Wednesday, 10 August 2011

SYLLABUS AND CURRICULA FOR B.A. HONS (EDUCATION) B.ED. COURSE WITH CHOICE BASED CREDIT SYSTEM OF PUNJAB UNIVERSITY, CHANDIGARH

FOUR YEAR INTEGRATED COURSE
B.A. Hons. (Edu.) B.Ed.
Four Year Integrated Course in B.A. Hons. (Edu.) B.Ed. in the proposed Institute of Educational
Technology and Vocational Education started with the initial intake of 100 students (as per
minutes of P.U. Syndicate meeting dated 14-7-2007). Later the number of seats were reduced to 50
(as per minutes of P.U. Senate meeting dated 10-10-2010)
Rules regulating admission and promotions to B.A.Hons.(Edu.) B.Ed. Four Year
Integrated Course (8 semesters)
1. B.A. Hons. (Edu.) B.Ed. Four Year Integrated Course shall be a self-financing course.
2. B.A. Hons. (Edu.) B.Ed. shall be a Four Year Integrated Course comprising of eight
semesters. Each academic year shall be divided into two semesters:
a) From July to December
b) From January to May
3. Minimum qualifications for admission to first semester of the course shall be:
a) 10+2 Examination of any Board/University, which is recognized by the Panjab
University as equivalent, to it with at least 50% marks (45% marks in case of SC/ST).
b) The candidate must not be more than 20 years of age as on 1st August of the year in
which admission is sought to the first semester (22 years in case of SC/ST).
c) The admission shall be on such criteria (academic merit or entrance test or both etc.)
as may be prescribed by the Syndicate/Senate from time to time.

4. Every candidate admitted to the course shall pay such fee and funds or other charges as
may be prescribed by the Syndicate/Senate from time to time.
5. A candidate admitted to the course shall be eligible to appear in a semester examination if
he/she has attended at least 75% of the lectures required in prescribed course component
during the semester. Provided that the deficiency in this attendance requirement may be
condoned as follows:
a) Up to 15% lectures in a paper(s) to the best advantage of the student and up to 10%
lectures in various special lectures/visits to schools or other institutions by the Head/
Chairperson/ Director.
b) The Vice–Chancellor, in exceptional cases, on the recommendation of the
Head/Chairperson/Director, may condone up to 10 lectures in a paper(s) to the best
advantage of the student, beyond the condonation done by the Head/
Chairperson/Director.
6.
a) A paper of 100 marks will be equated with 5 credits.
b) The total credits a student of B.A. B.Ed. Course will earn is 300. This also remains
minimum numbers of credits that a student of B.A. B.Ed. Course must clear to pass the
Course.
c) Maximum number of credits a student can earn is 340 with a condition that she/he will
not be allowed to clear more than one course of 5 credits in each semester or two
courses of lesser no. of credits in a semester. A student will not be permitted to take
three courses making upto 5 credits in one semester as additional courses.
d) The total number of students in a course will not exceed beyond 55 after admitting
students from outside the institute and within the University.
e) Relative grading will be followed. Range of Highest and Lowest marks will be subjected
to 0% to 100% while making 10 categories as under and respective grades will be
allotted.
3
0-----10-----20-----30-----40-----50-----60-----70-----80-----90-----100
F E D C C+ B B+ A A+
7. To be declared pass in a semester examination, a candidate must have obtained at least:
a) 40% marks grade point upto 5 (C grade) in each paper of the semester examination.
b) 40% marks grade points upto 5 ( C grade) in the internal assessment/project reports/
term papers/ visits to schools or other institutions etc for each paper. These marks
shall be on such basis/ criteria as approved by the Syndicate/ Senate from time to
time.
8.
i) Promotion from 1st to 2nd, 3rd to 4th, 5th to 6th, 7th to 8th semester shall be allowed if a
candidate has fulfilled the attendance and other requirements even though who has
failed/ has failed to appear in the examination for the semester respectively from which
he is being promoted., with a reappear.
ii) Promotion from 2nd to 3rd, 4th to 5th, and 6th to 7th semester shall be allowed only if
he has passed at least 60% of the papers of the 1st to 2nd, 3rd to 4th, and 5th to 6th,
semester respectively as the case may be.
iii) A candidate who gets reappear in paper(s) may pass the same in a total of two
consecutive chances irrespective of promotion. However, if a student has cleared 80%
of the papers of all the semesters preceding the semester in which he has to be
admitted, he will be entitled to avail one more chance to clear the remaining papers on
the recommendation of the Head/ Chairperson/ Director, if the candidate fails to clear
the remaining papers even after availing all these (three in all) chances, he will seek
fresh admission in first semester provided he is eligible to continue as per rules. (This
para was substituted by syndicate in its meeting held on 24.9.2006, Agenda Item-
71).
iv) All the papers of the 4 year course must be passed within 7 years from the date of the
admission to the first semester of the course. However, the number of chances to be
availed per subject will be governed by University rules.
v) On passing all the examinations of 8 semesters, the aggregate of semester grade
points will be entered in the certificate in the form of cumulative grade point or grade
point index.
9. The medium of instruction shall be English only. However, examination
may be allowed in English, Hindi or Punjabi.
10. Candidates will be allowed to improve their performance in any paper. The number of chance
will be governed by the prevailing University rules.
11. The teaching learning processes will be as follows:
a) In all the papers 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of
lectures, discussions and presentations by the teacher.
b) 20% marks will be allocated to internal assessment based on mid term examination,
classroom discussions, attendance, seminar and snap test.
c) The remaining 20% will be covered in the form of Individualized sessional work
(supervised by the concerned teachers) comprising project work, team presentations,
individual term papers, and assignment. In all papers except English (Compulsory) and
Punjabi (Compulsory)/HCP. In these papers, C component mentioned above is not
there.
12. For first three years, the course will consist of:
A). TWO COURSES IN EDUCATION: Paper I: 100 marks (5 credits)
Paper II: 100 marks ( 5 credits)
4
B). CORE SUBJECTS: These would include:
Paper III: English 100 marks ( 5 Credits)
Paper IV: Punjabi 100 marks ( 5 Credits)
OR
History and Culture of Punjab 100 marks ( 5 Credits)
C). OPTIONAL SUBJECTS: These would include:
Papers V & VI : 100+100 marks ( 10 Credits)
The student is required to take up two elective/optional subjects from the nine options listed
below.
1) English
2) Hindi
3) Punjabi
4) History
5) Geography
6) Economics
7) Political Science
8) Sociology
9) Mathematics
(Note: Out of languages, only one can be selected)
D) GENERAL PRACTICUM AND TUTORIAL GROUPS (COMPULSORY)
General practicum will be split into three sections:
i) SCHOOL RELATED PRACTICUM: (100 Marks – Internal: 5 Credits )
This will involve activities related with school functioning / classroom teaching,
specified for each semester.
ii) LIFE SKILLS TRAINING: (100 Marks – Internal: 5 Credits)
This will involve training in two life skills in each semester
• Learning to know (cognitive abilities): decision making, problem solving, critical
thinking skills and creative thinking skills
• Learning to be (personal abilities): skills of increasing internal locus of control and
skills for managing feelings and stress
• Learning to live together (interpersonal abilities): self management skills,
communication skills, skill of empathy, skill of cooperative and team work
• Learning to do (practical skills)
iii) TUTORIALS
The students will be associated with one teacher, who will supervise individual
progress on school related practicum, improvement in life skills, sessional work of various subjects,
general problems related to academics and interaction among themselves etc. Also, the talent of
individual students will be explored and nurtured.
13. All papers except B.A. compulsory papers will consist of 100 marks i.e.60 marks ( 3 Credits)for
theory paper + 20 marks ( 1 Credit) for individualsed sessional work ( Subject – related practicum)
and 20 marks ( 1 Credit) for internal assessment. Compulsory papers have 80 marks ( 4 Credits) for
external exam in theory and 20 marks ( 1 Credit) for internal assessment.
A). INDIVIDUALISED SESSIONAL WORK/ SUBJECT RELATED
5
PRACTICUM will include the following:
a) Team presentations / quiz on the topic of that particular subject relating it with
education (5 marks: 0.25 Credit)
b) Project work related to that paper( to be specified by the teacher concerned with in
prescribed tentative projects (10 marks: 0.5
Credit)
c) Assignment/term paper (5 marks: 0.25 Credit)
Each paper of 100 marks (5 Credits) will be covered through 5 periods per week and papers
carrying weightage of 50 marks ( 2.5 Credits ) will be covered in 3 periods per week.
B) INTERNAL ASSESSMENT of 20 marks (1 Credit) will be based on scores of mid term
examination, attendance, seminar, classroom interactions and snap test.
14. The students will have two options in fourth year
i) Those who want to have degree in Bachelor of Education
B.Ed.(Elementry ) will have to put in two more Semesters
With a focus on pedagogy related to elementary school
level
ii) Those who opt for B.Ed (secondary) will also put in two
more semesters with theoretical and pedagogical focus
on secondary school level
15 IV Year details are as under – VII Semester
• Papers in Education – 4 Compulsory
• Choice of elementary education – 4 Compulsory pedagogy papers
• Choice of secondary education – two teaching papers out of eight
The student in 8th semester will be required to take up one vocational subject i.e. computer
education.
16. Fee Structure (Semester- wise)
• For regular students ---- as prescribed by syndicate from time
to time
• One time registration fee ---- for regular students---as per
University rules
• Plus other university charges not covered above
*Rules related to Credit based system mentioned above will be super ceded by any rules which are
prepared by University towards this.
6
B.A. Hons. (Edu.) B.Ed.
SEMESTER–I (Session 2011-12)
COURSE STRUCTURE FOR SEMESTER I
S.N. NATURE SUBJECT CODE SUBJECT TITLE LECTURE TUTORIAL PRACTICAL CREDITS
1 COMPULSORY BABED-ENGC11 ENGLISH 5 0 0 5
2 ONE OF
TWO
BABED-PBIC11
BABED-HCPC11
PUNJABI
HISTORY &
CULTURE OF
PUNJAB
5
5
0
0
0
0
5
5
3 &
4
TWO OF
NINE
BABED-ECOO11
BABED-ENGO11
BABED-GEOO11
BABED-HINO11
BABED-HISO11
BABED-MATO11
BABED-POLO11
BABED-PBIO11
BABED-SOCO11
ECONOMICS
ENGLISH
GEOGRAPHY
HINDI
HISTORY
MATHS
POLITICAL SCI
PUNJABI
SOCIOLOGY
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5 &
6
COMPULSORY BABED-EDUC01
BABED-EDU02
EDUCATION IN
EMERGING
INDIAN SOCIETY
SCHOOL
PLANNING and
ORGANIZATION
4
4
0
0
1
1
5
5
7 COMPULSORY BABED-SRPC11 SCHOOL RELATED
PRACTICUM
2 0 3
(IN FIELD)
5
8 COMPULSORY BABED-LSTC11 LIFE SKILLS
TRAINING
4 0 1
(IN LIBRARY)
5
GRAND TOTAL
40
7
PAPER I: BABED-EDU01: EDUCATION IN EMERGING INDIAN SOCIETY
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester the students will be able to:
• describe development of Indian society from ancient period to an independent nation.
• state various features of constitution and provisions of education in Indian constitution.
• explain the relationship of education with socio economic issue such as poverty,
inequality and unemployment.
• explain the emergence of system of education in Indian democratic set-up.
• describe the appraisal of various commissions and committees after the
commencement of constitution.
• explain in detail the role of education in social and cultural change.
Course Content
Unit I
Main features of education in India: Vedic, Buddhist and Medieval
and British period
Unit II Educational provisions of education in the Indian constitution; concurrent status of
education
Unit III Economic and political issues: poverty, inequality and unemployment; main
features of the democratic system at central, state-level and local systems of
government
Unit IV Appraisals of various commissions and committees after the commencement of
constitution: Mudaliar commission, Kothari commission, National Policy of
Education 1986, 1992
Unit V Social and cultural issues: education for social change, role of education in bringing
social change. Culture: concept, characteristics and its interaction with education
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized sessional
work which will include:
• for unit I the class will be divided into 6 teams constituting of 5 to 6 students and each
team will be given an assignment.
• unit 3 will be covered through the activity like project work which will be done through
survey method e.g. a locality may be identified and a sample survey be taken up to
study relationship among poverty , inequality and unemployment in that region.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will
be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3
credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term
papers and seminars (20 marks: 1 credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions,etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
8
Suggested Readings
1. Walia, J.S. (2006), Education in Emerging Indian Society. Paul Publishers, Jalandhar.
2. Walia, J.S. (2007), Development of Educational system in India. Paul Publishers, Jalandhar.
3. Saxena, N.R. & Chaturvedi, S. (2008), Education in Emerging Indian Society. R.Lall
Publishers, Meerut.
4. Singh R.P. (1993), Indian Education- In Depth Studies. Commonwealth Publishers, New
Delhi.
5. Mathur, S.S. (1986), A Sociological Approach to Indian Education. Vinod Pustak Mandir, Agra.
6. Chaube, S.P. (2006), Problems of Indian Education. Vinod Pustak Mandir, Agra.
7. Chand, T. (2005), Development of Educational system in India. Anmol Publications, New
Delhi.
8. Bhatia, K.K. (2008), Development of Education System in India. Tandon Publications,
Ludhiana.
9. Bhatia, K.K. (2009), Development of Education System in India. Kalyani Publications,
Ludhiana.
10. Aggarwal, J.C. (2004), Development of Education system in India. Shipra Publications, New
Delhi.
11. Pandey, R.S. (1992), National Policy on Education. Harison Publishers, Allahabad.
9
PAPER II: BABED-EDU02: SCHOOL PLANNING & ORGANIZATION
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the students will be able to:
• differentiate between the concepts of school administration and school management
• describe a school plant and its characteristics
• describe institutional planning along with its all facets
• describe the characteristics of principal and teachers
• explain the principles of time- table
• explain the concept of discipline and causes of indiscipline
Course Content
Unit I
Unit II
Unit III
Unit IV
Unit V
Nature and functions of organization; difference between school
administration and management; concept of organisation; needs,
scope and objectives of school organization
School plant – importance, essential characteristics, equipment and optimum
utilization, maintenance of different school components
Need and importance of planning; types of plans, levels of planning; planning at
institutional level; its meaning, objectives, advantages and characteristics
School personnel : principal, teachers their qualities, functions and general recruitment
policies and procedures
Time table: importance, types and principles of timetable construction. Discipline:
bases of discipline, causes of indiscipline and its remedial measures
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized sessional work which will
include:
• for unit 1, the class will be divided into different groups and
each group will survey a school of different type under the
supervision of teacher.
• for unit 5, paper presentations on the causes of indiscipline and suggested remedial
measures.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
I. Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students
will be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3
credits).
II. Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term
papers and seminars (20 marks: 1 credit).
10
III. Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Suggested Readings
1. Sodhi, T.S. & Suri, A. (2002). Management of School Education. Bawa Publications, Patiala-
147002.
2. Sachdeva, M.S. (1992). A New Approach to school Management. Vinod Publication,
Educational Publishers, Ludhiana-141008.
3. Walia, J.S. (2007), Fundamental of School Administration and Organisation. Paul Publihsers,
Jalandhar.
4. Aggarwal, J.C. (2006), School Management and Pedagogies of Education. Vinod Pustak
Mandir, Agra.
5. Vashist, S.R. (2004), School Administration. Anmol Publications, New Delhi.
6. Bhoomireddy, N and Bhatia, K.K. (2009), School Organization Management and
Administration. Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi.
7. Mishra, R.C. (2007), School Administration and Organization. APH Publishers, New Delhi.
8. Mohanty, J. (2004), School Management. Deep and Deep Publications. New Delhi.
9. Sharma, B.M. (2007), School Administration. Commonwealth Publishers, New Delhi.
11
PAPER III: BABED-ENGC11: ENGLISH (COMPULSORY)
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives:
At the end of semester, the students will be able to:
• Make use of competence in all the four skills i.e. Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing.
• Describe and use new pedagogic practices in the teaching of both language and literature.
• Devise and promote student centric pedagogic techniques for the teaching of English.
• Describe implications of teaching/learning language through literature.
Course Content
Unit I
Poems 1 to 8 from the text Slice of Life ed by Prof. Meera Malik, Published by Publication
Bureau, P.U., Chandigarh.
Unit II
Short stories 1, 2, 3 from the text Slice of Life ed by Prof. Meera Malik, Published by
Publication Bureau, PU, Chandigarh.
Unit III
Prose 1, 2 from the text Slice of Life ed by Prof. Meera Malik, Published by Publication
Bureau, PU, Chandigarh.
Unit IV
• Voice Narration
• Prepositions and conjuctions
Unit V
• Letter writing (Personal)
• Paragraph writing (Descriptive/Narrative)
Prescribed text:
Slice of Life ed by Prof. Meera Malik, Published by Publication Bureau, Panjab University,
Chandigarh.
Teaching Learning Experiences
12
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of internal assessment based on terminal
examinations, attendance, classroom interactions, etc.
Evaluation Scheme
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions i.e. two questions from each unit with internal
choice. The students will be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (80 marks: 4
credits).
ii) Internal assessment will be based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 credit)).
Suggested Reading
1. Gupta, A.& Sawhney (2008) Modern Essay, A.P.H. Publishing House, New Delhi.
2. Satya, R.K.(2007), Modern Methods of Teaching English, APH Publishing Corporation, New
Delhi.
3. Sethi, M.(2008), Handbook of Standard English and Indian Usage: Vocabulary and Grammer,
PHI Learning Pvt Ltd, New Delhi.
4. William H.Hudson (2001), Outline History of English Literature, Atlantic Publishers, New York.
5. Paul S. (1998), Creative writing, Kalyani publishers, New Delhi.
6. Tripathy B.K., Nayak A (2007), Practical English Grammar, Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi.
13
PAPER IV: BABED-PBIC11: PUNJABI (COMPULSORY)
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
gzikph (bk÷wh)
;w?;No gfjbk
Objectives
• fJ; g/go dk wzst ejkDh s/ eftsk dhnK g[;seK dk fBeN nfXn?B eoBk j?.
• ftfdnkoEhnK B{z b/ye d/ ihtB s'A GKs ikD{ eotkT[Dk j?.
• gzikph ;kfjs ftZu b/yeK dh G{fweK pko/ ikDekoh d/Dk j?.
• ouBktK ftZu'A ftukoK B{z rqfjD eoB dh ;{M g?dk eoBk j?.
• ftnkeoD ftZu ôpdK d/ ftfGzB o{gK pko/ ;{M d/Dk j?. ;kfjs o{gK ns/
nbzekoK ;zpzXh ikDekoh d/Dk j?.
gkmeqw
1H nkX[fBe ekft-;zrw, ;zgk-vkH ;[fszdo f;zx B{o, gpbhe/ôB fpT{o',
gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ
2H eEk ejkDh, ;zgkH vkH XBtzs e"o, gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh,
uzvhrVQ
3H eth dk ihtB, ouBk ns/ :'rdkB
4H bx{ gqôB
5H ftnkeoD
Couse content
UNIT - 1
(T) nkX[fBe ekft-;zrw g[;se ftZu'A gq;zr ;fjs ftnkfynk (d'
ftZu'A fJZe) 8
(n) eftsk dk e/Adoh Gkt dZ; e/ ;ko (d' ftZu'A fJZe)
8
UNIT - 2
eEk-ejkDh (gfjbhnK S/ ejkDhnK d/ gq;zr ftZu) ftZu'A fe;/ fJZe ejkDh dk ;ko
(fszB ftZu'A fJe)
16
UNIT - 3
fBoXkos ethnK ftZu'A fe;/ fJe dk ihtB, ouBk ns/ ;kfjse :'rdkB (g{oB f;zx,
w'jB f;zx, ;[oihs gkso, nzfwqsk gqhsw, fôt e[wko pNkbth)
16 (fszB ftZu'A fJe)
UNIT – 4
14
nkX[fBe ekft ;zrw ns/ eEk p'X (gfjbhnK S/ ejkDhnK d/ gq;zr ftu) T[go
nkXkfos bx{ gqôB
2x8=16
UNIT - 5
(T) b/y (500 ôpdK ftu) ubzs wkwfbnK, ;wkfie w;fbnK, Gkôk ns/
gzikph ;fGnkuko Bkb ;zpzfXs (uko ftZu'A fJe)
8
(n) ftôokw fuzBQ 4
(J) ô[ZX-nô[ZX ns/ nr/so-fgS/so 4
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining 20% will be covered in the form of internal assessment
based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions, etc.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 80 marks (4 credit).
ii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Suggested Books:
1 ethnK dhnK eftsktK nbZr-nbZr ekft ;zrqfjnK ftZu'A bJhnK ikDrhnK.
2 eEk p'X-;zgk okw ;o{g nDyh (2006), gpbhe/ôB fpT{o' uzvhrVQ
3 gzikph Gkôk fbgh ns/ ftnkeoB - vkH ôod/t f;zx frZb(2006) b'e rhs
gqekôB, b[fXnkDk.
4 gzikph nfXn?B s/ nfXnkgB d/ w[Yb/ ;zebg - ihs f;zx i'ôh(1999), tko;
ôkj ckT{Av/ôB nzfwqs;o
5 gzikph ;kfjs dh T[sgsh s/ ftek; - gofwzdo f;zx, feogkb f;zx
e;/b(1968), bkj"o p[Ze ôkg b[fXnkDk
6 nkX[fBe gzikph ;kfjs dh o{go/yk (1850 s'A 1970) - i'frzdo f;zx(2002)
gpbhe/ôB fpUo', gzikph :{Bh, gfNnkbk
7 gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; - (nkX[fBe ekb 1901 s'A 1995 sZe)-vka i;ftzdo
f;zx, vka wkB f;zx YhAv;k(1997), gpbhe/ôB fpU[o', gzikph :{Bha
gfNnkbk
8 nkX[fBe gzikph eftsk-gfotosB s/ gqftoshnK-vka G{fgzdo e"o (2004),
sob''uB gpfb;oi, uzvhrVQ.
