.
Unit : II
Education for all: Concept, Meaning, Nature and Scope; Constitutional 86th Amendment Act; Education Policy (1986 and 1992) Role of Education under Globalization, Liberalization and Privatization.
Unit :III
Extension Education for Community Development; Quality of Life Improvement Programmes in India, Needs and Problems of Motivating Adults; Role of Media and Telecommunications in Community Education.
Unit :IV
Saakshar Bharat Mission 2012: Goals, Objectives, Flexi Approaches to Literacy, Implementation Strategy, Teaching-Learning & Skill Development Programmes of Saakshar Bharat Mission.
Books Recommended:
1. Dahama, O.P. and Bhatnagar O.P.: Education and Communication for Development, 2nd Ed. (Oxford & IBH Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi 1987)
2. Gwyn, E. Jones: Investing in Rural Extension, Strategies and Goals (Elsevier Applied Science Publishers, New York 1963)
3. Halbraith, Michael W.: Adult Learning Methods (Krieger Publishing Company, Florida, 1990)
4. Kelsey, L.D. and Hearne C.C.: Co-operative Extension Work, 3rd Ed. (Comstock Publishing Associates, New York, 1963)
5. National Document on Saakshar Bharat Mission 2012, GOI, NLM (2009)
6. Reddy, A.A.: Extension Education (Sree Laxmi Press, Guntur, 1987)
7. Sanders, H.C.: The co-operative Extension (Prentice Hall Inc., New Jersey, 1966)
8. Savile, A.H.: Extension in Rural Communities (Oxford University Press, New York, 1965)
38
9. Singh, Ranjit: Text Book of Extension Education (Sahitya Kala Prakashan, Ludhiana, 1987)
10. Supe, S.V.: An Introduction to Extension Education (Oxford and IBH Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 1988)
11. Waghmare, S.K.: Teaching Extension Education, 2nd Ed. (Metropolitan Book Co. Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 1989)
39
SEMESTER-IV
PAPER- I
COURSE TITE
RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND ENTRERPRENEURSHIP
Max. Marks: 100
Theory: 80 Marks
Int. Ass.: 20 Marks
Total Credit Points: 4
Time: 3 Hours
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks with nine questions in all. The candidates shall be required to attempt five questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 short answer type question, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt 4 long answer type questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60marks)
Course Objectives:
i. To acquaint the students about the basic concepts of Development, Rural Development, models of development, Entrepreneurship Development and socio-economic structure of the rural society since independence.
ii. To make the students aware about financial institutions that are engaged in the development of rural areas.
iii. To make them aware of the various policies and programs of the Indian Government for the rural development particularly of the marginalized section of the rural areas and bureaucratic hastles in the proper development of rural India.
iv. To enable the students to critically examine the role of the public and private sector institutions for Rural Development in India.
40
Course contents:
Unit: I
Rural Development: Concept and Strategies; Changing profile of Indian Rural society since Independence; Measures and determinants of rural development.
Unit: II
Rural Development Administration in India- Structure, Role of Panchayati Raj in Rural Development, Credit and Banking, Rural Credit and Self Help Groups, Rural Extension Services, Rural Development through use of Information and Communication Technology; Policies and programs for rural development in India since independence :A critique; Bureaucracy and Rural Development-issues and challenges; Rural Problems and Challenges.
Unit: III
Entrepreneurship Development- concept, approach, need, scope and prospects; Development of Entrepreneurial Characteristics- need, system and motivational pattern, achievement planning, goal setting; Entrepreneurship Development Programs in India.
Unit: IV
Need of business planning at the rural level for development; Financing by Public and private sector banks for weaker section in rural areas particularly in areas of agriculture and allied activities; Initiating Indigenous rural entrepreneurship; Marketing Management-pricing, sale, Octroi, sales appraisal, advertising and sale promotion, import/ export.