9 nkX[fBe gzikph ekft XkoktK d/ ftukoXkokJh nkXko - vka eowihs
f;zx(1983), r[o{ BkBe d/t :{Bha nzfwqs;o
10 nkX[fBe gzikph eftsk dk ;[ji ôk;so-vka :'roki(1998), Gkosh-ro[g nkc
gpbhe/ôB, uzvhrVQ.
11 gzikph ftnkeoD-p{Nk f;zx prV, tko; ôkj ckT{Av/ôB, nzfwqs;o.
12 gqrshtkd-vkH ;[fozdo e[wko dt/ôto (2008), b'e rhs gqekôB, b[fXnkDk.
15
PAPER IV: BABED-HCPC11: HISTORY AND CULTURE OF PUNJAB
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the students will be able to
• describe the history and culture of Punjab related to the ancient period.
• describe history of Punjab and its culture traced from the Harappan culture to the
teachings of Buddhism and Jainism.
Unit- I
Physical features of the Punjab and their impact on history
Sources of the early history of the Punjab
Unit II
Harappan culture: principal places, town planning and causes of its disappearance
Features of social, economic and religious life of the Harappan people
Unit III
The lndo-Aryans: original home and settlement in Punjab; social, economic and religious life
during the Rig Vedic age
Origin and evolution of the caste system, its merits and demerits
Unit IV
The Ramayana and Mahabharata and their historical importance
The teachings of Buddhism and Jainism and their impact on the Punjab
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining 20% will be covered in the form of internal assessment based on
terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions, etc.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) In all nine questions will be set. Each question will carry 16 marks. ( 80 Marks: 4 credits)
i. First question shall be short answer type containing 12 short questions spread
over the whole syllabus. Candidates will attempt 8 out of the 12 questions in
about 25 to 30 words each. It shall carry 16 marks and shall be compulsory.
ii. Rest of the paper shall contain 4 units. Each unit shall have two essay type
questions, distributed evenly, and the candidate shall attempt one question
from each unit.
ii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions, etc.
(20 marks: 1 credit).
Suggested Readings
16
1. Joshi, L.M.(1989), History and Culture of the Punjab. Part I, Publication
Bureau, Punjabi University, Patiala.
2. Joshi, L.M. and Singh, F.(1977), History and Culture of the Punjab.
Vol. I. Punjabi University, Patiala.
3. Prakash, B. (1983), Glimpses of Ancient Punjab. Punjabi University, Patiala.
4. Thapar, R. (1966), A History of India. Vol. I. Penguin Books, New
Delhi.
5 . Basham, A.L.(1992), The Wonder That was India. Rupa Books, Calcutta
6. Sharma, B.N.(1966), Life in Northern India. Munshiram Manohar
Lal Publishers, New Delhi.
7. Walia, J.M.(1992), A History of The Punjab. Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana,
OPTIONAL SUBJECTS - PAPER V and VI (100 Marks each)
The student is required to take up two elective/optional subjects from the following nine
subjects. Each subject will be of 100 marks.
1) English
2) Hindi
3) Punjabi
4) History
5) Political Science
6) Economics
7) Sociology
8) Geography
9) Mathematics
17
1. ENGLISH (Elective)
BABED-ENGO11
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of semester, the students will be able to:
• make use of competence in all the four skills i.e. listening, speaking , reading and writing.
• describe implications of teaching/learning language through literature.
• develop the power of imagination through literature.
Course Content
Unit I
Poem No. 1 - On His Blindness (John Milton)
Poem No. 2 – The Village School Master (Oliver Goldsmith)
Poem No. 3 – The Daffodils (William Wordsworth)
Poem No. 4 – The Solitary Reaper (William Wordsworth )
Poem No. 5 – Night and Death (Joseph Blanco White)
Poem No. 6 – Ozymandias (P.B. Shelley )
Poem No. 7 – On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer (John Keats)
Poem No. 8 – La Belle Dame sans Merci (John Keats)
Poem No. 9 – Ulysses (Lord Tennyson )
Poem No. 10 – King Arthur’s Farewell (Lord Tennyson)
Poem No. 11 – Incident of the French Camp (Robert Browning )
From the book An Introduction to Poetry by A.G. Xavier)
Unit II
Story No 1 – A Cup of Tea ( Katherine Mansfield )
Story No 2 – The Black Cat ( Edgar Allen Poe )
Story No 3 – The Paradise of Thieves ( G.K. Chesterton )
Story No 4 – The Postmaster ( Rabindranath Tagore )
Story No 5 – The Ransom of Red Chief ( O. Henry )
Story No 6 – Dr. Heidegger’s Experiment ( Nathaniel Hawthorne )
From the book Twelve Short Stories by C.M. Sharma)
Unit III
Drama 1 – The Dear Departed ( Stanley Houghton )
Drama 2 – Hewers of Coal ( Joe Corrie )
Drama 3 – The Bishop’s Candlesticks ( Norman Mckinnel )
From the book Before the Footlights by R.M. Sharma , B.N. Sethi and N.C. Uday
Unit IV
18
Paragraph writing (based on an outline, situation etc)
Applied Grammar: Voice, Narration
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work comprising:
• prepare a project report on literary work of any poet mentioned in the course content.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 credits). There shall be 9 questions in all.
ii) The first question shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory.
It will consist of ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12
marks). In addition eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two
from each of four units of the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to
attempt one from each unit. (12x4 = 48 marks).
iii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 credit).
iv) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Suggested Readings:
1. Tickoo, M.L.& Subramaniaum, A.E.(1997), Living English Grammar and Composition.
Orient Longman Ltd, Mumbai.
2. Sethi, M. (2008), Handbook of Standard English and Indian Usage: Vocabulary and
Grammer. PHI Learning Pvt Ltd, New Delhi.
3. Xavier A.G. (2004), An Introduction to Poetry. MacMillan Publishers, New Dehli.
4. Sharma C.M. (2005), 12 Short Stories. Oxford University Press. New Dehli.
5. Sharma, R.M., Sethi, B.L. and Uday,N.C. (2008), Before the Footlights. Publication
Bureau, Panjab University, Chandigarh.
2. HINDI (ELECTIVE)
BABED-HINO11
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
vè;kiu izfØ;k ds lekiu ds mijkar fo|kFkhZ A
• + fn, x, dforkvksa dh ikB~;oLrq ds lanHkZ esa O;k[;k djsaxs A
• + ikB~;Øe esa nh xbZ dgkuh;ksa ds lanHkZ O;k[;k iz'u djsaxs A
• + vkfndky ds lkfgR; dk ukedj’k] dky lhek] ifjfLFkfr;ksa o izo`fr;ksa dk o’kZu djsaxs A
• + jkt jklks rFkk chly nso jklks dk ifjp; fy[ksxsa A
19
• + HkfDrdky dh ifjfLFkfr;ksa dk la{ksi o’kZu djsaxs A
• + lUrdkO; izek’k;kud dkO;] jkedkO; o d`"’k dkO; esa foHksn o fo'ks"krk,a fyf[kxsa A
• + dchj] tk;lh] rqylh vkSj lwjnkl ds thou pfj=k o dkO; in
Course Content
UNIT I
dforkyksd
lañ Mkñ f'kodqekj 'kekZ] ifCyds'ku C;wjks] iatkc fo'ofo|ky;] p.Mhx<+ }kjk izdkf'krA
bu lkr dfo;ksa dh jpuk,a ikB~;Øe esa fu/kZfjr dh xbZ gSa %&
dchj] jSnkl] xq:ukud nso] lwjnkl] ehjkckbZ] rqylhnkl vkSj fxfj/j dfojk;A
bl [k.M esa dfo ifjp;] dfork lkj rFkk mís'; lEcU/h iz'u iwNs tk,¡xsaA
Unit II
ltho dgkfu;k¡
lañ Mkñ y{ehpUnz [kqjkuk] ifCyds'ku C;wjks] iatkc fo'ofo|ky;] p.Mhx<+ }kjk izdkf'krA fuEufyf[kr
lkr dgkfu;k¡ ikB~;Øe esa gS%
'krjat ds f[kykM+h] eerk] vf'kf{kr dk ân;] ekSr ds eqag esa] U;k; ea=kh] xqykc] lEHk&vlH;A
bl [k.M esa dFkkoLrq] pfj=k&fp=k.k ,oa mís'; ls lEcfU/r dqy nks iz'u iwNs tk,¡xsA
Unit III
fgUnh lkfgR; dk bfrgkl
vkfndky dk ukedj.k] dky lhek] ifjfLFkfr;k¡] izo`fÙk;k¡ vkSj i`Foh jkt jklks rFkk chly nso jklks dk ifjp;A
Unit IV
HkfDrdky dh ifjfLFkfr;ka] lUrdkO;] izsek[;kud dkO;] jkedkO; vkSj d`".k dkO; dh fo'ks"krk,a] dchj] tk;lh]
rqylh vkSj lwjnklA
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions
and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized sessional work.
Project
1- fgUnh dh fdlh ,d iqLrd dh leh{kk A
2- fdlh egku fgUnh dfo dh thouh rFkk vkRedFkk fy[ksaA
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 credits). The syllabus has been divided into four
units. There shall be 9 questions in all.
ii) The first question shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory.
It will consist of ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12
marks). In addition eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two
from each of four units of the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to
attempt one from each unit. (12x4 = 48 marks).
iii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 credit).
iv) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Suggested Readings
20
1) lañ Mkñ y{ehpUnz [kqjkuk ( 2007)] ifCyds'ku C;wjks] iatkc fo'ofo|ky;] p.Mhx<+ }kjk
izdkf'krA
2) euksgj yky vkuUn (2006) rajafx.kh] iatkc ;wfuoflZvh ifCyds'ku C;wjks] p.Mhx<+A
3) lañ Mk- lalkj pUnz (2006) vkn'kZ ,dkadh laxzg] iatkc ;wfuoflZvh ifCyds'ku C;wjks]
p.Mhx<+ }kjk izdkf'krA
4) fnf{kr HkkxhjFk (2003)] leh{kkyksd] bUnzizLFk izdk'ku] fnYyhA
5) tSu fueZyk (2006)] ubZ leh{kk ds izfreku] us'kuy ifCyf'kax gkml] fnYyhA
6) prqosZnh jkts'oj izlkj (2008) fgUnh O;kdj.k] midkj izdk'ku] vkxjkA
7) lkguh ,l- ch- 'kekZ vkj- ih- (2007) loksZÙke fgUnh O;kdj.k] lkguh izdk'ku] vkxjkA
8) o`Unkou yky oekZ (1995), >kalh dh jkuh e;wj izdk'ku] >kalh
9) uxsUnz gjn;ky (2009) fgUnh lkfgR; dk bfrgkl] e;wj isijcSDl] uks;M+kA
10) jktkjke dYiuk (2009) fuca/ cks/] LisDVªe cqDl izk- fy-] fnYyhA
21
3. PUNJABI (ELECTIVE)
BABED-PBIO11
gzikph n/befNt
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
• fJ; g/go dk wzst ftfdnkoEhnK dh wZXekbh gzikph eftsk ;zpzXh ikDekoh
B{z j'o ft;Eko d/Dk j?.
• gzikph ;kfjs d/ fJfsjk; ftZu ftfdnoEhnK dh fdbu;gh g?dk eoBk j?.
• fJeKrh d/ fJfsjk; pko/ v{zxh ikDekoh d/Dk j?.
gkmeqw
1. ôpd ;t/ok, (;zgkH) vkH jfoGiB f;zx, gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gzikp
:{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ
2. S/ doôB, ;zs f;zx ;/y'A, gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ
3. bx{ gqôB
4. ;kfjs d/ o{g
Course Content
UNIT - 1
(T) ôpd ;t/ok g[;se ftZu'A gq;zr ;fjs ftnkfynk (d' ftZu'A fJe)
7
(n) fe;/ fJe eftsk dk ;ko e/Adoh Gkt dZ; e/ fby' (d' ftZu'A fJe)
8
UNIT - 2
ôpd ;t/ok ns/ S/ doôB d/ nkXko T[go bx{ gqôB (nZm ftZu'A gzi)
15
UNIT - 3
S/ doôB (gfjbhnK 3 fJeKrhnK) nkXko s/ d'tK ftu'A e'Jh fJZe gqôB eo'.
(i) fJeKrh dk ;ko
(ii) gkso
(iii) ;kfjse goy 15
UNIT - 4
;kfjs d/ o{g d/ nkXko s/ d'tK ftu'A e'Jh fJZe gqôB eo'.
(i) gZNh
(ii) pkokwkj
(iii) iBw;kyh 15
Teaching Learning Exercises
22
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized sessional
work.
Project work
• ;zs f;zx ;/y'A dk gzikph ;kfjs ns/ nb'uBk ftZu :'rdkB
• S/ fJekrhA g[;se d/ nkXko s/ fe;/ fJZe fJekrhAeko d/ ihtB ns/ ouBk
pko/ fby' L
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 credits)
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Suggested Readings
1. S/ doôB, (;zgkH) fgzqH ;zs f;zx ;/y'A gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gzikp
:{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ :{fBN s/ Ehw - 2
2. gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; 1700 JhH sZe(2003), gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ
3. gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; 1700 JhH se(1972), gzikph :{Bhtof;Nh,
gfNnkbk
4. gzikph ;kfjs dh T[sgsh s/ ftek;, gofwzdo f;zx s/ feogkb f;zx
e;/b(1968), bkj"o p[Ze ôkg, b[fXnkDk.
5. ôpd ;t/ok (;zgkH vkH jfoGiB f;zx)(2007) gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gzikp
:{Bhtof;Nh uzvhrVQ
6. gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; - vkH jfoGiB f;zx (1972), Gkôk ftGkr gzikp,
gfNnkbk.
7. wXekbh gzikph ;kfjs ftt/eL- vkH nwoihs f;zx eKr, vkH i;gkb e"o eKr,
BkBe f;zx g[;sewkbk, nzfwqs;o.
23
4. HISTORY
BABED-HISO11
HISTORY OF INDIA UPTO 1200 A.D
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester the student will be able to:
• describe history in the context of Indian geography and socio-cultural milieu before 1200 A.D.
• explain , analyze and relate major political, social, religious and cultural changes of the time
from beginning of Indus-valley civilization up to the rise of Rajput powers.
Course Content
.
Unit-I
i) Geography and history: the physical features and their influence on the course of
Indian history
ii) Major sources of ancient Indian history: literary sources; archaeological findings;
inscriptions; coins; travel accounts
iii) Harappan civilization: extent; town planning; social conditions; economy and religion
Unit-II
i) Vedic period: original home of the Aryans; political, social-economic and religious life
in the early Vedic period developments in the later Vedic period
ii) Jainism and Buddhism: causes responsible for the rise of new religions; life and
teachings of Mahavir Swami; life and teachings of Gautam Buddha
iii) Greek invasion: political conditions on the eve of Alexander's invasion; Alexander's
invasion and its impact
Unit-III
i) The Mauryan Empire: conquests of Chandragupta Maurya; Ashoka's Dhamma;
administration under the Mauryas
ii) Post Mauryan period: decline of the Mauryan Empire; Kanishka and his achievements
iii) The Gupta Empire: achievements of Samudragupta and Chandragupta-II; social,
economic, cultural and scientific developments under Guptas
Unit-IV
i) The age of Vardhanas: campaigns of Harsha Vardhan; administration; literary and
religious activities of Harsha Vardhan
ii) The Rajputs: origin of the Rajputs; polity, society and culture under the Rajputs
iii) map :
a) Important historical places: Taxila, Indraprastha, Kurukshetra,
Kannauj, Patliputra, Ujjain, Bodhgaya, Varanasi, Sopara, Ajanta, Ellora,
Sanchi, Tanjore and Kanchi
b) Extent of the Mauryan empire
24
c) Gupta empire under Samudragupta
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized sessional work comprising:
• use of maps for depicting territorial regions during the empires of Mauryans and Guptas
etc.
• visit to Buddha / Mahavir temple of the region.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 credits). There shall be 9 questions in all.
ii) The first question shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory.
It will consist of ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12
marks). In addition eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two
from each of four units of the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to
attempt one from each unit. (12x4 = 48 marks).
iii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 credit).
iv) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Suggested Readings
1. Basham, A.L.(1992), The Wonder That was India. Rupa Books, Calcutta.
2. Sharma, B.N.(1966),Life in Northern India. Munshiram Manohar Lal Publishers, Delhi.
3. Thapar, R. (1966), A History of India. Vol. I, Penguin Books, New Delhi.
4. Chandra, S.(2009), History of Medieval India. Orientblack Swan Publishers, Hyderabad.
5. Naravane, M.S. (2008), Battles of Medieval India (A.D 1295-1850). APH Publishers, New
Delhi.
6. Murthy, K.S. (2008), Medieval Indian Culture and Political Geography. APH Publishers, New
Delhi.
7. Chandel, L.S. (1989), Early Medieval State- study of Delhi Sultanate. Commonwealth
Publisher, New Delhi.
8. Chand, D.P. & Rajshree, S. (2006), Landmarks in Indian History (Ancient & Medival). Kalyani
Publishers, Ludhiana.
9. Seshan, R. (2006), Medieval India: Problems and Possibilities. Rawat Publication, Jaipur.
10. Chaurasia, R.S.(2002), History of Medieval Indian: from 1000A.D to 1707 A.D. Atlantic
Publishers, New Delhi.
11. Keene, H.G. (2000),The Fall of The Moghul Empire. Atlantic Publishers, New Delhi.
12. Habib, I. (1998), Medieval India-1. Oxford University Press, London.
13. Nath, R (2008), Medieval Indian History and Architecture. APH Publishers, New Delhi.
14. Chattopadhyaya, D.P. & Grewal, J.S.(2006), Religious Movements and Institutions in
Medieval India. Oxford University Press, London.
15. Bakshi, S.R., Sharma, S.K.(2008), Maratha Diplomacy and Foreign Policy, Deep & Deep
Publications, New Delhi.
16. Khanna, M. (2009), Cultural History of Medieval India. Orientblack Swan, Hyderabad.
17. Malleson, G.B.(2006), Akbar & The Rise of The Mughal Empire. Rupa & Co., New Delhi.
18. Jayapalan, N.(2007), History of India. Vol. 2, Atlantic Publishers, New Delhi.
25
5. POLITICAL SCIENCE
BABED-POLO11
POLITICAL THEORY- I
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of semester, the students will be able to:
• differentiate the concept of political science and politics.
• describe and discriminate the various ancient, traditional and modern political theories.
• describe relationship between political science and other social sciences and education.
• explain the concept of state and its importance.
• discuss the relationship of state with other institutions i.e. the government, society,
association and the nation.
• describe and discriminate the theories of the origin of state like evolutionary and social
contract.
• explain and discriminate the liberal, Marxian and Gandhian viewpoint about the origin of
state.
• highlight and differentiate characteristic features of theories of sovereignty.
Course Content
Unit-I
Political theory: ancient, traditional and modern
Distinction between political science and political theory
Relationship of political science with economics, education, history, sociology and education
Unit-II
The state: definition, elements and its distinction from government and society
Theories of the origin of state: social contract, historical/evolutionary
Unit-III
State: liberal, Marxian and Gandhian view
Functions of state: liberal and socialist perspective with special reference to education
Welfare state: concept and functions
Unit-IV
Sovereignty: definition, attributes and types
Theories of sovereignty: monistic and pluralistic
Political system: meaning, characteristics, political system as an input – output process
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized sessional work comprising:
• preparing scrap book on the functions of state.
• library reference guided to Political Science.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
26
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 credits). There shall be 9 questions in all.
ii) The first question shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory.
It will consist of ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12
marks). In addition eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two
from each of four units of the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to
attempt one from each unit. (12x4 = 48 marks).
iii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 credit).
iv) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Sugessted Readings
1. Johri, J.C. (1979), Principles of Political Science. Sterling Publishers, New Delhi.
2. Verma, S.P. (1974), Political Theory. Geetanjali Publishing House, New Delhi.
3. Kapoor, A.C. (1950), Principles of Political Science. S. Charld & Company, New Delhi.
4. Ashirvatham, E. (1985), Political Theory. S. Chand &. Company, New Delhi.
5. Jain, M.P. (1985), Political Theory. Authors Guild Publication, Delhi (Punjabi & Hindi).
6. David, E. (1960), The Political System. Scientific Book Agency, Calcutta.
7. Bhattacharya, D.C.(1981), Political Theory. Vijay Publishing House, Calcutta.
8. Gauba, O.P.(2005), An Introduction to Political Theory. Macmillan India Ltd., New
Delhi.
9. Macphesson, C.B. (1979), Democratic Theory. Oxford Press, London.
10. Badyal, J.S. (2007), Political Theory. Raj Publishers,Jalandhar.
27
6. ECONOMICS
BABED-ECOO11
MICRO ECONOMICS
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of semester, the students will be able to:
• describe the origin of economics.
• explain the various types and time periods of production.
• describe the various forms of markets.
• describe the existence of various types of sellers and variety of products in the market.
• enlist various factors of production and explain how these factors receive payments in lieu
of their services.
Course content
Unit-I
Introduction: meaning, nature and scope of economics, definition of economics (Adam smith,
Marshall and Robbins)
Theory of demand and consumer behaviour: utility analysis and indifference curve analysis;
consumer's surplus and its measurements; law of demand and its exceptions; elasticity of demand
and its measurement
Unit-II
Theory of production and costs: concept and types of production function, laws of returns to
scale and law of variable proportions; cost concepts and cost curves in short and long periods
(traditional theory of costs)
Market forms and revenue: behaviour of average revenue and marginal revenue under perfect
and imperfect competition; relationship between average revenue, marginal revenue and elasticity of
demand
Unit-III
Price and output determination: price and output determination of the firm and industry under
perfect competition in the short and long run; firm's equilibrium under monopoly in the short and long
run; discriminating monopoly, and monopolistic competition
Unit-IV
Distribution: marginal productivity theory and modern theory of wage determination, concept of rent
and quasi rent; Ricardian theory and modern theory of rent; concept of interest, classical and loan
able funds theory; concept of profit, gross and net profit, risk and uncertainty theories of profit
Teaching Learning Experience
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized sessional work comprising:
28
• market survey of consumer surplus or market survey of law of demand or market survey of
monopolistic competition and selling cost.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 credits). There shall be 9 questions in all.
ii) The first question shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory.
It will consist of ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12
marks). In addition eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two
from each of four units of the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to
attempt one from each unit. (12x4 = 48 marks).
iii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 credit).
iv) Internal Assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Suggested Readings
1. Lipsey,R.G. & Chrystal, K.A.(2004),Economics. 10th Edition, Oxford University Press, New
Delhi.
2. Salvatore,D.(2003),Micro Economics: Theory & Applications. Oxford University Press, New
York.
3. Singh,M.(1971),Mang Sidhant Ate Mishrat Arth-Vivstha Vich Arthik Ganana. Punjabi
University, Patiala, 1971.
4. Ray, N.C.(1980), An introduction to Micro Economics. The Macmillan Company of India, New
Delhi.
5. Chopra,P.N.(1998), Micro Economic Theory and Welfare Economics. Kalyani Publishers, New
Delhi.
6. Ahuja, H.L.(1999), Advanced Economic Theory. S.Chand &Co., New Delhi.
7. Chopra,P.N.(2006), Advanced Economic Theory. Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi.
8. Lekhi, R.K.,Walia, H.S. & Talwar,S.J.(2003), Micro Economics. Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi.
9. Vohra, P.& Mehta,R.(2007), Micro Economics. Commonwealth Publishers, New Delhi.
10. Mukherjee,(2008), Micro Economics. PHI Learning Private Ltd., New Delhi.
11. Mandal,R.K.(2007), Micro Economics Theory. Atlantic Publishers, New Delhi.
29
7. SOCIOLOGY
BABED-SOCO11
FUNDAMENTALS OF SOCIOLOGY
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the student will be able to
• describe fundamentals of sociology to the beginners of the subject;
• describe about sociology as a discipline.
• discuss study of various terms, concepts and processes which help in formulating a
sociological viewpoint and an easy comprehension of the discipline at later stages.
Course content
Unit-1
Introduction to sociology: definition, nature, relationship with other social sciences; history,
anthropology, psychology and education
Human society: meaning, characteristics; theories of origin of society -organic and socialcontract;
relationship between individual and society
Unit-II
Social groups - meaning, characteristics & classification, detailed discussion on primary and
secondary groups
Community – meaning, dimensions, bases and features of community
Unit-III
Culture: meaning, characteristics, dimensions, forms, culture and civilization, cultural lag,
conceptual understanding of acculturation, assimilation
Unit-IV
Socialization: meaning, aims, features, stages and agencies
Social control: meaning, importance, process, means and agencies
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized sessional work which will
include:
• visit to the library
• poster making on any topic of social issue.
• seminar on effective means of social control.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
30
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits). There shall be 9 questions in all.
ii) The first question shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory.
It will consist of ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12
marks). In addition eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two
from each of four units of the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to
attempt one from each unit. (12x4 = 48 marks).
iii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 credit).
iv) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Johnson, H.M. (1980), Sociology: A Systematic Introduction. Allied Publishers, Delhi.
2) Macionis, J.J. (2005), Society: The Basics. Prentice Hall. New York.
3) Parelins, A.R.(1978), The Sociology of Education. Prentice Hall, New Jersey.
4) Sharma, R.K. (2008), Indian Society, Institutions and Change. Atlantic Publishers, New
Delhi.
5) Madhurima (2009), Readings in Sociology. Part- 1, New Academic Publishing Co.,
Jalandhar.
6) Pandey, J. (2002), Social Development. APH Publishers, New Delhi.
7) Rao, C.N. (2009), Sociology: Principles of Sociology, S.Chand Publishers, New Delhi.
8) Rao, C.N. (2009), Sociology of Indian Society. S.Chand Publishers, New Delhi.
9) Giddens, A. (2001), Sociology: A Textbook. PolityPress, London.
10) Haralambos, M.(1998), Sociology: Themes and Perspectives. Oxford University Press, New
Delhi.
31
8. GEOGRAPHY
BABED-GEOO11
PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (GEOMORPHOLOGY)
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of semester, the students will be able to:-
• describe the basic concepts and theories in physical geography.
• describe various movements ,land forms resulting from forces of compression and tension.
• explain origin , characteristics and various classification of rocks.
• explain concept of geomorphology and applied geomorphology and discuss their applications
to environmental hazards management.
Course Content
Unit-i
Geography: definition, place of physical geography within the discipline of geography,
divisions of physical geography-geomorphology, climatology, oceanography
Theories of the origin of the earth: Laplace, James, jeans and Jeffrey’s, and Otto Schmidt
Interior of the earth: constitution, theories on constitution -continental drift (with special
reference to Wegener’s theory and plate tectonics), isostasy
Unit-ii
Movements of the earth: orogenic epeirogenic movements, landforms resulting from forces of
compression and tension; mountain building theories (geosynclines, hinterland and foreland, median
mass, convection current), earthquakes and volcanoes (causes, types and distribution)
Unit-iii
Rocks -their origin, classification and characteristics
Major land forms: mountains, plateaus and plains in the world
Geomorphic agents: geomorphic processes (weathering and erosion)
Unit-iv
Geomorphologic landscapes: fluvial, glacial, aeolian, volcanic, coastal, karsts
Applied geomorphology: applications to transport, lailduse, environmental hazards
management etc.
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized sessional work which will
include:
• project report on land forms occur in India.
32
• seminar on effects of erosion.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 credits). There shall be 9 questions in all.
ii) The first question shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory.
It will consist of ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12
marks). In addition eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two
from each of four units of the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to
attempt one from each unit. (12x4 = 48 marks).
iii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 credit).
iv) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Singh, S. ( 1994), Physical Geography. Gyanodya Prakashan, Gorakhpur,
2) Strahler, A.N. & Strahler, A.H. (1987), Modern Physical Geography. John Wiley, New
York.
3) Dayal, P. (1995), A Text Book of Geomorphology. Shukla Book Depot, Patna.
4) Dury, G.H. (1973), The Face of the Earth. Penguin, Middlesex, England.
5) Kaur, D. (2000), The Earth. Edited by R.C. Chandtia, Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana.
6) Kale, V. & Gupta, A (2001), Elements of Geomorphology. Oxford University, Press,
Calcutta.
7) Singh, S. (2004), Geomorphology. Prayag Pustak Bhawan, Allahabad.
8) Sparks, B. W. (1986), Geomorphology. Longman, London.
9) Thornbury, W.D. (1993), Principles of Geomorphology. Second Edition, Wiley Eastern
Ltd.; New Delhi.
33
9. MATHEMATICS
BABED-MATO11
ALGEBRA & TRIGONOMETRY
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the students will be able to
• describe the concept of mappings, equivalence relations and partition.
• perform elementary operations on matrices; inverse of matrix.
• explain independence of row and column vectors, row rank, column rank and rank of
matrix.
• apply matrices to a system of homogenous and non-homogeneous equations.
• describe cayley hamilton theorem and its use in finding inverse of a matrix.
• describe and compute relations between the roots and co-efficients of general polynomial
equation in one variable and transform equations.
• discuss and apply descarl’s rule of signs.
• use cardon method to derive solutions of cubic equations and biquadratic equations.
• describe de moiver’s theorm and its applications.
• understand and apply gregouy’s seuies , summation of series.
• describe and use basic concepts of vectors algebra’s like transformation of axes , rotation
of axes invariants, identification of curves.
• draw using equation of the chord in terms of midpoint and diameter of a conic.
Unit I
Algebra
Mappings, equivalence relations and partitions, congruence modulo
Symmetric: skew symmetric. Hermitian and skew Hermitian matrices. Elementary operation
on matrices. Inverse of a matrix, linear independence of row and column vectors, row rank, column
rank and rank of a matrix. Equivalence of column and row ranks. Application of matrices to a system
of linear (homogenous and non- homogenous equations. Theorems on consistency of a system of
linear equations. Eigen values, Eigen vectors and the characteristic equation of a matrix. Cayley
Hamilton theorem and its use in finding inverse of a matrix
Unit II
Relations between the roots and coefficients of general polynomial equation in one variable.
Transformation of equations, Descartes rule of signs. Solutions of cubic equations (Cardon method).
Biquadratic equations
Unit III
Trigonometry
34
De Moivre’s theorem and its applications. Direct and inverse circular and hyperbolic functions.
Logarithm of a complex quantity, Expansion of trigonometrical functions Gregory’s series,
summation of series
Unit IV
Vector algebra
Transformation of axes, shifting of origin, rotation of axes, reduction of the second degree
equation into standard forms by transformation of co-ordinates. The invariants, identification of curves
represented by second degree equation (including pairs of lines)
Pole and polar, pair of tangents from a point, chord of contact, equation of the chord in terms
0f midpoint and diameter of a conic
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized sessional work like:
• teacher may familiarize the students with examples of Course content
• teacher will give extensive practice in the mathematical skills.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 credits). There shall be 9 questions in all.
ii) The first question shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory.
It will consist of ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12
marks). In addition eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two
from each of four units of the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to
attempt one from each unit. (12x4 = 48 marks).
iii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 credit).
iv) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Suggested Reading
1) Vasishta, A.R. (1972), Matrices. Krishna Prakashan Media (P) Ltd, Meerut
2) Mahindru, J.P., Gupta, U. & Dogra, A.S. (2004), New Pattern Vector Algebra Plane, Solid
and Geometry. International Publisher, Chandigarh.
3) Mahindru, J.P., Gupta, U. & Dogra, A.S. (2004), New Pattern Co-Ordinate Geometry.
International Publisher, Chandigarh.
4) Bhattacharya, P.B. Jain, S.K. & Nagpaul, S.R. (1983), First Course in Linear Algebra.
Wiley Eastern, New Delhi.
5) Hall, H.S. & Knight, S.R. (1994), Higher Algebra. H.M. Publications, New Delhi.
6) Verma, R.S. & Shukla, K.S. (2000), Text Book on Trigonometry. Allahabad.
35
GENERAL PRACTICUM
BABED-SRPC11
SCHOOL RELATED PRACTICUM
MARKS 100 (INTERNAL)
CREDITS 5
• Visit to education guarantee scheme (EGS) centre and evaluating its working to voluntarily
help the teacher in an education guarantee scheme EGS centre for at least one week.
• Each student will prepare time table for a given hypothetical situation (work load of teacher,
time of school functioning, infrastructure available, subjects to be offered etc) keeping
principles of time table construction in mind.
• The students will be provided opportunities to organize construct and design wall magazine
and morning assembly.
BABED-LSTC11
LIFE SKILLS TRAINING
MARKS 100 (INTERNAL)
CREDITS 5
Following two skills will be selected:
• Skill of creative thinking
• Skill of communication
For skill of creative thinking; Brain storming session and steps of creative problem solving will be
used by the teachers to orient the students and provoke them for creative expressions.
For skill of communication, the students will participate actively in giving presentations (subject
related), speak on various issues in morning assembly and express themselves effectively in the
class, in various activities of different papers. These will be supervised by the teacher educators of
the institution.
TUTORIALS
The students will be associated with one teacher, who will supervise individual progress on school
related practicum, improvement in life skills, sessional work of various subjects, general problems
related to academics and interaction among themselves etc. Also, the talent of individual students will
be explored and nurtured.
36
B.A. Hons. (Edu.) B.Ed.
SEMESTER–II ( Session 2011-12)
COURSE STRUCTURE FOR SEMESTER II
S.N. NATURE SUBJECT
CODE
SUBJECT TITLE LECTU
RE
TUTORI
AL
PRACTIC
AL
CREDI
TS
1 COMPULSO
RY
BABEDENGC21
ENGLISH 5 0 0 5
2 ONE OF
TWO
BABEDPBIC21
BABEDHCPC21
PUNJABI
HISTORY &
CULTURE OF
PUNJAB
5
5
0
0
0
0
5
5
3 &
4
TWO OF
NINE
BABEDECOO21
BABEDENGO21
BABEDGEOO21
BABEDHINO21
BABEDHISO21
BABEDMATO21
BABEDPOLO21
BABEDPBIO21
BABEDSOCO21
ECONOMICS
ENGLISH
GEOGRAPHY
HINDI
HISTORY
MATHS
POLITICAL
SCIENCE
PUNJABI
SOCIOLOGY
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5 &
6
COMPULSO
RY
BABEDEDUC03
PHILOSOPHICAL
&
SOCIOLOGICAL
FOUNDATIONS
OF EDUCATION
4
4
0
0
1
1
5
5
37
BABEDEDU04
PSYCHOLOGICA
L FOUNDATIONS
OF EDUCATION
7 COMPULSO
RY
BABEDSRPC21
SCHOOL
RELATED
PRACTICUM
2 0 3
(IN
FIELD)
5
8 COMPULSO
RY
BABEDLSTC21
LIFE SKILLS
TRAINING
4 0 1
(IN
LIBRARY)
5
GRAND TOTAL
40
PAPER I: BABED-EDU03: PHILOSOPHICAL AND SOCIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF
EDUCATION
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of semester, the students will able to:
• define the concept of education and give details of its parameters.
• identify the relationship between philosophy and education.
• identify the relationship between sociology and education.
• describe the philosophy of the educational thinkers, prescribed in the syllabus.
• identify the relationship of education with socio-cultural change, modernization and
social mobility.
Course Content:
Unit I Concept of education, meaning of education, Indian and western concept of
education, scope of education. Types of education – formal, in-formal and non
formal
Unit II Concept of philosophy, nature of philosophy, scope of philosophy, impact and its
relationship with education
Unit III Concept of sociology, scope, impact and its relationship with education
Unit IV Educational thinkers of India: Guru Nanak, Gandhi, Vivekananda and
Tagore; their philosophies and educational priorities
Unit V Education as a function of socio-cultural change: modernization and
social change, social mobility and their relationship with education
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized
sessional work which will include projects like:
1. Students will be divided into teams of 5-6 students. Each team will prepare sessional
38
papers on any one school with respect to socio-cultural belief of school. The criteria of
complete / comprehensive papers will be decided by the faculty. All the teams will be
evaluated by the concerned teacher.
2. They will visit an area where migratory population dominates that habitation and study the
relationship between education and social mobility.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
iv) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will be
required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3 Credits).
v) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers
and seminars (20 marks: 1 Credit).
vi) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interaction etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Bhatia, K.K. & Narang,C.L.(2003), Principles of Education (Methods and
Techniques). Tandon Publishers, Ludhiana.
2) Mathur,S.S.(1986), A Sociological Approach to Indian Education. Vinod Pustak
Mandir, Agra.
3) Joy, P. (1958), Selected Readings In The Philosophy of Education. The Macmillian
Company, New York.
4) Singh, R.P.(1993), Contemporary Indian Education Scene. The Indian
Publications, Ambala Cantt.
5) Taneja, V.R.(1973), Foundations of Education: Philosophical and Sociological.
Sterling Publications , New Delhi.
6) Walia, J.S.(2004), Principles of Education. Paul Publishers, Jalandhar.
7) Walia J.S. (2001), Principles and Methods of Education. Paul Publishers, Jalandhar
8) Harris, K. (1982), Education and Knowledge - The Structured Representation of
Reality. Routledge & Kagan Paul, London.
9) Dewey, J. (1961), Democracy and Education. The Macmillan Company, New York.
10) Thomson, G. (1961), A Modern Philosophy of Education. George Allen & Unwin Ltd,
London.
11) Connor,D.J.O (1957), An Introduction to Philosophy of Education. Routledge, London.
12) Martin & Oliver, W.H. (1969), Realism in Education, Harper Publishers. New York.
13) Illich, I. (1971), Deschooling Society. Harpers & Row, New York.
14) Sachchidananda (2005), School Community and the State. Serials Publications, New
Delhi.
15) Singh,R.P. (1993), Indian Education - Indepth Studies. Commonwealth Publishers,
New Delhi.
16) Chaube, S.P & Chaube, A.(2000), Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of
Education. Vinod Pustak Mandir, Agra.
PAPER II: BABED-EDU04: PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
39
Objectives
At the end of semester, the students will be able to:
• describe concept of educational psychology and explain its significance
• discuss the meaning of intelligence and its measurement.
• understand individual differences, their meaning, areas & role in individual
development.
• understand the nature and needs of exceptional children.
• understand the recent trends in the education of exceptional children.
Course Content
Unit I Educational psychology: nature and scope. Relationship of
Psychology with education – role of psychology in
Educational theory and educational practices
Unit II Intelligence- concept, meaning, nature and its measurement
Unit III Individual differences: meaning, areas of individual differences (cognitive
abilities, creativity, aptitude, achievement, learning styles, interest, attitudes,
values, level of aspiration, self concept, study habits, psychomotor skills etc) &
educational implications
Unit IV Exceptional children- concept, types of exceptional
children and their needs
Unit v Trends in the education of exceptional children: inclusive education,
mainstreaming, normalization, least restrictive environment,
deinstitutionalization
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized
sessional work which will include projects like:
1 Use of an intelligence test: understand the rationales of an intelligence test. Administer
it on a small group and write its interpretations.
2 Visit to institute for the blind and make a summary on problems and needs of these
exceptional children.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will be
required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3 Credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term
papers and assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1. Aggarwal, J.C. (1999), Elementary Educational Psychology. Doaba
House, Delhi.
40
2. Aggarwal, J.C. (2004) ,Essentials of Educational Psychology. Vikas
Publishing House,New Delhi.
3. Chauhan, S.S.(2004), Advanced Educational Psychology. Vikas
Publishing House, New Delhi.
4. Kulshreshtha, S.P. (1997), Educational Psychology. R Lall Book
Depot ,Meerut.
5. Mangal, S.K. (1992), Educational Psychology. Parkash Brothers,
Ludhiana.
6. Sharma, R.A. (2002),Fundamentals of Educational Psychology.
R.Lall Book Depot ,Meerut.
7. Gupta,V.K. (2003), Psychology of Learning and Development. Vinod
Publications, New Delhi.
8. Mathur, S.S.(1986), Educational Psychology. Vinod Pustak Mandir,
Agra.
9. Walia, J.S.(2008), Foundations of Educational Psychology. Paul
Publishers, Jalandhar.
10.Bigge,M.L. & Hunt, M.P.(1968), Psychological Foundations of
Education. 2nd Edition, Harper & Row, New York.
11. Mifflin, B.R.(1978), Psychology Applied to Teaching. Bosson,
Haughton.
12. Danion, W. (1983), Social and Personality Development : Infancy
Through Adolescence. Norton, New York.
13.Thomas,G. & Brodhy, J.E.(1977), Educational Psychology and
Realistics Approach. Holt, New York.
14.Cohen, A. & Cohen, C. (1986), Special Educational Needs in the
Ordinary Schools. Harper & Row Publishers, New York.
15. Cohen, A. & Cohen, C.(1986), Exceptional Children. Harper & Row
Publishers, New York.
16. Westhood, P.(1987), Common Sense Methods for Children with
Special Needs. Crown Helm Publishers, London.
17. Hilgard, E.R.,(1958), Introduction to Psychology. Harcourt, New
York.
18. Suri, S.P. & Sodhi, T.S. (2006), Psychological Foundations of
Education. Bawa Publications, Patiala.
PAPER III: BABED-ENGC21: ENGLISH COMPULSORY
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives of Teaching English
At the end of semester, the students will be able to :
• Make use of competence in all the four skills i.e. Listening , Speaking , Reading and
Writing.
• Describe and use new pedagogic practices in the teaching of both language and
literature.
41
• Describe implications of teaching/learning language through literature.
.
Course Content
Unit I
Poems 9 to 15 from the Text Slice of Life ed by Prof. Meera Malik, Published by
Publication Bureau, Panjab University, Chandigarh.
Unit II
Short stories 4, 5 from the Text Slice of Life ed by Prof. Meera Malik, published by
Publication Bureau, Panjab Univeristy, Chandigarh.
Unit III
Prose 3, 4 and 5 from the text slice of life ed by Prof. Meera Malik, published by
Publication Bureau, Panjab Univeristy, Chandigarh.
Unit IV
Determiners
Models
Non-Finites
Unit V
Comprehension of unseen passage
Prescribed text:
Slice of Life ed by Prof. Meera Malik, published by Publication Bureau, Panjab University,
Chandigarh.
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of internal
assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions, etc.
Evaluation Scheme
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions i.e. two questions from each unit with
internal choice. The students will be required to attempt one question from each of the five
units (80 marks: 4 Credits).
ii) Internal assessment will be based on terminal examinations, attendance,
classroom interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings:
1. Richards and Rodgers(2006), Approaches and Methods in Language
Teaching, Cambridge University Press, New York.
2. Gupta, A.& Sawhney (2008) Modern Essay, A.P.H. Publishing House, New
Delhi.
3. Satya, R.K.(2007), Modern Methods of Teaching English, APH Publishing
Corporation, New Delhi.