Books Recommended:
1. Arora, Ramesh K. & Hooja Rakesh: Administration for Rural Development- Indian and Comparative perspective (Arihant Publishing House, 1996)
2. Arora, Rana & Sood, S.K.: Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship and Small Business (Kalyani, New Delhi, 2005)
3. Arya, K.S.et.al.: Rural Development in India: Some facets (Naharsons, Chandigarh, 1986)
4. Bogaert, M.V.D. and AKN: Group Entrepreneurship with Rural Poor (Indian Social Institute, New Delhi, 1989)
5. Burns, Danny, et. al.: The Politics of Decentralization, Revitalizing Local Democracy (Macmillan, London, 1994)
6. Cheema, G & Ponoineli D. (ed): Decentralization and Development Policy Implementation in developing Countries (Sage, London, 1993)
41
7. Chaudhary, R.C. & Rajakutty, S: Fifty Years of Rural development in India, Retrospect and Prospects (NIRD, 1998)
8. Dak, T.M.: Social Inequalities and Rural Development, (National Publishing House, New Delhi, 1982)
9. Danda, K. Ajit (ed): Studies for Rural Development (Inter alia publications, New Delhi, 1984)
10. Desai, A.R.: Changing Profile of Rural India and Human Rights of Agrarian poor (CRRID Publications, Chandigarh, 1990)
11. Donald, L.: The Art & Science of extension (Cambridge Gallinger publishing house, 1986)
12. Dubhashi, P.R.: Rural Development Administration in India (Popular Prakashan, Bombay, 1970)
13. Gehlawat, J.K., Kant, K.: Strategies for Rural Development (Arnold Publishers, 1987)
14. Karmakar: Rural Credit and Self Help Groups-Micro Finance needs and concepts in India (Sage, New Delhi, 1999)
15. Kothari, C.R. ed: Rural Development- Strategy for Rural Development (Manak Publication, New Delhi, 1991)
16. Mishra, S.N. & Sharma: Problems & Prospects of Rural Development in India (Uppal Publishing House, New Delhi, 1983)
17. Mishra, S.N.: Panchayati Raj Bureaucracy and Rural Development (Indian Institute of Public Administration, New Delhi, 1986)
18. Mishra, Rajeeb: Voluntary Sector and Rural Development (Rawat, New Delhi, 2008)
19. Oakley, Peter, et. al.: Approaches to Participation in Rural Development (I.C.O. Geneva, 1984)
20. Rathore, R.S., Dhaneja: Entrepreneurship in the 21st Century (Rawat, New Delhi 2009)
21. Gangadhara: Development (Kanishka Publishing House, New Delhi 1992)
22. Saini, J.S.: Entrepreneurial development programs Practices (Deep & Deep, New Delhi, 1997)
23. Singh, Nagendra: Role of Financial institutions in Rural Entrepreneurship and Development, (Development Banking Centre, New Delhi, 1982)
24. Sisodia, Yatindra Singh: Rural Development –Macro-Micro Realities (Rawat, New Delhi, 2007)
25. Singh, Katar: Rural Development: Principles, Policies and Management (Sage, New Delhi, 1996)
42
SEMESTER –IV
PAPER II
COURSE TITLE
URBANIZATION AND SLUMS
Max. Marks: 100
Theory: 80 Marks
Int. Ass.: 20 Marks
Total Credit points: 4
Time: 3 Hours
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks & shall comprise of nine questions. The candidates shall be required to attempt five questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 short answer type question, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt 4 long answer type questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60marks)
Course Objectives:
i. To acquaint the students with concepts of urbanization and its consequences.
ii. To enable them to understand about the evolution of slums and its constitutional provisions.
iii. To apprise the students about the role of government/NGO.
iv. To make them understand about poverty in general and urban poverty in particular.
Course content:
Unit: I
Urbanization: Meaning, Causes of Urbanization in India, Trends in Urbanization in India, Problems of Urbanization and its solutions; Urbanism: Meaning and Characteristics; City: Concept, Determinants, Merits and Demerits; evolutions of slums.
43
Unit: II
Slums: Meaning, Characteristics, Classification, Causes for the existences of slums; functions of the slums; goals and objectives of working with slums.
Unit: III
Slum Development: Role of Government, Role of various stake holders at local level; Schemes related to slum development; 74th Constitutional Amendment Legislative Provisions.