42
4. Sethi, M.(2008), Handbook of Standard English and Indian Usage: Vocabulary
and Grammer, PHI Learning Pvt Ltd, New Delhi.
5. William H.Hudson (2001), Outline History of English Literature, Atlantic
Publishers, New York.
6. Kleiser,Grenville(2008), Exploring English Grammar, APH Publishers, New
Delhi.
7. Sinha, B.B (2008), The Guide to English Usage, APH Publishers, New Delhi.
8. Bolton & Good (2009), English Grammar in Steps, Orientblack Swan,
Hyderabad.
9. Parashar, P.N.(2007), An Introduction to English Grammar, Commonwealth
Publishers, New Delhi.
PAPER IV: BABED-PBIC21: PUNJABI (COMPLUSORY)
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
• fJ; g/go dk wzst ejkDh s/ eftsk dhnK g[;seK dk fBeN nfXn?B eoBk j?.
• ftfdnkoEhnK B{z b/ye d/ ihtB s'A GKs ikD{ eotkT[Dk j?.
• gzikph ;kfjs ftZu b/yeK dh G{fweK pko/ ikDekoh d/Dk j?.
• ftnkeoD ftZu ôpdK d/ ftfGzB o{gK pko/ ;{M d/Dk j?. ;kfjs o{gK ns/
nbzekoK ;zpzXh ikDekoh d/Dk j?.
eEk ejkDh, ;zgkH vkH XBtzs e"o, gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gzikp
:{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ
2H w/oh ihtB rkEk, dhtkB f;zx, e;s{oh bkb n?Av ;B÷, nzfwqs;o
3H ejkDheko dk ihtB, ouBk ns/ :'rdkB
4H bx{ gqôB
5H ftnkeoD
:{fBN ns/ Ehw
UNIT - 1
eEk-ejkDh (fgSbhnK S/ ejkDhnK ftZu'A) ftZu'A fe;/ fJZe ejkDh dk ftôk
dZ; e/ ;ko (fszB ftZu'A fJZe) 16
UNIT – 2
w/oh ihtB rkEk ;t?-ihtBh ftZu'A fe;/ fJZe xNBk$eKv dk ;ko (fszB
ftZu'A fJZe)
16
UNIT – 3
43
fBoXkos ejkDhekoK ftZu'A fe;/ fJe dk ihtB, ouBk ns/ ;kfjse :'rdkB
(e[btzs f;zx ftoe, w'jB Gzvkoh, r[opõô f;zx gqhsbVh, ;[ytzs e"o wkB,
;[ikB f;zx) (fszB ftZu'A fJe) 16
UNIT - 4
w/oh ihtB rkEk ns/ eEk-ejkDh (fgSbhnK d/ gq;zr ftZu) bx{ gqôB T[Zso
(d; ftZu'A nZm)
2x8=16
UNIT - 5
(T) ;zy/g ouBk (gq?;h)
4
(n) nzro/ih s'A gzikph ftZu nB[tkd (;kfjse g?oQ/ d/ brGr 100 ôpd)
4
(J) ;{uBk fjs B'fN; fbyDk (;kfjse, ;fGnkukoe ns/ y/v y/so Bkb
;zpzfXs ekbi dhnK rshftXhnK pko/)
4
(;) w[jkto/ ns/ nykD 4
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form internal
assessment based on terminal examination, attendance, classroom interactions, etc. (20%).
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions i.e. two questions from each unit with
internal choice. The students will be required to attempt one question from each of the
five units (80 marks: 4 Credits).
ii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit)
Suggested Books:
1 ethnK dhnK eftsktK nbZr-nbZr ekft ;zrqfjnK ftZu'A bJhnK
ikDrhnK.
2 eEk p'X-;zgk okw ;o{g nDyh (2006), gpbhe/ôB fpT{o' uzvhrVQ
3 gzikph Gkôk fbgh ns/ ftnkeoB - vkH ôod/t f;zx frZb(2006) b'e
rhs gqekôB, b[fXnkDk.
4 gzikph nfXn?B s/ nfXnkgB d/ w[Yb/ ;zebg - ihs f;zx i'ôh(1999),
tko; ôkj ckT{Av/ôB nzfwqs;o
5 gzikph ;kfjs dh T[sgsh s/ ftek; - gofwzdo f;zx, feogkb f;zx
e;/b(1968), bkj"o p[Ze ôkg b[fXnkDk
6 nkX[fBe gzikph ;kfjs dh o{go/yk (1850 s'A 1970) - i'frzdo
f;zx(2002) gpbhe/ôB fpUo', gzikph :{Bh, gfNnkbk
7 gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; - (nkX[fBe ekb 1901 s'A 1995 sZe)-vka
i;ftzdo f;zx, vka wkB f;zx YhAv;k(1997), gpbhe/ôB fpU[o',
gzikph :{Bha gfNnkbk
8 nkX[fBe gzikph eftsk-gfotosB s/ gqftoshnK-vka G{fgzdo e"o
(2004), sob''uB gpfb;oi, uzvhrVQ.
9 nkX[fBe gzikph ekft XkoktK d/ ftukoXkokJh nkXko - vka eowihs
f;zx(1983), r[o{ BkBe d/t :{Bha nzfwqs;o
44
10 nkX[fBe gzikph eftsk dk ;[ji ôk;so-vka :'roki(1998), Gkosh-ro[g
nkc gpbhe/ôB, uzvhrVQ.
11 gzikph ftnkeoD-p{Nk f;zx prV, tko; ôkj ckT{Av/ôB, nzfwqs;o.
12 gqrshtkd-vkH ;[fozdo e[wko dt/ôto (2008), b'e rhs gqekôB,
b[fXnkDk.
PAPER IV: BABED-HCPC21: HISTORY AND CULTURE OF PUNJAB
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the students will be able to
• discuss the impact of Alexander invasion
• highlight the developments that occurred during the period of Mauryas, Kushnas,
Guptas, Pushyabhutis and Turkish invasion
Course Content
Unit-I
Alexander's invasion on Punjab
Impact of Alexander’s invasion on Punjab
Unit II
Social, economic and religious life in Punjab during Mauryas reign
Social and religious life in Punjab during Kushnas reign
Unit III
Social and cultural life in Punjab during Guptas reign
Punjab under the Pushyabhutis
Unit IV
Society and culture in Punjab on the eve of Turkish invasion
Development of art, Literature and education in Punjab (with special
reference to Taxila)
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of internal
assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions, etc. (20
%).
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
In all, nine questions will be set. Each question will carry 16 marks (80 marks: 4 Credits).
iii. First question shall be short answer type containing 12 short questions
spread over the whole syllabus. Candidates will attempt 8 out of the 12
45
questions in about 25 to 30 words each. It shall carry 16 marks and shall
be compulsory.
iv. Rest of the paper shall contain 4 units. Each unit shall have two essay
type questions and the candidate shall attempt one question from each
unit.
v. Each essay type question will be set on half of the topics and not on a
single sub-topic.
iv Internal Assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance,
classroom interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
2. Joshi, L.M.(1989), History and Culture of the Punjab. Part I, Publication Bureau,
Punjabi University, Patiala.
2. Joshi, L.M. and Singh, F.(1977), History and Culture of the Punjab.
Vol. I. Punjabi University, Patiala.
3. Prakash, B.(1983), Glimpses of Ancient Punjab. Panjabi University, Patiala.
4. Thapar, R. (1966), A History of India. Vol. I. Penguin Books, New Delhi.
5 . Basham, A.L.(1992), The Wonder That was India. Rupa Books, Calcutta
6. Sharma, B.N.(1966), Life in Northern India. Munshiram Manohar
Lal Publishers, NewDelhi.
7. Walia, J.M.(1992), A History of The Punjab, Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana,
OPTIONAL SUBJECTS - PAPER V and VI (100 Marks each)
The student is required to take up two elective/optional subjects from the following
nine subjects. Each subject will be of 100 marks.
1) English
2) Hindi
3) Punjabi
4) History
5) Political Science
6) Economics
7) Sociology
8) Geography
9) Mathematics
46
1. ENGLISH (ELECTIVE)
BABED-ENGO21
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of semester, the students will be able to:
• make use of competence in all the four skills i.e. listening, speaking , reading and
writing.
• describe implications of teaching/learning language through literature.
• develop the power of imagination through literature.
Unit I
Poem No. 12 – Up-Hill ( Christiana Rossetti )
Poem No. 13 – The Ballad of Earl Haldan’s Daughter ( Charles Kingsley)
Poem No. 14 – The Man He Killed ( Thomas Hardy )
Poem No. 15 – A Passer By ( Robert Seymour Bridges )
Poem No. 16 – Laugh and Be Merry ( John Masefield )
Poem No. 17 – Matilda ( Hilaire Belloc )
Poem No. 18 – Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening ( Robert Frost )
Poem No. 19 – The Vagabond ( John Drinkwater )
Poem No. 20 – Menelaus and Helen ( Rupert Brooke )
Poem No. 21 – The Ballad of Father Gilligan (W.B. Yeats )
From the book An Introduction to poetry by A.G. Xavier
Unit II
Story No. 7 – The Grief ( Chekhov )
Story No. 8 – How Much Land does a Man Need ( Leo Tolstoy )
Story No. 9 – A True Story ( Mark Twain )
Story No. 10 – Blow up with the Ship ( Wilkie Collins )
Story No. 11 – My Uncle Jules ( Guy De Maupassant )
Story No. 12 - The Mother ( Somerest Maugham )
From the book Twelve Short Stories by C.M. Sharma
Unit III
Drama No 4 – Mother’s Day ( J.B. Priestley )
Drama No 5 - The Dumb Wife of Cheapside ( Ashley Dukes )
47
Drama No 6 – Trifles ( Susan Glaspell )
From the book Before the Footlights by R.M. Sharma ,B.N. Sethi and N.C. Uday
Unit IV
Letter writing (Personal/ Social)
Applied Grammar: Articles, Prepositions, Conjunctions
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations by the teacher. The remaining will be covered in the form of
individualized work comprising of a project on:
• preparing a report on writings of any writer mentioned in course content..
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper at the end of the session will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits). The syllabus
has been divided into four units. There shall be 9 questions in all. The first question shall be
short answer type containing 10 questions and each to be answered in about 25 to 30 words.
The candidate is required to attempt any 6 short answer type questions i.e. 2 marks each
selecting atleast one question on each author. It shall carry 12 marks and shall be
Compulsory question. Rest of the paper shall contain 4 units. Each unit shall have two
questions and the candidates shall be given internal choice i.e. the candidates shall attempt
one question from each Unit -4 questions in all. Each question carries 12 marks
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings:
6. Tickoo, M.L. & Subramaniaum, A.E.(1997), Living English Grammar and Composition.
Orient Longman Ltd, Mumbai.
7. Sethi, M. (2008), Handbook of Standard English and Indian Usage: Vocabulary and
Grammer. PHI Learning Pvt Ltd, New Delhi.
8. Xavier, A.G. (2004), An Introduction to Poetry. MacMillan Publishers, New Dehli.
9. Sharma, C.M. (2005), 12 Short Stories. Oxford University Press. New Dehli.
10. Sharma, R.M., Sethi, B.L. & Uday, N.C. (2008), Before the Footlights. Panjab
University Publication Bureau, Chandigarh.
48
2. HINDI (ELECTIVE)
BABED-HINO21
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
vè;;u izfØ;k ds lekiu ds mijkUr fo|kFkhZ &
• miU;kl dh ifjHkk"kk] rRo vkSj oxhZdj’k djsaxs A
• dgkuh dh ifjHkk"kk] rRo vkSj oxhZdj’k ds lEcfU/r nks iz'uksa dk mÙkj fy[ksaxs A
• >kalh dh jkuh ds lanHkZ esa mlds uked’kZ] dFkkoLrq pfj=k] mn~ns'; ds vk/kj ij leh{kk
djsaxs A
• O;ogkfjd O;kdj’k esa ls fn, x, iz'uksa dk mÙkj fy[ksaxs A
• fn, x, eqgkojs o yksdksfDr;ka dk iz;ksx djasxs A
• fu/kZfjr fo"k; ij vuqPNsn ys[ku djsaxs A
• futh i=k ys[ku dh fof/ dk iz;ksx djus gsrq ,d futh i=k fy[ksaxs A
• ifjHkkf"kd 'kCnkoyh dk iz;ksx djsaxs A
Course Content
Unit I
leh{kk fl¼kUr
(dsoy miU;kl vkSj dgkuh)
(d) miU;kl dh ifjHkk"kk] rÙo vkSj oxhZdj.k lEcU/h nks iz'u iwNs tk,¡xsA 10 vadksa
dk dsoy ,d iz'u djuk gksxkA
([k) dgkuh dh ifjHkk"kk] rRo vkSj oxhZdj.k lEcU/h nks iz'u iwNs tk,¡xsA 10 vadksa
dk dsoy ,d iz'u djuk gksxkA
Unit II
>kalh dh jkuh&o`Unkou yky oekZ & e;wj izdk'ku] >kalh
ukedj.k] dFkkoLrq] pfj=k] mís'; ds vk/kj ij pkj leh{kkRed iz'u iwNs tk;saxs] ftuesa ls
10&10 vadksa ds dksbZ nks iz'u djus gksaxsA bl [k.M esa lanHkZ lfgr O;k[;k ugha
iwNh tk;sxhA
Unit III
O;kogkfjd O;kdj.k
(d) foijhrkFkZd 'kCn
49
([k) lekukFkZd 'kCn
(x) 'kCn 'kks/u vkSj okD; 'kks/u
(?k) okD;ka'k ds fy, ,d 'kCn
( ) eqgkojs vkSj yksdksfDr;ka
Unit IV
fu/kZfjr fo"k; ij vuqPNsn&ys[ku
futh i=k&ys[ku
ifjHkkf"kd 'kCnkoyh
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized
sessional work.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
v) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist
of ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In
addition eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of
four units of the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from
each unit. (12x4 = 48 marks).
vi) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
vii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Project
3- fgUnh dh fdlh ,d iqLrd dh leh{kk A
4- Nkyksa dh fgUnh Hkk"kk lh[kus lacfU/r dfBukbZ;k¡ vkSj leL;kvksa dk vè;;uA
Suggested Reading
1- fnf{kr HkkxhjFk (2003)] leh{kkyksd] bUnzizLFk izdk'ku] fnYyhA
2- tSu fueZyk (2006)] ubZ leh{kk ds izfreku] us'kuy ifCyf'kax gkml] fnYyhA
3- prqosZnh jkts'oj izlkj (2008) fgUnh O;kdj.k] midkj izdk'ku] vkxjkA
4- lkguh ,l- ch- 'kekZ vkj- ih- (2007) loksZÙke fgUnh O;kdj.k] lkguh izdk'ku] vkxjkA
5- o`Unkou yky oekZ (1995), >kalh dh jkuh e;wj izdk'ku] >kalh
6. uxsUnz gjn;ky (2009) fgUnh lkfgR; dk bfrgkl] e;wj isijcSDl] uks;M+kA
7- jktkjke dYiuk (2009) fuca/ cks/] LisDVªe cqDl izk- fy-] fnYyhA
50
3. PUNJABI (ELECTIVE)
BABED-PBIO21
gzikph nb?efNt
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
• fJ; g/go dk wzst ftfdnkoEhnK dh fJeKrh ;zpzXh ikDekoh B{z j'o ft;Eko
d/Dk j?.
• Bktb okj] gzikp d/ g/Av ;fGnkuko s'A ikD{ eotkT[Dk j?.
• gzikph ;kfjs d/ fJfsjk; ftZu ftfdnoEhnK dh fdbu;gh g?dk eoBk j?.
• Bktb d/ fJfsjk; pko/ v{zxh ikDekoh d/Dk j?.
gkmeqw
1H s{sK tkbk y{j, ;'jD f;zx ;hsb, bkj"o p[Ze ôkg, b[fXnkDk
2H S/ doôB, ;zs f;zx ;/y'A, gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh,
uzvhrVQ
3H bx{ gqôB
4H Gkôk s/ ;kfjs
5H nbzeko
:{fBN ns/ Ehw
UNIT - 1
s{sK tkbk y{j Bktb d/ nkXko s/ d'tK ftu'A e'Jh fJZe gqôB eo'.
(i) ftôk t;s{
(ii) gbkN
(iii) gkso fusoD 15
UNIT - 2
(T) S/ doôB fJeKrh ;zrqfj ftZu'A (fgSbhnK fszB fJeKrhnK) fJeKrh dk
;ko (d' ftZu'A fJe)
7
(n) Bktb ns/ fJeKrhnK ftZu'A bx{ gqôB (S/ ftZu'A uko)
8
UNIT - 3
Gkôk s/ ;kfjs d/ nkXko s/ d'tK ftu'A e'Jh fJZe gqôB eo'.
(i) ;kfjs dh gfoGkôk, gqfeosh ns/ gq:'iB
51
(ii) Gkôk dh gfoGkôk, gqfeosh ns/ gq:'iB 15
UNIT - 4
nbzeko d/ nkXko s/ fszBK ftu'A fJe eo' .
(i) T[gwk
(ii) nfseEBh
(iii) nB[gqk;
(iv) fdqôNKs 15
Teaching Learning Exercises
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized
sessional work.
Project Work
• ;'jD f;zx ;hsb dk gzikph Bktb ftu ;EkB
S/ fJeKrh (fgSbhnK fszB fJeKrhnK ftu'A) g[;se d/ nkXko s/ fe;/ fJe
fJeKrheko d/ ihtB ns/ ouBk pko/ fby'.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
iv) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 Credits)
v) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
vi) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Books:
i gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; 1700 JhH sZe(2003), gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh,
uzvhrVQ
ii gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; 1700 JhH se(1972), gzikph :{Bhtof;Nh,
gfNnkbk
iii gzikph ;kfjs dh T[sgsh s/ ftek;, gofwzdo f;zx s/ feogkb f;zx
e;/b(1968), bkj"o p[Ze ôkg, b[fXnkDk.
iv ôpd ;t/ok (;zgkH vkH jfoGiB f;zx)(2007) gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gzikp
:{Bhtof;Nh uzvhrVQ
v nZX ukBDh oks - r[ofdnkb f;zx(1972), fjzd gkfeN p[e; gqkJht/N
fbwfNv, fdZbh
vi gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; - vkH jfoGiB f;zx (1972), Gkôk ftGkr
gzikp, gfNnkbk.
vii Bktb ôk;so s/ gzikph Bktb-vkH ;[fozdo e[wko dt/ôto
viii gzikph Bktb-vkH i'frzdo f;zx okjh(2000) BkBe f;zx g[;sewkbk,
nzfwqs;o.
ix nkU Bktb gVQhJ/- vkH Nh nkoH ftB'd(2002) u/sBk gqekôB,
b[fXnkDk.
x wXekbh gzikph ;kfjs ftt/eL- vkH nwoihs f;zx eKr, vkH i;gkb e"o
eKr, BkBe f;zx g[;sewkbk, nzfwqs;o.
52
xi ôkj j[;?B- jofizdo f;zx fYb'A, tko; ôkj ckT{Av/ôB, nzfwqs;o.
4. HISTORY
BABED-HISO21
HISTORY OF INDIA 1200-1750 A.D.
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives:
At the end of the semester, the students will be able to:
• discuss the important phases of Indian history with the beginning of Turkish invasion which had
tremendous influence in Indian society and polity.
• discuss the politics and establishment of new forms of political institution from the period 1200 to
1750 A.D.
• explain in detail study the rise of new languages, religious beliefs and social custom.
• highlight main trends in Indian history prior to the advent of the British power.
Course content
Unit-I
1) Establishment and Consolidation of the Delhi Sultanate: The conquests of Muizuddin
of Ghor and their impact; the consolidation of Turkish rule under Iltutmish and Balban
2) The Khaljis: The Conquests of Alauddin Khillji; his administrative, agrarian and market
reforms
3) The Tughluqs: Muhammad bin Tughluq's administrative experiments and their
impact; Feroze Shah Tughluq's administrative and economic reforms and their
consequences
Unit-II
1) The Vijaynagar Kingdom: Establishment and expansion; administration and economy
2) Foundation of Mughal Empire: Political conditions of India on the eve of Babur's invasion;
conquests of Babur; causes of his success
3) The Afghans: Establishment of second Afghan empire under Sher Shah Suri and his
administrative reforms
Unit-III
1) The Mughal Empire under Akbar: His relations with the chiefs of Rajputana; his
religious policy; his civil administration
53
2) The Reigns of Jahangir and Shahjahan: The influence of Nurjahart on Mughal politics;
the Deccan policies of Jahangir and Shahjahan
3) The Decline of Mughal Empire: Causes responsible for the decline; responsibility of
Aurangzeb
Unit-IV
1) The Rise of the Marathas: Shivaji and his administration
2) Bhakti Movement: Causes responsible for the rise of Bhakti movement; main
features; prominent Bhakti saints
3) Map:
a) Important Historical Places-Lahore, Delhi, Agra, Mathura, Fatehpur Sikri,
Chittor, Jaipur, Udaipur, Panipat, Lucknow, Ahmednagar, Poona, Surat,
Golkunda, Bijapur, Daultabad
b) The empire of Alauddin Khalji
c) The Mughal Empire under Aurangzeb
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized
sessional work which will include:
1) prepare a project report on one historical place situated in Delhi ,Agra, or Jaipur etc
and explore importance of the place and trends of changes beyond specified periods
2) Identification of important and prominent Bhakti Saints of the region and sketch life
history and important preaching’s of those saints.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
v) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question shall
be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of ten
short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four
units of the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each
unit. (12x4 = 48 marks).
vi) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
vii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
19. Basham, A.L.(1992), The Wonder That was India. Rupa Books, Calcutta.
20. Sharma, B.N.(1966),Life in Northern India. Munshiram Manohar Lal Publishers, Delhi.
21. Thapar, R. (1966), A History of India. Vol I , Penguin Books, New Delhi.
22. Chandra, S. (2009), History of Medieval India. Orientblack Swan Publishers,
Hyderabad.
23. Naravane, M.S. (2008), Battles of Medieval India (A.D 1295-1850). APH Publishers,
New Delhi.
24. Murthy, K.S. (2008), Medieval Indian Culture and Political Geography. APH
Publishers, New Delhi.
54
25. Chandel, L.S. (1989), Early Medieval State- study of Delhi Sultanate. Commonwealth
Publisher, New Delhi.
26. Chand, D.P. & Rajshree, S. (2006), Landmarks in Indian History 1 (Ancient &
Medieval). Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana.
27. Seshan, R. (2006), Medieval India: Problems and Possibilities. Rawat Publication,
Jaipur.
28. Chaurasia, R.S.(2002), History of Medieval Indian: from 1000A.D to 1707 A.D. Atlantic
Publishers, New Delhi.
29. Keene, H.G. (2000), The Fall of The Moghul Empire. Atlantic Publishers, New Delhi.
30. Habib, I. (1998), Medieval India-1. Oxford University Press, London.
31. Nath, R. (2008), Medieval Indian History and Architecture. APH Publishers, New
Delhi.
32. Chattopadhyaya, D.P. & Grewal, J.S.(2006), Religious Movements and Institutions in
Medieval India. Oxford University Press, London.
33. Bakshi, S.R.& Sharma, S.K.(2008), Maratha Diplomacy and Foreign Policy. Deep &
Deep Publications, New Delhi.
34. Khanna, M. (2009), Cultural History of Medieval India. Orient Black Swan, Hyderabad.
35. Malleson, G.B.(2006), Akbar & The Rise of The Mughal Empire. Rupa & Co., New
Delhi.
36. Jayapalan, N.(2007), History of India. Vol. 2, Atlantic Publishers, New Delhi.
5. POLITICAL SCIENCE
BABED-POLO21
POLITICAL THEORY-II
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the students will be able to:
• describe and differentiate the meaning and features of the concept of power, authority
and legitimacy;
• explain the meaning, characteristics and significance of the term political culture;
• discuss the meaning of political socialization, its relevance and different agents of
political socialization;
• analyze the interrelationship between political culture and political socialization;
• understand the concept of rights and duties of education;
• know the human rights , meaning, significance of universal declaration of human
rights .
• describe the significance of environmental education and its protection;
• differentiate the concept of liberty, equality and justice, their kinds and their
significance to the civic society and explain how three of these are complimentary to
each other;
• describe the concept, theories and types of democracy and how it can be made more
practical.
55
Course Content
Unit-I
Power, authority, legitimacy: meaning and characteristics
Political culture: meaning, characteristics and types
Political socialization: meaning, characteristics and agencies; role of education in political
socialization
Unit-II
Rights and duties: meaning, types and relation between the two; essentials of education
for practicing rights and duties
Universal declaration of human rights
Environmental education and its protection: issues and decision making
Unit-III
Liberty: meaning, types of its safeguards
Equality: meaning, types and relationship between liberty and equality
Justice: meaning and its various dimensions
Unit-IV
Democracy: meaning, characteristics and types, education for strengthening democracy.
Theories of democracy: Liberal, Marxian and Elitist
Democracy and local self government
Political issues: main features of democratic system in reference to direct and indirect
democracy
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized
sessional work which will include:
• poster making on the environment protection and education.
• making bibliography on any of the topics in the syllabus with minimum 20 books.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
v) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question shall
be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of ten
short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four
units of the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each
unit. (12x4 = 48 marks).
vi) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
vii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
56
Sugessted Reading
1. Johri,J.C. (1979), Principles of Political Science. Sterling Publishers, New
Delhi.
2. Verma, S.P.(1974), Political Theory. Geetanjali Publishing House, New Delhi.
3. Kapoor, A.C.(1950), Principles of Political Science. S. Charld & Company, New
Delhi.
4. Ashirvatham, E.(1985), Political Theory. S. Chand &. Company, New Delhi.
5. Jain, M.P.(1985), Political Theory. Authors Guild Publication. Delhi (Punjabi &
Hindi).
6. Easton, D.(1960), The Political System. Scientific Book Agency, Calcutta.
7. Bhattacharya, D.C.(1981), Political Theory. Vijay Publishing House, Calcutta.
8. Gauba, O.P.(2005), An introduction to Political Theory. Macmillan India Ltd.,
New Delhi.
9. Macphesson, C.B.(1979), Democratic Theory. Oxford Press, London .
10. Badyal, J.S.(2007), Political Theory. Raj Publishers,Jalandhar.
6. ECONOMICS
BABED-ECOO21
INDIAN ECONOMY
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the students will be able to
• describe the concept and features of Indian economy.
• analyze the pros and cons of Indian agriculture.
• discuss and differentiate financial system, tax structure , direction and composition of
trade since independence.
• judge the achievement and features of Indian five year plans and understand various
economic problems like inflation , unemployment.
Course Content
Unit-I
Features and characteristics of Indian economy: agriculture: importance of agriculture;
causes of backwardness and low productivity; new agricultural strategy, green revolution and
critical evaluation with special reference to environmental degradation; land reforms: need,
implementation and critical evaluation; WTO and Indian agriculture
Unit-ii
Industry: problems of industrial development; public and private sector; industrial
policy since 1956 with special emphasis on recent trends of liberalization; role and problems
of small and large scale industries. Role and scope of it industry in India
Unit-iii
Principal features of Indian tax structure. Division of financial resources between
centre and the states. Recommendation of the 12th finance commission direction and
57
composition of exports and imports and changes therein since independence; balance of
payment problem; role of MNCs in India
Unit-iv
Planning: objectives, strategy and achievements of Indian planning; critical evaluation
of the latest five year plan (plan wise details to be excluded); major economic problems:
inflation, unemployment, poverty and population growth. Introduction to consumer education
and consumer protection act (elementary ideas)
Teaching Learning Experience
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized
sessional work.
1 In teams students will survey unemployment among youth of a specified
area at various levels
2 In teams students will identify concentration of various small scale industries in and
around Chandigarh
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
v) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 Credit) and 9 questions in all. The first question shall
be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of ten
short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four
units of the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from
each unit. (12x4 = 48 marks).
vi) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
vii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1. Datt, R. & Sundram, K.P.M. (2007), Indian Economy. S. Chand & Co. (Latest
Edition).
2. Soni, R.N.(2008), Leading Issues in Agriculture Economics. Sohan Lal Nagin Chand &
Sons, New Delhi.
3. Dhar, P.K. (1999), Indian Economy. Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana
4. Gill,J.S.(2004), Evolution of Indian Economy. NCERT, New Delhi.
5. Aggarwal, A.N. (2005), Indian Economy. Wiley Eastern Ltd, New Delhi.
6. Ghosh, A. (Trans. Singh, A.N.)(2004), Bhartiy Arth Vivstha. Punjabi
University, Patiala.
7. Singh, C.G. (2005), Bharti Arth Shastar. Punjabi University, Patiala.
8. Misra, S.K. & Puri, V.K. (2006), Indian Economy. Himalya Publishing House,
Mumbai.
9. Tandon, B. & Tandon, K.K.(1998), Indian Economy. Tata McGraw Hills Pub.
Co., New Delhi.
10.Jalan, B.(2008), India's Economy in the New Millennium. UBS Publishers,
New Delhi.
58
11.Reddy, Y.V. (2008), Economic Policy in India: Managing Change. UBS
Publishers, New Delhi.
12. Bajpai, P & Bhandari, L.(2009), Social and Economic Profile of India.
Orientblack Swan, Hyderabad.
13. Vasudeva, P.K.(2009), India & World Trade Organisation: Planning and
Development. APH Publishers, New Delhi.
14. Singh, B. N. (2008), Economic Reforms in India. APH Publishers, New
Delhi.
15. Gupta, K.R. & Gupta, J.R.(2009), Indian Economy. Atlantic Publishers, New
Delhi.
16. Singh, B.N.P. (2008), Indian Economy Today : Changing Contours. Deep &
Deep Publications, New Delhi.
17. Sen, R.K. & Chatterjee, B. (2008), Indian Economy. (Agenda for the 21st
Century). Deep & Deep Publications, New Delhi.
7. SOCIOLOGY
BABED-SOCO21
SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the students shall be able to:
• describe the concept of Social Institutions , which are foundations of human society.
• describe various Institutions at society in objective and intrinsic way.
• highlight characteristic features of social institutions like Marriage, Family and Kinship.
• describe some Political and Cultural and Economic Institutions , their meaning ,
features and functions.
Course Content
Unit-I
Institutions-meaning, features
Types-social, political, economic and cultural
Normative and relational aspect of institutions
Unit-II
Social institutions
Marriage - types: monogamy and polygamy; rules of mate selection, changing trends.
Family - meaning, types (joint, nuclear), function, changing trends
Kinship - meaning, significance and a brief understanding of incest
59
Unit-III
Political institutions – meaning, types (monarchy, democracy, totalitarianism,
dictatorship) and functions
Economic institutions – meaning, features and functions
Unit-IV
Cultural institutions -- religion-meaning, types, functions
Educational institutions – meaning, types (formal, informal, non formal)
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized
sessional work which will include:
i) preparation of family tree
ii) quiz on educational institutions
iii) seminar on “Quality of Good Teacher” Or “Teacher Student Interaction"
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
v) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist
of ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In
addition eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of
four units of the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from
each unit. (12x4 = 48 marks).
vi) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
vii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
9) Christensen, H. (1964), Handbook of Marriage & Family. Ailyn and Bacon, Delhi.
10) Fox, R. (1967), Kinship and Marriage: Anthropological Perspective. Baltimore:
Penguin Books.
11) Giddens, A. (2001), Sociology: A Textbook. PolityPress, London.
12) Haralambos, M.(1998), Sociology: Themes and perspectives. Oxford University
Press, New Delhi.
13) Johnson, H.M. (1980), Sociology: A Systematic Introduction. Allied Publishers,
Delhi.
14) Macionis, J.J. (2005), Society: The Basics, Prentice Hall. New York.
15) Aron, R. (1967), Main Currents in Sociological Thought. Vols. I & II, Penguin, New
York.
16) Durkhiem, E. (1960), The Division of Labour in Society. Illinois: Free Press of
Glenocoe.
17) Jones, M.W.H. (1971), The Government and Politics of India. Hutchinson
University Press, London.
18) Patel, T. (2005), Family in India: Structure and Practice. Sage, New Delhi.
60
19) Parelins, A.R.(1978), The Sociology of Education. Prentice Hall, New Jersey.
20) Sharma, R.K. (2008), Indian Society, Institutions and Change. Atlantic Publishers,
New Delhi.
21) Jayapalan, N.(2007), Indian Society and Social Institutions. Atlantic Publishers,
New Delhi.
22) Uberoi, P. (1997), Family, Kinship, and Marriage in India. Oxford University Press,
London.
23) Ray, R. & Katzenstein, M.F. (2006), Social Movements in India: Poverty, Power,
and Politics. Oxford University Press, London.
24) Sisodia, Y. S. (2008), India's Social, Economic and Political Development. Rawat
Publications, Jaipur.
25) Kar, P.K (1998), Indian Society. Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi.
26) Reddy, S.P.& Gangadhar, V.(2002), Indian Society - Continuity Change and
Development. Commonwealth Publishers, New Delhi.
27) Madhurima (2009), Readings in Sociology. Part- 1, New Academic Publishing Co.,
Jalandhar.
28) Pandey, J. (2002), Social Development. APH Publishers, New Delhi.
21) Rao, C.N. (2009), Sociology: Principles of Sociology. S.Chand Publishers, New
Delhi.
22) Rao, C.N. (2009), Sociology of Indian Society. S.Chand Publishers, New Delhi.
8. GEOGRAPHY
BABED-GEOO21
PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (CLIMATOLOGY & OCEANOGRAPHY)
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the students will be able to :
• define climatology and discriminate climate and weather.
• describe physical structure of the atmosphere and highlight attributes of each division
of atmosphere.
• discuss meaning and distribution and its types of Insolation.
• discuss various types of atmosphere distribution like tropical cyclones , temperate
cyclones and anticyclones.
• enumerate and describe characteristics of each of the forms of condensations ,
precipitation forms .
• describe bases of various classifications of climate.
• define concept of oceonology , explain its features and factors controlling world
patterns of distributions of temperature and salinity.
• describe movements of oceanic waters , and explain characteristics features of waves
and currents.
• describe types of marine flora , fauna and deposits and give reasons how these may
be used as storehouse of resources for the future.
61
Course Content
Unit-I
Definition of climatology: climate and weather
Climate: elements and. controls
Physical structure of the atmosphere: troposphere, tropopause and stratosphere and
attributes of these three divisions
Physical and chemical composition of the atmosphere: dust particles, vapour particles,
active gases, inert gases
Insolation and temperature: horizontal distribution of insolation, vertical and horizontal
and annual, seasonal and diurnal distributions of temperature
Unit-II
Atmospheric pressure and winds distribution: atmospheric disturbances (tropical
cyclones, temperate cyclones and anticyclones)
Atmospheric moisture: forms of condensation-cloud, dew, fog, frost and snow.
precipitation forms and types, world patterns of precipitation : spatial and seasonal
Climatic classifications and their bases: elementary discussion of koppen's
classification of climates and climatic type
Role of climate in human life: atmospheric pollution and global warming -general
causes, consequences and measures of control
Unit-III
Oceanography: definition, topography of the ocean basins; continental shelf,
continental slope, deep sea plain and oceanic deep. features: trench, trough, oceanic ridge,
guyots, seamount
Factors controlling the world patterns of distribution of temperature and salinity in the
ocean waters
Unit-IV
Movements of oceanic waters: waves and currents. surface currents of the oceans
Marine flora, fauna and deposits, corals
Oceans as storehouse of resources for the future
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized
sessional work.
1 The teacher will assign to record temperature in the locality of the students for one
week and report the implications of this recording. In case it is possible, short field
trips may be organized.
2 The teacher will assign collection of Flora, Fauna and Deposits from the respective
area of habitation of students.
3 Throughout the course, conscious effort will be made to make the students aware of
the significance of climate to human life. Slides, photographs, documentaries' on
oceans may be used to illustrate the various aspects of oceanography.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
v) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 Credit) and 9 questions in all. The first question shall
be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of ten
short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four
62
units of the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each
unit. (12x4 = 48 marks).
vi) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
vii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Sugessted Readings
1. Critchfield, H.J.(1975), General Climatology. Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd., New
Delhi.
2. Lal, D.S.(1989), Climatology. Chaitanya Publishing House, AIlahabad.
3. Trewartha, G.T.(1980), An Introduction to Climate. McGraw Hill Book Co., New
Delhi.
4. Khan, N.(2001), An Introduction to Physical Geography. Concept Publishers, New
Delhi.
5. Shanna, R.C. and Vatel, M.(2005), Oceanography for Geographers. Chetnya
Publishers, Allahabad.
6 Singh, S. (2004), Climatology. Prayag Pustak Bhavan, Allahabad.
7. Bhutani, S. (2000), Our Atmosphere. Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi.
8. Gross, G. M.(1975), Oceanography: A View of the Earth. Prentice Hall,
New Jersey.
9. Mathew, J.R.(2004), Climatology. McGraw Hill, New York.
10. Monkhouse, F.J.(1959), The Principles of Physical Geography. University
of London Press, London.
11. Pattersen, S.(2000), Introduction to Meteorology. McGraw Hill Book Co.,
London.
12. Stringer, E. T.(1982), Foundations of Climatology. Surjeet Publications,
New Delhi.
13. Markandey, D.K.(2006), Our Environment. APH Publishers, New Delhi.
14. Chopra, G..(2006), Coastal and Marine Geography. Commonwealth
Publishers, New Delhi.
15. Chandna, R.C.(1998), Environmental Geography. Kalyani Publishers, New
Delhi.
16. Alkazi, Feisal(2008), Exploring an Environment. Orientblack Swan,
Hyderabad.
17. Mathur, A. (2000), Elements of Geology. PHI Publishers, New Delhi.
18. Gupta, K.R (2005), Environment: Problems and Policies. Atlantic Publishers,
New Delhi.
19. Datta, A.K.(2005), Introduction of Physical Geology. Kalyani Publishers, New
Delhi.
9. MATHEMATICS
BABED-MATO21
CALCULUS
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
63
At the end of the semester, the students should be able to
• describe concept of differential calculus like e-s definition of limit of function ,
continuity of functions and classifications of discontinuities.
• understand and apply the rule of successive differentiation.
• use leibnitz theorem.
• trace curves for cartesian and parameter coordinates.
• use reduction for values of integral calculus like definite integral, surface of solids of
revolutions.
• compute ordinary differential equations ; first order and higher degree equations
solvable x.y.p
• describe assumptions , properties and use of compute conjugate diameter hyperbola.
• solbe pollar equations conics and chords.
• describe concepts of central conicides , paraboloids and conicoid.
UNIT-I
Differential calculus
E-S definition of the limit of a function, basic properties of limits, continuous functions and
classification of discontinuities. Successive differentiation, Leibnitz theorem, indeterminate
forms, asymptotes curvature, tests for concavity and convexity, points of inflexion, multiple
points, tracing of curves. (Cartesian and parametric coordinates only)
Unit-II
Integral calculus reduction formulae: definite integrals. Quadrature and rectifications volumes
and surfaces of solids of revolution
Unit-III
Ordinary differential equations
Exact differential equations, first order higher degree equations solvable for x.y.p.
cliaraut’s form and singular solutions, geometrical meaning of a different equation, orthogonal
trajectories linear differential equations with constant coefficients, homogeneous linear
ordinary differential equations
Linear differential equations of second order, transformation of the equation by
changing the dependent variable/ the independent variable, method of variations of
parameters
Unit IV
Geometry
Conjugate diameters, conjugate hyperbola, asymptotes of a hyperbola and
rectangular, special properties of parabola, ellipse and hyperbola. Pollar equations of conics
and equations of chords, tangents and normal’s only
sphere, cone, cylinder
Central conicoides, paraboloids plane sections of conicoids, generating lines,
reduction of second degree equations to standard forms
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized
sessional work like:
• teacher may familiarize the students with examples of course content, teacher will give
extensive practice in the mathematical skills.
64
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
v) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question shall
be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of ten
short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four
units of the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each
unit. (12x4 = 48 marks).
vi) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
vii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings:
1) Jain, P.K. & Kaushik, S.K. (2000), An Introduction to Real Analysis. S.Chand &
Co.New Delhi.
2) Prasad, G. (2004), Differential Calculus. Pothishala Pvt. Ltd. Allahabad.
3) Prasad, G. (2002), Integral Calculus. Pothishala Pvt. Ltd. Allahabad.
4) Muray, D.A. (1967), Introductory course in Differential Equations. Orient Longman
(India)
5) Kreyszig, E. (1999), Advanced Engineering Mathematics. John Wiley and Sons, New
York.
6) Murray, R.S. (1967), Theory and Problems of Advanced Calculus. Schaum Publishing
Co, New York.
7) Acharya, B.P. & Das R.N. (1998), Fundamentals of Differential Geometry. Kalyani
Publishers, New Delhi.
8) Shanker, A.G. (1994), Numerical Integration of Differential Equations. Deep & Deep
Publications, New Delhi.
9) Widder, F.(2008), Advanced Calculus. PHI Pvt Ltd, New Delhi.
10) Gupta, S. (2006), Calculus of Variations with Applications. PHI Pvt Ltd, New Delhi.
11) Kishan, H. (2007), Vector Algebra and Calculus. Atlantic Publishers, New Delhi.
12) Kishan, H. (2007), Integral Calculus. Atlantic Publishers. New Delhi.
ONLY IN SEMESTER II
ENVIRONMENT EDUCATION (COMPULSORY)
Marks: 50
Credits: 2.5
1) Environment concept: introduction, concept of biosphere-lithosphere, hydrosphere,
atmosphere; natural resources-their need and types; principles and scope of ecology;
concepts of ecosystem, population, community, biotic interactions, biomes, ecological
succession
2) Atmosphere: parts of atmosphere, components of air; pollution, pollutants, their
sources, permissible limits, risks and possible control measures
3) Hydrosphere: types of aquatic systems; major sources (including ground water) and
uses of water, problems of the hydrosphere, fresh water shortage; pollution and
pollutants of water, permissible limits, risks and possible control measures
4) Lithosphere: earth crust, soil-a life support system, its texture, types, components,
pollution and pollutants, reasons of soil erosion and possible control measures
65
5) Forests: concept of forests and plantations, types of vegetation and forests, factors
governing vegetation, role of trees and forests in environment, various forestry
programmes of the govt. of India, urban forests, chipko andolan
6) Conservation of environment: the concepts of conservation and sustainable
development, why to conserve, aims and objectives of conservation, policies of
conservation; conservation of life support systems-soil, water, air, wildlife, forests
7) Management of solid waste: merits and demerits of different ways of solid waste
management- open dumping, landfill, incineration, resource reduction, recycling and
reuse, vermicomposting and vermiculture, organic farming
8) Indoor environment: pollutants and contaminants of the in-house environment;
problems of the environment linked to urban and rural lifestyles; possible adulterants
of the food; uses and harms of plastics and polythene; hazardous chemicals, solvents
and cosmetics
9) Global environmental issues: global concern, creation of UNEP; conventions on
climate change, convention on biodiversity; stratospheric ozone depletion, dangers
associated and possible solutions
10) Indian laws on environment. : Indian laws pertaining to environmental protection:
environment (protection) act, 1986; general information about laws relating to control
of air, water and noise pollution. What to do to seek redressal
11) Biodiversity: what is biodiversity, levels and types of biodiversity, importance of
biodiversity, causes of its loss, how to check its loss; hotspot zones of the world and
India, biodiversity act, 2002
12) Noise and microbial pollution: pollution due to noise and microbes and their effects
13) Human population and environment: population growth and family welfare
programme, human health, HIV AIDS, human rights
14) Social Issues: environmental ethics: issues and possible solutions, problems related to
lifestyle, sustainable development: consumerisms and waste generation
15) Local environmental issues: environmental problems in rural and urban areas,
problem of congress grass & other weeds problems arising from the use of pesticides
and weedicides smoking etc.