Unit: IV
Poverty: Definition, indicators; Urban poor: causes, effects of poverty, UN measures and remedies, Below Poverty line standards, poverty alleviation Programmes.
Books Recommended:
1. Bharagave, Gopal (ed.): Urban Problems and Policy Perspective (Abhinav Publications, New Delhi, 1981)
2. Flanagan, William, G. : Urban Sociology: Images and Structure (Boston, Allyn and Bacon, 1990)
3. Gill, Rajesh: Issues and Perspective on Urban Poverty, The Indian Experience: in Urban India, Vol. XVII, Jan.-June/July-Dec. Nos. 1&2.
4. Mills E.S. and Becker, C.M.: Studies in Indian Urban Development (Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 1986)
5. Rakodi, Carole and Lloyd John T. (eds): Urban Livelihoods: A People Centred Approach to Reducing Poverty (Earthscan Publication Ltd. London, 2002)
6. Report of National Commissin on Urbanization : Government of India, Vols. 1&2 (1988)
7. Rao, Shankar, C.N. : Sociology of Indian Society (S.Chand & Company Ltd. , New Delhi, 2000)
8. Sundaram, K.V. : Urban and Regional Planning in India (Vikas Publishing House, Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 1977)
44
SEMESTER – IV
PAPER- III
COURSE TITLE
POPULATION AND HEALTH EDUCATION
Max. Marks: 100
Theory: 80 Marks
Int. Ass.: 20 Marks
Total Credit points: 4
Time: 3 Hours
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks & shall comprise of nine questions. The candidates shall be required to attempt five questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 short answer type question, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt 4 long answer type questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60marks)
Course Objectives:
i. To acquaint the students with concepts of population Education.
ii. To enable them to understand population dynamics and impact of population growth.
iii. To make them understand the reproductive health care and family life education.
iv. To make them understand the importance of community health for the welfare of society.
v. To understand the Policies and programmes initiated by the government to assess the need for community health.
vi. The role of various agencies in the population education and health education
45
Course content:
Unit: I
Population Education: Concept, Objectives, Significance and Scope; Population Dynamics: Fertility, Mortality, Migration; measurement and consequences of population dynamics; National population policy: objectives, and features; Impact of Population growth: Economic Development, Natural Resources & Quality of life.
Unit: II
Reproductive Health: concept, scope of reproductive health care; sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and prevention if Human Immuno deficiency Virus (HIV), human Sexuality and gender relations, Adoloscence; Family Life Education: meaning, Objectives, Dimensions, contents, and significance, essential attributes, distinction of family life education from population Education ; Role of various Agencies in Population Education .
Unit: III
Health: Meaning, determinants, and responsibility for health care; Health care system in India; National Health Policy (latest): objectives and features; Organizational frame work for implementation of health policy: Center, State, District, Block, Primary Health Centers & WHO.
Unit: IV
Health Education: Meaning, Objectives, Principles, Functions. Content; Communication and Practices in health Education; National Health Education Programmes in India; Agencies of health Education: Opinion Leaders, mass media, personal contacts.
Books Recommended:
1. Aggarwal , J.C.: Population Education (New Delhi; Shipra Publications , 2002)
2. Georage, Pickett and John J. Hanlon: Public Health: Administration and Practice (published by William C. Brown, 1989)
3. Goel , S.L.: Public health Policy and Administration (1994)
4. Gupta J.P. & Sood ,O.P : Contemporary Public Health; Policy, Planning, Management (2005)
5. Howard, Guy et. al. (eds.): Healthy Villages -A Guide for Communities and Community Health Workers. (World Health organization, Geneva, 2002).
6. Kuttan, Mahadevan : Health Education for Quality of life (B.r. Publishing Corporation, Delhi )
46
7. Nardi, Deena Alleria; Petr, Josg M. (eds.): Community Health & Wellness Needs Assessment: A Step by Step Guide (Thomas Delmor Learning, Canada, 2003).