Practical
Depending on the available facility in the institute, a visit to vermicomposting units or
any other such non-polluting eco-friendly site or planting/caring of vegetation/trees could be
taken and report be prepared.
Evaluation Scheme
Above 15 topics to be covered in 25 hour lectures in total, with 2 lectures in each topics from
2 to 11 and one each for the topics 1 & 12 to 15.
1 Examination pattern: Fifty multiple choice questions (with one correct and three incorrect
alternatives and no marks deduction for wrong answer or un-attempted question),
2 All questions compulsory i.e. no choice,
3 Qualifying marks 33 per cent i.e. 17 marks out of 50,
4 Total marks: 50, Credits = 2.5
5 Duration of examination: 60 minutes.
6 Spread of questions: Minimum of 2 questions from each of the topics 1 and 12 to15
66
Minimum of 4 questions from topics 2 to 11
Suggested Readings
1) Prabhakar, V.K.(2006), Environmental Education. Anmol Publications, New Delhi.
2) Ghosh, A. (2008), Environmental Issues and Concerns. APH Publishers, New Delhi.
3) Radha, S. & Sankhyan, A.S. (2008), Environmental Challenges of the 21st century.
Deep & Deep Publications, New Delhi.
4) Rasure, K.A. (2007), Environment and Sustainable Development. Serials Publications,
New Delhi.
5) Reddy, G.S. & Krishnamacharyulu, V.(2009), Environmental Education. Neel Kamal
Publications, New Delhi.
6) Alkazi, F. (2009), Exploring an Environment. Orientblack Swan, Hyderabad.
7) Gupta, K.R. (2009), Encyclopaedia of Environment. Atlantic Publishers, New Delhi.
8) Pandey, B.N. & Kulkarni,G.K. (2008), Environment & Development. APH
Publications, New Delhi.
9) Rao, V.K. & Reddy, R.S. (2009), Environmental Education. Commonwealth
Publishers, New Delhi.
10) Kumar, A.(2005), Environmental Protection in India. New Century Publications,
New Delhi.
11) Indigeneous Vision: Peoples of India, Attitudes to the Environment. Sage
Publications, New Delhi.
12) World Health Organization (1992), Our Planet, Our Health. A report of WHO
13) Commission on Health and Environment, WHO, Geneva.
14) World Health Organization (1993), Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality. Vol.1,
WHO, Geneva.
15) Keller, A. E. (1982), Environmental Geology. Merril Publishing Co., London
16) Botkin, D. B. (1990), Discordant Harmonies: A New Ecology for The Twenty-
First Century. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
17) Ehrlich, P. R. & Ehrlich, A. H. (1990), The Population Explosion. Simon
& Schuster, New York.
18) World Resources Institute (1994), World Resources:1994-95. Oxford University
Press, New York.
19) Dani, H.M.(1996), Environmental Education. Publication Bureau, Panjab University,
Chandigarh.
20) Chandna, R.C. (2003), Environmental Education. Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi.
67
GENERAL PRACTICUM
BABED-SRPC21
SCHOOL RELATED PRACTICUM
MARKS 100 (INTERNAL)
CREDITS 5
Following individual/ cooperative activities will be taken up:
• Study the syllabus of any one class of school level and extract the segments which
cater to individual students needs.
• Visit to a recognized school and prepare a report featuring on institutional
environment.
• Co- living with wider life will be initiated through planting and nurturing one plant
each in the campus and awareness about beautification of campus.
BABED-LSTC21
LIFE SKILLS TRAINING
MARKS 100 (INTERNAL)
CREDITS 5
Two skills will be taken up:
1 Skill of decision making
2 Skill of interpersonal communication skills
Formal training into these skills will be provided by the teacher through critical evaluation
techniques and techniques of improving inter personal communication skills through team
work and activities and modules related with the development of inter personal skills.
TUTORIALS
The students will be associated with one teacher, who will supervise individual progress on
school related practicum, improvement in life skills, sessional work of various subjects,
general problems related to academics and interaction among themselves etc. Also, the
talent of individual students will be explored and nurtured.
68
B.A. Hons. (Edu.) B.Ed.
SEMESTER III (Session 2011-12)
COURSE STRUCTURE FOR SEMESTER III
S.N. NATURE SUBJECT CODE SUBJECT TITLE LECTURE TUTORIAL PRACTICAL CREDITS
1 COMPULSORY BABED-ENGC32 ENGLISH 5 0 0 5
2 ONE OF TWO BABED-PBIC32
BABED-HCPC32
PUNJABI
HISTORY & CULTURE
OF PUNJAB
5
5
0
0
0
0
5
5
3 & 4 TWO OF NINE BABED-ECOO32
BABED-ENGO32
BABED-GEOO32
BABED-HINO32
BABED-HISO32
BABED-MATO32
BABED-POLO32
BABED-PBIO32
BABED-SOCO32
ECONOMICS
ENGLISH
GEOGRAPHY
HINDI
HISTORY
MATHS
POLITICAL SCIENCE
PUNJABI
SOCIOLOGY
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5 & 6 COMPULSORY BABED-EDUC05
BABED-EDU06
HUMAN
DEVELOPMENT
SCHOOL
COMMUNITY
PARTICIPATION
4
4
0
0
1
1
5
5
69
7 COMPULSORY BABED-SRPC32 SCHOOL RELATED
PRACTICUM
2 0 3
(IN FIELD)
5
8 COMPULSORY BABED-LSTC32 LIFE SKILLS TRAINING 4 0 1
(IN LIBRARY)
5
GRAND TOTAL
40
PAPER I: BABED-EDU05: HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• describe the concept of human development and its significance for education.
• describe the role of education in development and growth.
• discuss the principles of human growth and development.
• enumerate different stages of growth and development in the life span of human being.
Describe characteristics features of each stage.
• explain various theories of human development.
• highlight the role of heredity in development and growth.
Course Content
70
Unit I Study of human development: Its need, significance and relevance.
Role of education in human development
Unit II Principles of growth and development
Developmental aspects: physical, intellectual (with special references
on linguistic), emotional and social spiritual
Unit III Stages of growth and development in the life span with their
characteristics features
a) Pre-natal period and birth
b) Infancy
c) Early childhood
d) Late childhood
e) Adolescence
Unit IV
Unit V
Theories of human development: Psycho Analytic theory, Behavioral
theories, Cognitive theory
Role of heredity and environment in human development and growth
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work
comprising of a project:
• trace a family tree of own or others family and study the hereditary similarities and variations
in physical, temperamental aspects of members of different generations.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will be
required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3 Credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers
and seminars (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Kulshreshtha, S.P. (1997), Educational Psychology. Lall Book Depot, Meerut.
2) Aggarwal,J.C.(1999), Elementary Educational Psychology. Doaba House New Delhi.
3) Mangal, S.K. (1992), Educational Psychology. Prakash Brothers, Ludhiana.
4) Aggarwal, J.C. (2004), Essentials of Educational Psychology. Vikas Publishing House, New
Delhi.
5) Sharma,R.A. (2002), Fundamentals of Educational Psychology. R.LaIl Book Depot, Meerut.
6) Gupta, V.K. (2003), Psychology of Learning and Development. Vinod Publications,Agra.
7) Mathur, S.S. (1997), Educational Psychology. Vinod Pustik Mandir, Agra.
8) Chauhan, S.S. (2004), Advanced Educational Psychology. Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.,
New Delhi.
9) Bhatia, B.D.,& Safaya, R.N. (1999), Educational Psychology and Guidance. Dhanpat Rai and
Sons, Jalandhar.
71
PAPER II: BABED-EDU06: SCHOOL COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• describe concept of universalisation of elementary education, its need and importance.
• discuss concept of Sarv Shiksha Abiyan and its implementation.
• define the meaning and concept of Life Long Education.
• describe concept and implementation of vocationalization of education.
• highlight characteristics and the role of NCERT, SCERT, SIE, DIET, village education
committees, NGO’s, parent-teacher associations.
Course Content
Unit I Universalization of elementary education, Sarv Shiksha Abhiyan: concept and
implementation
Unit II Life Long Education: concept, techniques and importance
Unit III: Vocationalization of education: concept, meaning, importance; and implementation
Unit IV Role of different agencies: NCERT, SCERT, SIE, & DIET in
72
education
Unit V Role of village education committees, parent-teacher associations, NGO’s for
promotion of education
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work
comprising:
• visiting a school at the time of parent-teacher meet and spend one day with the teacher to
understand functioning of PTA’s.
• meet one or two members of a village education committee and prepare a report on the role,
functions and status of VEC in promotion of primary education of that village.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will be
required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3 Credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers
and seminars (20 marks: 1 Credit)
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance and classroom
interactions etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Aggarwal, J.C.(2004), Elementary Education and Teacher Education. Doaba Publication,
New Delhi.
2) Walia, J.S.(2004), School Administration and Organization. Paul Publication, Jalandhar.
3) Bhatia, K.K.(2001), Teaching Learning Process. Tandon Publication, Ludhiana.
4) Walia, J.S.( 2O02), Principles and Methods of Education. Paul Publication, Jalandhar.
5) Venkatalah, S.(2006), Life Long and Continuing Education. Anmol Publication, New Delhi.
6) Rahi, A.L. (1996), Adult Education Policies and Programmes. Associate Publisher, Ambala
Cantt.
7) Yadav, R.S. (2000), Adult Education Training and Productivity. Indian Publication, Ambala
Cantt.
73
PAPER III: BABED-ENGC32: ENGLISH (COMPULSORY)
Marks (Credits)
Total Marks (Credits) = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives of Teaching English
After instructions, the students shall be able to :
• Make use of competence in all the four skills i.e. Listening, Speaking , Reading and Writing.
• Describe and use new pedagogic practices in the teaching of both language and literature.
• Devise and promote student centric pedagogic techniques for the teaching of English.
• Describe implications of teaching/learning language through literature.
Prescribed Text
Colours of Expression by Harbhajan Singh, published by Publication Bureau, Panjab Univesity,
Chandigarh.
Course Content
Unit I (Poetry)
Poems 1,2,3,4,5 from the Text Colours of Expression by Harbhajan Singh
Unit II (Stories)
1. The Tell – Tale Heart
2. The Model Millionaire
3. The Prize Poem
From the Text Colours of Expression by Harbhajan Singh
74
Unit III (Prose)
1. Prayer
2. My Childhood
3. John Fitzgerald Kennedy
from the text Colours of Expression by Harbhajan Singh
Unit IV
Word Formation from Prose and stories and their use in sentences.
Use of Textual Words and Idioms in sentences.
Unit V
Official, Business and letters to the editor.
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of internal assessment based on terminal
examinations, attendance, classroom interactions, snap test etc.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will
be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (80 marks: 4
Credits).
ii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance and
classroom interactions etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1. Hewings, M.(2007). Advanced English Grammar. Cambridge University Press India
Ltd, New Delhi.
2. Singh, V.R.(2009). The Written Word. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
3. Colours of Expression by Harbhajan Singh published by Publication Bureau, Panjab
University, Chandigarh.
4. Sethi, M ( 2008), Handbook of Standard English and Indian Usage, PHI Learning Pvt
Ltd, New Delhi.
5. Singh V.R. (2009) the written word, Oxford University Press, India, New Delhi.
6. Gordon Ian (2000), Practical Letter Writing, Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi.
7. Browing D.C. (1998), Roget's Thesauris of English Word and Phrases, Oxford
University Press, India, New Delhi.
75
PAPER- IV: BABED-PBIC32: PUNJABI (COMPULSORY)
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
• fJ; g/go dk wzst ftfenkoEhnK B{z tkose s/ fJeKrh s'A ikD{ eotkT[Dk
j?.
• fBpzX s/ fJeKrh dk pj[ gZyh nfXn?B eoB dh ;{M g?dk eoBk j?.
• fBpzXekoK s/ fJeKrhekoK dh ;kfjse y/so ftu G{fwek B{z fBôfus eoBk j?.
• ftukoK d/ soshp pZX gqrNkU B{z T[GkoBk j?.
• Gkôk ftu tkeK dh tos'A pko/ ;[u/s eoBk j?.
gkmeqw
1H fBpzX gqekô, ;zgkH vkH eoB?b f;zx fEzd, gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gzikp
:{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ
2H S/ u'Dt/A fJeKrh, ;zgkH vkH n?BH n?Z;H eg{o, gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gzikp
:{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ
3H bx{ gqôB
4H ftnkeoD
Course Content
UNIT – 1
(T) fBpzX gqekô ftZu'A gq;zr ;fjs ftnkfynk (d' ftZu'A fJe) 8
(n) fBpzX gqekô ftZu'A fe;/ fBpzX dk ;ko (d' ftZu'A fJe)
8
76
UNIT – 2
S/ u'Dt/A fJeKrh (gfjb/ fszB fJeKrhnK ftZu'A) fe;/ fJe fJeKrh dk ftôk, ;ko
iK gkso fusoD (d' ftZu'A fJe)
16
UNIT – 3
fe; fJe fBpzXeko dk ihtB ouBk ns/ :'rdkB (fgzqH s/ik f;zx, r[opõô f;zx
gqhsbVh, pboki ;kjBh, tDikok p/dh, e[bpho f;zx eKr) (d' ftZu'A fJe)
16
UNIT – 4
fBpzX gqekô ns/ S/ u'Dt/A fJeKrh (gfjb/ fszB fJeKrh) ftZu'A bx{ gqôB T[Zso
(d; ftZu'A nZm)
2x8=16
UNIT – 5
(T) fuZmh-gZso (d' ftZu'A fJe) 6
(n) g?ok gVQ e/ gqôBK d/ T[Zso d/D/ 6
(i) g?oQ/ dk f;ob/y
(ii) seohpB uko T[bhe/ ôpdK d/ noE
(iii) BKt, fefonk, ftô/ôD ns/ g?oQ/ Bkb ;zpzfXs d' j'o gqôB g[ZS/
ikDr/.
(J) ;kXkoB, ;z:[es, fwôos tkeK dk nkg;h tNKdok 4
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations conducted by the teacher. The remaining will be covered in the form of
internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, class interactions, snap test etc.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will be
required to attempt one question from each of the five units (80 marks: 4 Credits).
ii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) ethnK Bkb ;zpzfXs eftsktK T[jBK dhnK tZy-tZy g[;seK ftZu'A
fJZemhnK ehshnK ikDrhnK.
2) ejkDh ekoK dhnK ejkDhnK T[jBK d/ ejkDh ;rqfjnK ftZu'A
bJhnK rJhnK ikDrhnK.
3) gzikph ;kfjs dh T[sgsh s/ ftek;-gofwzdo f;zx, feogkb f;zx
e;/b (1968) bkj"o p[Ze ôkg b[fXnkD.
4) gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; (1987)- gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh,
uzvhrVQ..
5) ekft d/ sZs-gq/w gqekô f;zx (1970)- bkj"o p[Ze ôkg
b[fXnkDk.
6) gzikph nfXn?B s/ nfXnkge d/ w[Yb/ ;zebg-ihs f;zx
i'ôh(1999), tko; ckT{Av/ôB nzfwqs;o
77
7) gzikph Gkôk fbZgh ns/ ftnkeoB- vkH ôod/t f;zx frZb
(2000)b'e rhs gqekôB, uzvhrVQ
8) gzikp d/ w"fbe s/ gozgokrs ekft-o{gkeko, vkH e[bdhg f;zx
Xho (2000) gpbhe/ôB fpT[o' gzikph :{Bh, gfNnkbk.
9) ;kfjs d/ o{g-gzikph :{Bhtof;Nh gfNnkbk.
10) gzikph ftnkeoB- p{Nk f;zx pokV (2004) tko; ckT{Av/ôB
nzfwqs;o
11) wZXekbh ôpd ;fGnkuko- irpho f;zx (1999)
PAPER-IV: BABED-HCPC32: HISTORY AND CULTURE OF PUNJAB (COMPULSORY)
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• describe the religion, political conditions of Punjab.
• explain characteristic features of society and culture in Punjab during Turko-Afghan rule.
• highlight characteristics features of society in Punjab during Mughal regime.
• discuss concept, salient features and impact of Bhakti movement and Sufism on society of
Punjab.
• describe life, travels and teachings of Guru Nanak with special emphasis on concept of
Langar and Sangat.
• trace the development of Sikhism in Punjab.
• explain the contributions of Guru Angad Dev, Guru Amar Das and Guru Ram Das.
• describe how Adi Granth was compiled.
Course Content
Unit-I
Society and culture in Punjab during the Turko-Afghan rule
The Punjab under the great Mughals
Unit II
Bhakti movements – salient features and impact on society
Sufism in Punjab – salient features and impact on society
Unit III
Guru Nanak – life and travels
Teaching of Guru Nanak, concept of Langar and Sangat
Unit IV
Development of Sikhism – contribution of Guru Angad Dev , Guru
Amar Das and Guru Ram Das
Compilation of Adi Granth and martyadom of Guru Arjun Dev
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of internal assessment based on terminal
examinations, attendance, classroom interactions, snap test etc.
Evaluation Scheme
In all, nine questions will be set. Each question will carry 16 marks.
78
vi. First question shall be short answer type containing 12 short questions spread
over the whole syllabus. Candidates will attempt 8 out of the 12 questions in
about 25 to 30 words each. It shall carry 16 marks and shall be compulsory.
Rest of the paper shall contain four units. Each unit shall have two essay type
questions and the candidate shall attempt one question from each unit. Each
essay type question will be set on half of the topics and not on a single subtopic.
(80 marks: 4 Credits)
ii) Internal assessment based on terminal examination attendance,
classroom interaction etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1. Singh,K.(1990), History and Culture of the Punjab-Part II (Medieval Period). Publication
Bureau, Punjabi University, Patiala.
2. Singh, F. (1972), A History of the Sikhs. Vol. III. Punjabi University, Patiala.
3. Grewal, J.S.(1990), The Sikhs of the Punjab. The New Cambridge History of India. Orient
Longman, Hyderabad.
4. Singh, K.(1991), A History of the Sikhs- Vol. I (1469-1839). Oxford University Press, New
Delhi.
5. Chopra, P.N., Puri, B.N., & Das, M.N.(1974), A Social, Cultural & Economic History of
India. Vol. II. Macmillan India, New Delhi.
(C) OPTIONAL SUBJECTS (PAPER V and VI)
The student is required to take up two elective/optional subjects from the following nine
subjects in semester I these will continue till semester VI. Each of these optional papers will be of 100
marks.
i) English
ii) Hindi
iii) Punjabi
iv) History
v) Political Science
vi) Economics
vii) Sociology
viii) Geography
ix) Mathematics
79
1. ENGLISH (ELECTIVE)
BABED-ENGO32
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• make use of competence in all the four skills i.e. listening, speaking , reading and
writing.
• describe implications of teaching/learning language through literature.
• develop the power of imagination through literature.
Unit I
Literary terms and definitions:
Picaresque novel, Stream of Consciousness, Historical novel, Gothic novel, Sentimental novel,
Epistolary novel, Social novel, Didactic novel, Detective fiction, Science fiction, Protagonist and
Antagonist, Point of View, Epic, Satire, Plot
Unit II
Novel: Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Unit III
Poem No. 1- To His Dear Friend (William Shakespeare)
Poem No. 2 – Blow! Blow! Thou Winter Wind (William Shakespeare)
Poem No. 3 – On His Twentythird Birthday ( John Milton )
Poem No. 4 – Human Folly ( Alexander Pope )
Poem No. 5 – God Made The Country (William Cowper )
Poem No. 6 – The World is too much with us ( William Wordsworth )
Poem No. 7 – To The Cuckoo ( William Wordsworth )
Poem No. 8 – This Lime-Tree Bower my Prison ( S.T. Coleridge )
Poem No. 9 – The Prisoner of Chillon ( Lord Byron )
Poem No. 10 – On This Day I Complete my Thirty Sixth Year ( Lord Byron )
Poem No. 11 – Song to the men of England ( P.B. Shelly )
From the book Glimpses of English Poetry by G.L. Sharma
Unit IV
Grammar and composition:
Narrative/Descriptive essay
Applied Grammar: completion of sentences
Use of same word as different part of speech
Teaching Learning Experiences
80
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work comprising of a project
on:
• literary works of Jane Austen
Evaluation Scheme:
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question shall
be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of ten
short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1. Tickoo,C. & Kumar,J.S .(2000), Writing with a Purpose. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
2. Fifteen Poets. (1988), Oxford University Press India. Calcutta.
3. Hewings, M.(2007), Advanced English Grammar. Cambridge University Press India Ltd, New
Delhi.
4. Singh, V.R.(2009), The Written Word. Oxford University Pess. New Delhi.
5. Austen, J. (2008), Pride and Prejudice. UBS Publishers, New Delhi.
6. Abrams, M.H. (2007), A Glossary of Literary Terms. Thomson Wadsworth, New Delhi.
7. Cuddon, J.A.(1998),The Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory. Penguin
Books India (P) Ltd., New Delhi.
8. Rao, V.K. (2007), Peculiar English. Neelkamal Publications, New Delhi.
9. Sharma, G.L. (2008), Glimpses of English Poetry. Publication Bureau, Panjab University,
Chandigarh.
81
2. HINDI (ELECTIVE)
BABED-HINO32
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
lesLVj&3
mís';
vè;;u izfØ;k ds lekiu ds mijkUr fo|kFkhZ %
• fn, x, dfo;ksa dh ikB;oLrq ds lUnHkZ esa O;k[;k&lfgr [k’M djsaxs A
• dfo&ifjp;] lkj vkSj mös'; lEcUf/r iz'u dj ldsaxsaA
• eLVj vfHkeU;q dh lUnHkZ lfgr O;k[;k djsaxs A
• ik=kksa ds pfj=k fp=k’k] rRoksa ds vk/kj ij ukVd dh leh{kk rFkk leL;k dj ldsaxsaA
• rajx’kh o feLVj vfHkeU;q ls lacfU/r y?kq iz'uksa ds mÙkj fy[k ldsaxsaA
• jhfrdky dh ifjfLFkfr;k¡] ukedj’k] lhek fu/kZj’k] izo`fr;ka] jhfrc¼ vkSj jhfr eqDr dkO; dh izeq[k
fo'ks"krkvksa dk o’kZu dj ldsaxsaA
• jhfr dkO; ds izeq[k dfo;ksa ds lEcU/ esa leh{kkRed iz'u dk mÙkj ns ik;saxsA
• vk/qfud dky ds dsoy dfork [k’M esa ls HkkjrsUnq ;qx] f}osnh ;qx] Nk;kokn] izxfrokn] iz;ksxkokn]
vkSj ubZ dfork ds izeq[k izo`fr;ksa lEcfU/r leh{kk fy[k ldsaxsaA
Course Content
Unit 1
- rajafx.kh&euksgj yky vkuUn
iatkc ;wfuoflZvh ifCyds'ku C;wjks] p.Mhx<+
fuEufyf[kr dfo ikB~;Øe esa fu/kZfjr gSa %
eSfFkyh'kj.k xqIr] t;'kadj izlkn] lw;ZdkUr f=kikBh fujkyk] lqfe=kkuUnu iar] egknsoh oekZ] vKs;]
/eZohj Hkkjrh
(d) nks lUnHkZ& lfgr&O;k[;k&[k.M djus gksaxsA dqy pkj [k.M iwNs tk;saxsA
([k) dfo&ifjp; lkj vkSj mís'; lEcU/h iz'u iwNs tk;saxsA izR;sd mÙkj dh 'kCn lhek 200 gksxhA
Unit II
feLVj vfHkeU;q
Mkñ y{eh ukjk;.k yky
(d) lUnHkZ lfgr O;k[;k ds fy;s nks [k.M iwNs tk;saxs] mÙkj ,d dk gh nsuk gksxkA
([k) ik=kksa ds pfj=k fp=k.k] rÙoksa ds vk/kj ij ukVd dh leh{kk rFkk leL;k lEcU/h nks iz'ku
iwNs tk;saxs mÙkj ,d dk gh nsuk gksxkA blds fy, 10 vad fu/kZfjr gSA
Unit III
fgUnh lkfgR; dk bfrgkl&jhfrdky (dsoy dkO; [k.M)
jhfrdky dh ifjfLFkfr;ka] ukedj.k] lhek fu/kZj.k] izo`fr;ka] jhfrc¼ vkSj jhfr eqDr dkO; dh izeq[k
fo'ks"krk,a] jhfr dkO; ds izeq[k dfo&ds'ko] fcgkjh] ?kukuan ij vk/kfjr lhe{kkRed iz'uA
Unit IV
fgUnh lkfgR; dk bfrgkl&vk/qfud dky (dsoy dkO; [k.M)
vk/qfud dky ds dsoy dfork [k.M esa ls HkkjrsUnq ;qx] f}osnh ;qx] Nk;kokn] izxfrokn] iz;ksxokn
vkSj ubZ dfork dh dsoy izeq[k izo`fÙk;ksa ij vk/kfjr leh{kkRed iz'uA
82
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations conducted by the teacher. The remaining will be covered in the form of
individualized work comprising of a project on:
1- ikB~;Øe esa fn;s x;s fdlh Hkh ,d dfo ds dforkvksa dh leh{kk djsaA
2- jhfr dky ds fdlh ,d dfo ds ys[ku dk;Z dh leh{kk djsaA
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
lanHkZxzaFk lwph
1- ckgjh gjnso (2004) fgUnh mn~Hko fodkl vkSj :i] fdrko egy] bykgkcknA
2- flag cgknqj (2008) fgUnh lkfgR; dk bfrgkl] ek/o izdk'ku] ;equk uxjA
3- lkguh ,l-ch- ,oa 'kekZ vkj-ih- (2007) loksZÙke fgUnh O;kdj.k] lkguh izdk'ku] vkxjkA
4- prqosZnh jkts'oj izlkn (2008) fgUnh O;kdj.k] midkj izdk'ku] vkxjkA
5- uxsUnz gjn;ky (2009) fgUnh lkfgR; dk bfrgkl] e;wj isijcSDl] uks;M+kA
83
3. PUNJABI (ELECTIVE)
BABED-PBIO32
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
• fJ; g/go dk T[d/ô ftfdnkoEhnK B{z wZXekbh gzikph eftsk d/ nyhob/ gVkn
pko/ ikDekoh d/Dk j?.
• ejkDh ftôk ftZu ftfdnkoEhnK dh fdbu;gh irkT[Dk j?.
• gzikph ;kfjs d/ fJfsjk; d/ sZEK B{z fBôfus eoBk j?. ejkDh ;kfjso{gK
s'A ftfdnkoEhnK B{z ikD{ eotkT[Dk j?.
gkmeqw
1H wZXekb dh u'DthA gzikph eftsk, (;zgkH) gq'H gqhsw f;zx, gpbhe/ôB
fpT{o', gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ
2H nZm/ gfjo (gfjbhnK uko ejkDhnK), vkH dbhg e"o fNtkDk, gpbhe/ôB
fpT{o', gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ
3H bx{ gqôB
4H b'e-;kfjs d/ o{g
5H Szd-gqpzX
Course Content
:{fBN ns/ Ehw
UNIT - 1
wZXekb dh u'DthA gzikph eftskL
(i) gq;zr ;fjs ftnkfynk (d' ftZu'A fJe) 6
(ii) eftsk dk e/Adoh Gkt dZ; e/ ;ko fby' (d' ftZu'A fJe) 9
UNIT - 2
nZm/ gfjoL
(i) ejkDh dk ftôk t;s {(d' ftZu'A fJe) 8
(ii) ejkDh dk ;ko (d' ftZu'A fJe) 7
UNIT - 3
wZXekb dh u'DthA gzikph eftsk ns/ nZm/ gfjo (gfjbhnK uko ejkDhnK) s/
nkXkfos bx{ gqôB (nZmK ftZu'A gzi)
15
UNIT - 4
(T) b'e ;kfjs d/ o{g (d' ftZu'A fJe)
(i) feZ;k
(ii) tko
(iii) ekøh
84
(iv) izrBkwk 8
(n) Szd-gqpzXL(d' ftZu'A fJe)
(i) d'fjok
(ii) ;'omk
(iii) e'oVk
(iv) dtZJhnk 7
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations conducted by the teacher. The remaining will be covered in the form of
individualized work comprising of a project on:
• wZXekbh gzikph ekft-XkoktK pko/ ;zy/g ftu fby' . iK
• gzikph ;kfjs ftZu vka dbhg e"o fNtkDk dk :'rdkB.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
vii) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits)
viii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
ix) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings:
1 wZXekb dh u'Dt] gzikph eftsk - vkH gqhsw f;zx (;zgkH) gpbhe/ôB
fpT{o', uzvhrVQ.
2 nZm/ gfjo - dghb e"o fNtkDk (;zgkH) gpbhe/ôB fpT{o' uzvhrVQ.
3 gzikph ;kfjs dh T[sgsh - vkH jfoGiB f;zx
4 gzikph ;kfjs dh T[sgsh s/ ftek; (1968) feogkb f;zx e;/b, gofwzdo f;zx
r'fpzd f;zx bKpk, bkj"o p[Ze ôkg, b[fXnkDK.
5 gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk;(1987) gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ
6 gzikh ;kfjs dk fJfsjk;(1972) gzikph :{Bhtof;Nh, gfNnkbk
4. HISTORY
BABED-HISO32
HISTORY OF INDIA 1750-1964 AD
Marks (Credits)
85
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the student will be able to:
• describe the cause for the rise of British power in India.
• describe with a focus on the rise of national consciousness against the British Colonialism in
1857.
• describe the role of nationalist leaders like Gandhi and other political leaders in freedom
struggle of India.
• describe and differentiate various socio-religious reform movements for modernizing India.
• explain the growth of communal politics and ideology that became an important cause of
partition of India.
Unit-I
Foundation of British rule: Circumstances leading to the battles of Plassey and Buxar and their
significance; Dual system of Clive; reforms of Warren Hastings
Administrative reforms: Reforms of Cornwallis, William Bentinck and Dalhousie
The uprising of 1857: Political, socio-religious, economic and immediate causes; failure;
results; nature of the uprising
Unit-II
Economic changes: British agrarian policies; commercialization of agriculture; rural indebtedness;
de-industrialization and growth of modern industry; theory of economic drain
Socio-religious reform movements: Brahmo Samaj; Aligarh Movement; Arya Samaj; Ramakrishna
Mission; Swami Vivekananda's contribution
Depressed classes movement: Contribution of Jyotiba Phule, B.R. Ambedkar and Mahatama
Gandhi
Unit-III
Growth of political consciousness: Causes for the growth of political
consciousness/nationalism; foundation of the Indian National Congress; national movement
up to 1919
Indian National Movement: Gandhi's emergence; circumstances leading to the noncooperation
movement and its significance; demand for complete independence; the civil
disobedience movement
Rise of communal politics: Factors responsible for the growth of communal politics; separate
electorate; Muslim League and Pakistan resolution
Unit-IV
Towards partition and independence: Quit India Movement; British proposals for independence;
Indian independence act of 1947
Significant developments after independence; 1947-64: making of the constitution; integration of
princely states; the reorganization of states; industrial and agricultural development
Map: Important historical places - Delhi, Calcutta, Madras, Bombay, Goa, Pondichery, Surat,
Plassey, Buxar, Gwalior, Jhansi, Hyderabad, Sabarmati, Amritsar, Lucknow, Lahore and Aligarh
Extent of the British Empire in 1856
Republic of India in 1950
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work
comprising of a project:
86
• to prepare a scrapbook or project report on freedom struggle of India.
• documentary movie (Indian independence struggle and partition)
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 Credits). The syllabus has been divided into four units.
There shall be 9 questions in all. The first question shall be short answer type containing 10
questions spread over the whole syllabus and each to be answered in about 25 to 30 words. The
candidate is required to attempt any 6 short answer type questions i.e. 2 marks of each. It shall
carry 12 marks and shall be compulsory question. Rest of the paper shall contain 4 units. Each
unit shall have two questions and the candidates shall be given internal choice i.e. the candidates
shall attempt one question from each unit. Each question carries 12 marks. The paper-setter
would avoid repetition between different types of questions within one question paper.
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit)
Suggested Readings
1. Singh, K.(1990), History and Culture of the Punjab.Part II (Medieval Period). Publication
Bureau, Punjabi University, Patiala.
2. Singh, F. (1972), A History of the Sikhs.Vol. III. Punjabi University, Patiala.
3. Grewal, J.S.(1990), The Sikhs of the Punjab. The New Cambridge History of India. Orient
Longman, Hyderabad.
4. Singh, K.(1991), A History of the Sikhs. Vol. I (1469-1839). Oxford University Press, New
Delhi.
5. Chopra, P.N., Puri, B.N., & Das, M.N.(1974), A Social, Cultural & Economic History of
India. Vol.II. Macmillan India, New Delhi.
5. POLITICAL SCIENCE
BABED-POLO32
INDIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
87
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, student will be to:
• describe the making of India’s constitution, composition and characteristics of the constituent
assembly.
• highlight the nature of Indian constitutional system.
• describe the nature and types of fundamental rights.
• discuss the directive principals of state policy, meaning of directive principals of state policy,
utility of directive principals and how they are different from fundamental rights.
• explain the nature of Indian federalism and centre-state relations.
• describe the constitutional provisions about the election, powers and functions of the Indian
President.
• explain the Indian parliamentary system, composition of the cabinet and powers and
functions of the Prime Minister.
• enumerate the features of Indian judicial system, powers of the supreme court and
composition and jurisdiction of the High Courts.
• discriminate the role of Governors, powers and functions of the council of ministers and Chief
Minister and explain the composition and powers of state assembly.
Course content
Unit-I
Constituent assembly: historical background and making of India's constitution
Basic features of Indian constitution
Preamble and its importance
Nature of Indian federalism and centre state relations: Emerging trends
Unit -II
Fundamental rights, Fundamental duties: nature, importance and a critique
Directive principles of the state policy
Fundamental duties: Educating the civil society
Unit-III
President: election, powers, position and changing role
Parliament: composition, powers and role
Indian cabinet and Prime Minister: election, powers and position
Supreme Court and High Court: composition, powers and role in the Indian constitutional process
Unit-IV
Governor: appointment, powers and role
State Legislature: composition, powers and role
Council of Ministers and Chief Minister: election, powers, position and role
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work
comprising of a project on:
• corporative working method (making a mock parliament in question answer mode )
• role of television in political education
• field trip to the Vidhan Sabha , Secretariat and High Court.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
88
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Austin,G.(1966), The Indian Constitution: Corner Stone of a Nation. Oxford University
Press, New Delhi.
2) Austin,G.(1999), Working a Democratic Constitution: A History of the Indian
Experience. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
3) Basu,D.D.(1994), An Introduction to the Constitution of India. Prentice Hall, New Delhi.
4) Bhambri,C.P.(1997), The Indian State Fifty Years. Shipra Publications, New Delhi.
5) Brass, P.(1990), Politics of India since Independence. Orient Longman, Hyderabad.
6) Brass,P. (1985),Caste, Faction and Party in Indian Politics, Vol. II: Election Studies.
Chanakya Publications, New Delhi.
7) Brass,P.(1995), Ethnic Groups and the State. Croom Helm, London.
8) Brass,P.(1974), Language, Religion and Politics in North India. Cambridge University
Press, London.
9) Chatterjee, P. (1999), State and Politics in India. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
10) Fadia,B.L.(1984), State Politics in India. Vol. II. Radiant Publishers, New Delhi.
11) Frankel,F.R.(2005), India's' Political Economy 1947-2004: The Gradual Revolution.
Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
12) Hasan, Z.(2002), Parties and Party Politics in India. Oxford University Press, New
Delhi.
13) Iqbal, N.(1967), State Politics in India. Meenakshi Parkashan, Meerut.
14) Jayal, N.G.(2001), Democracy in India. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
15) Kothari,R.(1988), State Against Democracy: In Search of Human Governance. Ajanta
Publishers, New Delhi.
16) Kumari,R.(1967), Politics in India. Orient Longman Bombay, Asia Publishing House,
New Delhi.
17) Noorani, A.G.(2000),Constitutional Questions in India. Oxford University Press, New
delhi.
18) Pylee,M.V.(1977), Constitutional Government in India. Asia Publishing House,
Bombay.
19) Pylee,M.V.(1998), An Introduction to the Constitution of India. Vikas Publishers, New
Delhi.
20) Venna,S.P. & Bhambri, C.P. (1967), Election and Politics Consciousness in India.
Meenakshi Parkshan, Meerut.
89
6. ECONOMICS
BABED-ECOO32
MACRO-ECONOMICS
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• describe the concept and scope of the gate level i.e. about the whole economy.
• describe how ROI and prices fluctuate in the market.
• discuss concept and functions of consumption and investment.
• discuss concept and various theories of money and interest.
• describe concept and process of banking and functions of commercial banks.
• describe concept, theories , measures of control of inflation.
90
• enumerate and discuss various policies to stabilize prices in the Indian economy.
Course content
Unit-I
Meaning and scope of macro economics
Determination of income and employment: Classical and Keynesian theory of income, output
employment. Say's law of markets, Aggregate demand and supply functions
Unit-II
Consumption and Investment Functions: Average and Marginal Propensity to Consume;
Static and Dynamic Multiplier; Marginal Efficiency of Capital. Investment: Types, Investment Demand
Schedule and Factors Affecting Investment Decisions
Unit-III
Theories of Money and Interest
Money: Its functions and role, money market and capital markets
Quantity theory of Money: Fisher's and Cambridge Equation and
Keynesian theory. Liquidity preference, theory of Rate of Interest
Banking: Major functions of commercial banks. Credit creation and credit control
Unit-IV
Inflation and macro economic policies: Theories of Inflation; Cost-push and Demand-pull,
measures to control of Inflation. Monetary and Fiscal policies for stabilization
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work
comprising of a project on:
• to explore some of the investment type in their own respective areas
• to visit one of the commercial bank in their surrounding and prepare a list of important
functions the bank is performing and compare it with some other banks.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question shall
be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of ten
short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1. Jain,T.R.(1997), Macro Economics. V.K. Publications, New Delhi.
2. Jhingan,M.L.(2003), Macro Economic Theory. Varinda Publishers, New Delhi.
3. Dernburg,T.F. & McDougal, D.M.(1983), Macro Economics. McGraw Hill, New York.
4. Sharma,O.P. (2003), Macro Economics. Punjabi University, Patiala.
5. Ghuman,R.S.(1998), Antar-Rashtriya Arth Vigyan. Punjabi University, Patiala.
6. Vaish,M.C.(2008),Macro Economic Theory. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
7. Harvey,J. & Johnson,M.(1971), Introduction to Macro Economics. McMillan, London
91
8. Gardner Ackley,G.(1985), Macro Economic Theory. McMillan, New York.
9. Baird,C.W.(1977), Elements of Macro Economics. West Publishing Company, London.
7. SOCIOLOGY
BABED-SOCO32
FUNDAMENTALS OF SOCIOLOGY
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objective
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• describe meaning , elements , status and norms and values of society
• discuss the concept and types of social change and role of education in bringing social
change.
• describe meaning, elements and functions of social stratification.
• highlight various forms of stratification with respect to caste and class.
• discuss the meaning and types of social mobility.
• enumerate and explain various factors which determine social mobility.
Unit -1
Social structure: meaning, elements, status, role, norms and values. Understanding of status
and role of teacher and student
Unit-II
92
Social change: meaning and types. Education as an agent of change, Globalization and challenges
for education
Unit-III
Social stratification: meaning and elements and functions. Forms of stratification: caste and class
.
Unit-IV
Social mobility: meaning, types and factors. Social determinants of educational attainment and
occupational status
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work
comprising:
• poster making or slogan writing on declining sex ratio in India.
• debate on internet / mobile use.
• documentary movies (AIDS , poverty, illiteracy, female feticide).
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Bottomore, T.B.(1995),Sociology: A Guide to Problem and Literature. Bombay, Blackie and
Sons (Hindi & English).
2) Dube, S.C.(1992),Understanding Change: Anthropological and Sociological Perspectives.
Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
3) Kuppuswamy, B.(1966), Social Change in Modem India. Allied Publications, Bombay.
4) Madan, G.R.(2008), Principles of Sociology. Print House India. New Delhi. (Hindi and English)
5) Wilbert,M.(1965), Social Change. Prentice Hall, New Delhi.
6) Brown,R(1959), Structure and Function in Primitive Society. Cohen and Wett, London.
7) Sharma, R.N.(1979), Principles of Sociology. Atlantic Publication, New Delhi.(Hindi and
English).
8) Srinivas, M.N.(1963), Social Change in Modem India. BerkeleyUniversity, California Press.
9) Talcott, P.(1959), Social System. Tavistock Pub., London.
10) Ruhela, S.P.(1999), Problems and Prospects. Associated Publishers , Ambala.
11) Madhurima(2005), Readings in Sociology. Part-II. New Academic Publishing House,
Jalandhar.
93
8. GEOGRAPHY
BABED-GEOO32
RESOURCES & ENVIRONMENT: WORLD PATTERNS
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• describe concept of resources and their interface with environment.
• examine use and misuse of various resources and analyze future prospects.
• discuss various methods and approaches of conservation and management of natural
resources.
• discriminate the quantitative and qualitative aspects of human resources in spatial
perspectives and the associated environmental problems.
Course Content
Unit-I
Meaning, nature and components of environment. Nature and definition of
resources. Resources: Environment interface
Unit-II
Classification of resources: renewable and non-renewable: biotic (forests, wildlife,
live-stock, fisheries, agricultural crops) & abiotic (land, water, minerals)
Unit-III
Distribution, availability, utilization and conservation of water, minerals and
94
energy resources, their economic and environmental significance and
sustainability
Types and distribution of forests- their economic and environmental significance
and conservation
Types and distribution of fisheries- their economic and environmental significance
and conservation
Major soil types and their distribution-problems of soil erosion and soil
conservation
Unit-IV
Human resources: quantitative and qualitative aspects of population; number,
distribution, density, growth, literacy and urbanization
Population resources relationship: population-resource regions of the world
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work
comprising:
• to survey local area to study biotic resources of the area.
• mapping of a local area; urban and rural, and compare causes of pollution in these areas.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Chandna, R.C.(1996), A Geography of Population. Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana.
2) Chandna, R.C.(1998), Environmental Awareness. Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana.
3) Chawla, I.N.(1999), Geography of Resources. Bharat Prakshan, Jalandhar.
4) Truman, A.H. & Alexander, J.W.(1994), Economic Geography. Prentice Hall of India, New
Delhi.
5) Khullar, D.R.(2000), India: A Comprehensive Geography. Kalyani Publishers, New delhi.