8. Rao, V.K.: Population Education (A.P.H. Publishing Corporation New Delhi, 2001)
9. Report of the Health Survey and planning Committee Vol. 1,1959-61
10. Sanjivi, K.S.: planning India‘s Health (Oriented Longman, 1971).
11. Sharma, R.C: Population Resources ,Environment and Quality of Life, Hand Book on Population Education, (New Delhi; Rai and Sons 1988)
12. Park,K.: Text Book of Preventive and Social Medicine (Prem Nagar, Nagpur Road Jabalpur India 1989)
13. U.K. Singh & K.N. Sudarshan: Population Education (Discovery Publishing House, New Delhi, 1996)
47
SEMESTER – IV
PAPER- IV
COURSE TITLE
ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT
Max. Marks: 100
Theory: 80 Marks
Int. Ass.: 20 Marks
Total Credit points: 4
Time: 3 Hours
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER-SETTER/EXAMINERS
a) Theory paper shall be of 80 marks & shall comprise of nine questions. The candidates shall be required to attempt five questions.
b) Question No. 1 shall be compulsory, consisting of 10 short answer type question, spread over the whole syllabus, to be answered in 20 to 25 words and carrying 2 marks each. (10x2=20marks)
c) In addition to Question No. 1, candidates are required to attempt 4 long answer type questions, by selecting one from each of the four units. Each unit shall have two questions of 15 marks each. (4x15=60marks)
Course Objectives:
i. To orient the students understand about the concept of environmental education and its importance in today’s times.
ii. To sensitize the students about the concept of environmental pollution and its various causes.
iii. To make the students understand the general concept of Disaster Management.
iv. To understand Disaster preparedness, rescue and relief for disaster.
48
Course content:
Unit: I
Environmental Education: Concept, Importance, Objectives and Scope; Principals of Environmental Education; Significance of Environmental Education for Sustainable Development; Approaches of Environmental Education.
Unit: II
Environmental Pollution: Concept; Types of Environmental Pollution: Radioactive, Solid Waste, Air and water; Causes of Pollution; Pollution control Technologies.
Unit: III
United Nations and Environment; Environment Protection Act 1986, Indian Laws relating to Control of Air, Water and Noise Pollution; Social Responsibility and Environment Ethics;
Unit: IV
Disaster: Meaning, Types, Causes of different Disasters and their effects; Disaster Management cycle: Disaster Management at community level: Individual, Society level, Rescue from Disaster: Principles of governing Rescue; Rescue process; Relief for disaster: Preparatory phase of relief, Planning immediate Relief, Execution of Relief.
Books Recommended:
1. Beeby, Alan, Annie Brennan: First Ecology: Ecological Principles and Environmental Issues (Oxford University Press, 3rd Edition, 2008)
2. Chandna, R.C.: Environmental Awareness (Kalyani Publications, New Delhi, 1998)
3. Dani, H.M.: Environmental Education (Panjab University, Chandigarh, Publication Bureau, 1996)
4. Golley, F.B.: A Primer for Environmental Literacy (Universities Press, India Ltd., Hydrabad, 1998)
5. Kaur, A. et al.: Scientific approach to Environmental Education (Tandon Publications, Ludhiana, 2003).
6. Khosla, T.N.: Environmental Concerns and Strategies (Ashish Publications House, New Delhi, 1999)
7. Kohli, V.K. & Kohli, Vikas: Environmental Pollution and Management (Vivek Publications, Ambala, 1995)
8. Mannion, A.M.: Natural Environmental Change (Routledge, London, 1999)
49
9. Rao, Shanker, C.N.: Sociology of Indian Society (S. Chand and Company Ltd, New Delhi, 2000)
10. Reid, Damid: Sustainable Development (Earth Scan Publications Ltd, London, 1995)
11. Tivy, Joy & Greg O’ Hare: Human Impact on the Ecosystem (Oliver & Boyd, Edinburg, 1981)
12. Trevedi, P.R.: Encyclopedia of Environmental Pollution, Planning and Conservation
(Vol. -I-VI) (A.P.H. Co., New Delhi, 2000)

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
IF U DIDN'T GOT , WHAT UR LUKING FOR REQUEST US BY CONTACTING US CLICK ON CONTACT US!