6) Singh, R.L.(1971), India : A Regional Geography. National Geographical Society of India.
Varanasi.
95
9. MATHEMATICS
BABED-MATO32
ADVANCED CALCULUS AND DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the student will be able to:
• state definitions of various mathematical terms required in the course.
• derive the tests and theorems prescribed in the statement of the syllabus.
• explain continuity with various terms.
• prove Mean value theorem, Darboux’s value theorem and Taylor’s theorem.
• discuss limits and continuity of two variables and various theorems related with functions of
two variables prescribed in the course.
• solve problems related with various classes of differential equations.
• solve problems related with transformations and its details, prescribed in the syllabus.
Unit–I
Definition of a sequence, theorems on limits of sequences. Bounded and monotonic
sequences, Cauchy's convergence criterion, Series of non-negative terms, Comparison tests,
Cauchy's Integral test, Ratio test, Cauchy's Root test. Raabe's Logarithmic, De Morgan and
Bertrand's tests, Gauss test. Alternating series, Leibnitz's theorem. Absolute and conditional
convergence
Unit-II
Continuity, sequential continuity, properties of continuous functions, Uniform continuity, proof
of chain rule of differentiability, mean value theorems and their geometrical interpretations. Darboux's
intermediate value theorem for derivatives, Taylor's theorem with various forms of remainders.
Maclaurian and Taylor series expansions limit and continuity of functions of two variables
96
Unit-III
Partial differentiation, change of variables, partial derivation and differentiability of real-valued
functions of two variables. Schwarz and Young's theorem, statements of inverse and implicit function
theorems and applications.Euler’s theorem on homogeneous functions. Taylor's theorem for
functions of two variables. Jacobians envelopes, evolutes. Maxima, minima and Saddle points of
functions of two variables. Lagrange's multiplier method
Unit–IV
Series solutions of differential equations-power series method, Bessel, Legendre and
Hypergeometric equations. Bessel, Legendre and Hypergeometric functions and their propertiesconvergence,
recurrence and generating relations. Orthogonality of functions, Sturm-Liouville
problem. Orthogonality of Eigen-functions. Reality of Eigen values. Orthogonality of Bessel functions
and Legendre polynomials
Laplace transformation. Linearity of the Laplace transformation. Existence theorem for Laplace
transforms of derivatives and integrals. Shifting theorems
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work like:
• teacher may familiarize the students with examples of course content.
• teacher will give extensive practice in the mathematical skills.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1. Sharma,D.R.(2009),Spectrum, Analysis Inc. Sharma Publications, Jalandhar.
2. Klaumber, G.(1975), Mathematical Analysis. Marcel Dekkar, Inc. New York.
3. Apostol, T.M.(1985), Mathematical Analysis. Narosa Publishing House, New Delhi.
4. Goldberg, R.R.(1970), Real Analysis. Oxford & I.B.H. Publishing Co., New Delhi.
5. Sundaram, D.S. & Choudhary, B.(1997), A First Course in Mathematical Analysis. Narosa
Publishing House, New Delhi.
6. Jain, P.K. & Kaushik, S.K.(2000), An Introduction to Real Analysis. S. Chand & Co., New
Delhi.
7. Spiegel, M.R.(1993), Theory and Problems of Advanced Calculus. Schaum Publishing Co.,
New York.
97
GENERAL PRACTICUM
BABED-SRPC32
SCHOOL RELATED PRACTICUM
MARKS 100 (INTERNAL)
CREDIT 5
The students will take up following projects:
• team project with 4-5 students to study the status of implementation of Sarv Shiksha Abhiyan
in a particular sector and report against criteria of school enrolment, and other facilities.
• a case study of family be taken up and study growth and development of a child in respect of
his heredity and environment.
BABED-LST32
LIFE SKILLS TRAINING
MARKS 100 (INTERNAL)
CREDIT 5
• Skill of social relations
• Skill of cooperative and team work
These skills will be polished through school related practicum / projects which involve team work and
social interactions. The training will be imparted under the supervision of tutors.
TUTORIALS
The students will be associated with one teacher, who will supervise individual progress on school
related practicum, improvement in life skills, sessional work of various subjects, general problems
related to academics and interaction among themselves etc. Also, the talent of individual students will
be explored and nurtured.
98
B.A. Hons. (Edu.) B.Ed.
SEMESTER–IV (Session 2011-12)
COURSE STRUCTURE FOR SEMESTER IV
S.N. NATURE SUBJECT CODE SUBJECT TITLE LECTURE TUTORIAL PRACTICAL CREDITS
1 COMPULSORY BABED-ENGC42 ENGLISH 5 0 0 5
2 ONE OF TWO BABED-PBIC42
BABED-HCPC42
PUNJABI
HISTORY & CULTURE
OF PUNJAB
5
5
0
0
0
0
5
5
3 & 4 TWO OF NINE BABED-ECOO42
BABED-ENGO42
BABED-GEOO42
BABED-HINO42
BABED-HISO42
BABED-MATO42
BABED-POLO42
BABED-PBIO42
BABED-SOCO42
ECONOMICS
ENGLISH
GEOGRAPHY
HINDI
HISTORY
MATHS
POLITICAL SCIENCE
PUNJABI
SOCIOLOGY
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5 & 6 COMPULSORY BABED-EDUC07
CURRICULUM
DEVELOPOMENT &
EVALUATION
4
0
1
5
99
BABED-EDU08
GUIDANCE AND
COUNSELLING
4
0
1
5
7 COMPULSORY BABED-SRPC42 SCHOOL RELATED
PRACTICUM
2 0 3
(IN FIELD)
5
8 COMPULSORY BABED-LSTC42 LIFE SKILLS TRAINING 4 0 1
(IN LIBRARY)
5
GRAND TOTAL
40
PAPER- I: BABED-EDU07: CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• describe the purpose and scope of curriculum.
• explain the various foundations of curriculum.
• differentiate between aims, goals and various levels of objectives statements from general
objectives, course objectives and lesson objectives.
• state levels of course content, subject centered curriculum, activity centered curriculum and
core centered curriculum.
• discuss different methods and media used in transactional processes.
• explain different types of evaluation and validation process of Norm and Criterion-Referenced
test.
Course Content
100
Unit I Curriculum: concept, nature, scope and foundations
Unit II National aspirations: aims /goals / objectives- course objectives, instructional
objectives, formulating objectives at different levels of Bloom Taxonomy
Unit III Course content: subject derivation of course content, dividing subjects into
units and lessons, sequence of contents into subject centered, activity
centered and core centered curriculum
Unit IV Transactional processes: methods and media; lecture, discussion, tutorials,
laboratory work, individualized instruction, multimedia and online instructions
Unit V Evaluation: formative, summative and diagnostic evaluation. Development
validation of Norm-referenced & Criterion referenced test
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work
comprising of a project:
i) to study a school in (a) slum or (b) middle class locality for;
• curriculum in action
• evaluating the curriculum
• kind of teaching and learning experiences ( classroom observation)
ii) choose a topic from your own area of specialization and write behavioral objectives at different
level
iii) prepare at least 5 test items of different type.
iv) practice handling of a projector.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
iv) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will be
required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3 Credits).
v) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers
and seminars (20 marks: 1 Credit).
vi) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Erickson, H.L.(1998), Concept Based Curriculum and Instruction. Corwin Press,Inc.
2) Goodson, I.F.(1994), Studying Curriculum. Open University Press, Buckingham.
3) Hugh, S.(1976). Designing the Curriculum. Open Books, London.
4) Iron, K.D.(1976), Objectives in Curriculum Design. Mcgraw Hill Book Company Limited,
England.
5) Pratt, D.(1980), Curriculum Design and Development. Harcourt Brace & World Inc., New York.
6) Taba, H.(1962),Curriculum Development: Theory and Practice. Harcourt Brace & World inc.,
New York.
7) Tyler, R.W.(1974), Basic Principles of Curriculum and Instruction. Open University Pub.,
London.
8) Zais, R.S.(1976), Curriculum Principles and Foundations. Harper & Row Pub., London.
101
PAPER-II: BABED-EDU08: GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• explain nature and scope of guidance and counselling.
• discuss the need and principles of guidance and counseling.
• understand different types of guidance.
• explain different types of tools and techniques, their needs and importance.
• describe various guidance and counselling services available in schools.
• explain the organization of guidance programme.
Course Content
102
Unit I Concept of guidance and counselling and their difference; nature,
scope and objectives, need of guidance, principles of guidance and
counselling
Unit II
Types of guidance: educational, vocational and personal guidance
(their meaning, objectives, need and importance)
Unit III Tools and techniques of guidance and counseling, characteristics,
qualification and role of a counsellor
Unit IV Guidance services: educational and occupational information service,
counselling service, placement service, individual inventory service
and follow up services
Unit V Organization of guidance program at secondary level, role of teacher,
headmaster, parents, guidance worker in organization of guidance
program
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work
comprising:
• to use at least one tool of providing counselling to secondary school
student.
• to prepare a counselling program for at least one student of class X.
• to prepare a unit of educational information programmes.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will
be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3
Credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term
papers and seminars (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Aggarwal, J.C. (1997), Educational, Vocational Guidance and Counselling. Doaba House,
Nai Narak, New Delhi.
2) Bhatia, K.K. (2008), Principles of Guidance and Counselling. Kalyani Publihers, New
Delhi.
3) Chauhan, S.S. (1982), Principles and Techniques of Guidance. Vikas Publication House,
New Delhi.
4) Nayak, A.K. (1997), Guidance and Counselling. APH Publishing Corporation, New Delhi..
5) Sidhu, H.S. (2005), Guidance and Counselling. Twenty first century Publications, Patialia.
6) Suri, S.P. & Sodhi, T.S. (2000), Guidance and Counselling. Bawa Publishers, Patiala.
7) Walia, J.S. (2008), Foundations of Guidance. Ahim Paul Publishers, Jalandhar.
103
PAPER III: BABED-ENGC42: ENGLISH (COMPULSORY)
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives of Teaching English
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• Describe and use new pedagogic practices in the teaching of both language and literature.
• Devise and promote student centric pedagogic techniques for the teaching of English.
• Describe implications of teaching/learning language through literature.
Prescribed Text
Colours of Expression by Harbhajan Singh, Published by Publication Bureau, Panjab Univesity,
Chandigarh.
Course Content
UNIT I
Poems 6,7,8,9,10,11 from the Colours of Expression by Harbhajan Singh
UNIT II
Short stories
1. The Stolen Bacillus
104
2. Accident
from the Text Colous of Expression by Harbhajan Singh
UNIT III
Essay/prose
1. Tight Corners
2. Last Expedition
from the Text Colous of Expression by Harbhajan Singh
UNIT IV
Translation
1. Translation from vernacular to English (Ten sentences)
2. Translation from English to M.I.L (Paragraph)
UNIT V
1. Expansion
2. Paragraph Writing – Descriptive, Reflective, Scientific and Philosophical
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of internal
assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions etc.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will
be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (80 marks: 4
Credits).
ii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance and
classroom interactions etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1. Ezekiel, N. & Others .(2003), Macmillan India Limited, Chennai.
2. Bhatia, K.K. (2008), Teaching and Learning English As A Foreign Language. Kalyani
Publishers, New Delhi.
3. Fifteen Poets. (1988), Oxford University Press India, Calcutta.
4. Hewings, M. (2007) . Advanced English Grammar, Cambridge University Press India Ltd,
New Delhi.
5. Jindal, D.V & Syal, P (2001), An Introduction to Linguistic, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.
6. Kumar, S.K. (2006),Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
7. Singh, V.R. (2009), The Written Word, Oxford University Press India, New Delhi.
8. Thomas, C.T. (2001), Macmillan India Limited, Chennai.
105
PAPER IV: BABED-PBIC42: PUNJABI (COMPULSORY)
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
• fJ; g/go dk wzst ftfdnkoEhnK ftZu fJeKrh ;zpzXh fBeN nfXn?B dh o[uh
g?dk eoBk j?.
• ;kfjsekoK d/ ihtB pko/ ft;Ekog{ote ukBDk gkT[Dk j?.
• ;kfjsekoK d/ :'rdkB pko/ ikDekoh d/Dk j?.
• ftnkeoD ftZu tke d/ ftfGzB o{gK dh gfjukD eotkT[Dk j?.
• ;kfjs o{gk ns/ SzdK ;zpzXh ikDekoh d/Dk j?.
gkmeqw
1H ôjhd Grs f;zx, b/ye-;[fjzdopho f;zx, e;s{oh bkb n?Av ;zB÷, nzfwqs;o
2H S/ u'Dt/A fJeKrh, ;zgkH vkH n?BH n?;H eg{o, gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gzikp
:{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ
3H bx{ gqôB
4H ftnkeoD
:{fBN ns/ Ehw
UNIT - 1
ihtBh dk ftôk iK fe;/ fJZe eKv dk ;ko (d' ftZu'A fJe) 16
UNIT - 2
S/ u'Dt/A fJeKrh (fgSbhnK fszB fJeKrhnK) ftZu'A fe;/ fJe dk ;ko, ftôk iK
gkso fusoD (d' ftZu'A fJe)
16
UNIT - 3
106
fe;/ fJe fJeKrheko dk ihtB, ouBk ns/ :'rdkB (nkJhH ;hH Bzdk, jouoB f;zx,
r[ouoB f;zx i;{ik, pbtzs rkorh, jouoB f;zx) (d' ftZu'A fJe)
16
UNIT - 4
ôjhd Grs f;zx ns/ S/ u'Dt/A fJeKrh (fgSbhnK fszB fJeKrhnK) ftZu'A bx{ gqôB
T[Zso (d; ftZu'A nZm) 2x8=16
UNIT - 5
(T) gzikph Gkôk d/ iBw, BkweoD, ftek; gVkn, gzikph T[g GkôktK ns/ gzikph
Gkôk T[go j'oBK GkôktK d/ gqGkt pko/ gqôB (fszB ftZu'A fJZe)
8
(n) pj[s/ ôpdK dh EK fJe ôpd (d; ftZu'A nZm) 4
(J) nr/so-fgS/so (d; ftZu'A nZm) 4
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of internal assessment
based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions etc.
Evaluation scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will be required to
attempt one question from each of the five units (80 marks: 4 Credits).
ii) Internal assessment based on terminal examination attendance, classroom interaction etc.
(20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) ethnK Bkb ;zpzfXs eftsktK T[jBK dhnK tZy-tZy g[;seK ftZu'A fJZemhnK
ehshnK ikDrhnK.
2) ejkDh ekoK dhnK ejkDhnK T[jBK d/ ejkDh ;rqfjnK ftZu'A bJhnK rJhnK
ikDrhnK.
3) gzikph ;kfjs dh T[sgsh s/ ftek;-gofwzdo f;zx, feogkb f;zx e;/b (1968)
bkj"o p[Ze ôkg b[fXnkD.
4) gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; (1987)- gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ..
5) ekft d/ sZs-gq/w gqekô f;zx (1970)- bkj"o p[Ze ôkg b[fXnkDk.
6) gzikph nfXn?B s/ nfXnkge d/ w[Yb/ ;zebg-ihs f;zx i'ôh(1999), tko;
ckT{Av/ôB nzfwqs;o
7) gzikph Gkôk fbZgh ns/ ftnkeoB- vkH ôod/t f;zx frZb (2000)b'e rhs
gqekôB, uzvhrVQ
8) gzikp d/ w"fbe s/ gozgokrs ekft-o{gkeko, vkH e[bdhg f;zx Xho (2000)
gpbhe/ôB fpT[o' gzikph :{Bh, gfNnkbk.
9) ;kfjs d/ o{g-gzikph :{Bhtof;Nh gfNnkbk.
10) gzikph ftnkeoB- p{Nk f;zx pokV (2004) tko; ckT{Av/ôB nzfwqs;o
11) wZXekbh ôpd ;fGnkuko- irpho f;zx (1999)
107
PAPER IV: BABED-HCPC42: HISTORY AND CULTURE OF PUNJAB (COMPULSORY)
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• describe the transformation of Sikhism.
• explain impact of Khalsa on the society of Punjab.
• explain struggle for sovereignty and role of Dal Khalsa.
• explain Ranjit Singh’s empire and significant development that occurred during medieval
period.
Course Content
Unit I
Transformation of Sikhism – Guru Hargobind's new policy
Martydom of Guru Teg Bahadur
Unit II
Foundation of Khalsa by Guru Gobind Singh
Impact of the foundation of the Khalsa on the society in Punjab
Unit III
Banda Bahadur and his achievements
Sikh struggle for sovereighty from 1716 to 1765 and the role of Dal Khalsa, Rakhi, Gurmat and Misls
Unit IV
Ranjit Singh’s rise to power, civil and military administration, relations with the British
Development of language, literature, education, art and architecture in the Punjab during the
medieval period
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of internal assessment based on terminal
examinations, attendance, classroom interactions etc.
Evaluation Scheme
In all, nine questions will be set. Each question will carry 16 marks.
108
vii. First question shall be short answer type containing 12 short questions spread
over the whole syllabus. Candidates will attempt 8 out of the 12 questions in
about 25 to 30 words each. It shall carry 16 marks and shall be compulsory.
Rest of the paper shall contain four units. Each unit shall have two essay type
questions and the candidate shall attempt one question from each unit. Each
essay type question will be set on half of the topics and not on a single subtopic
(80 marks: 4 Credits).
ii) Internal assessment based on terminal examination attendance, classroom
interaction etc. (20 marks : 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Chopra P.N., Puri, B.N., & Das, M.N.( 1974), A Social, Cultural & Economic History of
India. Vol.II, Macmillan India Limited, New Delhi.
2) Grewal, J.S. (1990), The Sikhs of the Punjab. The New Cambridge History of India, Orient
Longman, Hyderabad.
3) Singh, F. (1972), A history of the Sikhs Vol. III. Punjabi University, Patiala.
4) Singh, K. (1990), History and Culture of the Punjab. Part -II (Medieval Period). Publication
Bureau, Punjabi University, Patiala, (3rd edn.).
5) Singh,K. (1991), A History of the Sikhs. Vol. I. 1469-1839, Oxford University Press, New
Delhi.
(C) OPTIONAL SUBJECTS (PAPER V and VI)
The student is required to continue two elective/optional subjects from the following nine
subjects. Each paper will be of 100 marks.
1) English
2) Hindi
3) Punjabi
4) History
5) Political Science
6) Economics
7) Sociology
8) Geography
9) Mathematics
109
1. ENGLISH (ELECTIVE)
BABED-ENGO42
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• make use of competence in all the four skills i.e. listening, speaking , reading and writing.
• describe implications of teaching/learning language through literature.
• develop the power of imagination through literature.
Course Content
Unit I
Literary terms and definitions:
Sonnet, Lyric, Ballad, Blank Verse, Heroic Couplet, Ode, Myth, Allegory, Realism, Naturalism,
Renaissance, Neoclassic, Romanticism, Negative, Capability, Pathos
Unit II
Arms and the Man by G.B. Shaw published by Orient Longman, Hyderabad
Unit III
Poem No. 12 – To Wordsworth (P.B. Shelley)
Poem No 13 – The Human Seasons (John Keats)
Poem No 14 – La Belle Dame Sans Merci (John Keats)
Poem No 15 – The Children ( H.W. Longfellow)
Poem No 16 – The Revenge ( Lord Tennyson )
Poem No 17 – Evelyn Hope ( Robert Browning )
Poem No 18 – The Man He Killed ( Thomas Hardy )
Poem No 19 – On a Dead child ( Robert Bridges )
Poem No 20 – My Heart Sings at the Wonder of My Place ( Rabindranath Tagore)
Poem No 21 – Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening ( Robert Frost )
Poem No 22 – The Highwayman (Alfred Noyes)
From the book Glimpses of English Poetry by G.L. Sharma
Unit IV
Applied Grammar
Correction of different types of sentences
Analysis of sentences
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations by the teacher. The remaining will be covered in the form of
individualized work comprisig of a project:
110
• report on literary works of G.B. Shaw.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
iv) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
v) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
vi) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
10. Tickoo, C. & Kumar, J.S.(2000), Writing with a Purpose. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
11. Fifteen Poets. (1988), Oxford University Press India. Calcutta.
12. Hewings, M. (2007), Advanced English Grammar. Cambridge University Press India Ltd, New
Delhi.
13. Singh, V.R. (2009), The Written Word. Oxford University Pess. New Delhi.
14. Austen, J. (2008), Pride and Prejudice. UBS Publishers, New Delhi.
15. Abrams, M.H. (2007), A Glossary of Literary terms. Thomson Wadsworth, New Delhi.
16. Cuddon, J.A. (1998),The Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory. Penguin
Books India (P) Ltd., New Delhi.
17. Rao, V.K. (2007), Peculiar English. Neelkamal Publications, New Delhi.
111
2. HINDI (ELECTIVE)
BABED-HINO42
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
vè;;u izfØ;k ds lekiu ds mijkUr fo|kFkhZ %
• ,dkadh ds rRoksa ds vk/kj ij leh{kkRed iz'u djsaxs A
• fu/kZfjr ikB rRo esa ls de ls de 50 fVIif’k;ksa dk vH;kl djsaxs A
• ikB; Øe esa fn, x, ukVd vkSj ,dkadh dh ifjHkk"kk] rRo vkSj oxhSdj’k ij vk/kfjr nksuksa fo/kvksa
lEcU/h iz'u djsaxs
• O;ogkfjd O;kdj’k lEcfU/r iz'u dk mÙkj djsaxs A
• fu/kZfjr fo"k; ij lkj ys[ku djsaxs A
Course Content
uksV% i=k nks Hkk"kk&f'k{k.k dk O;kogkfjd iz;ksx gksxk rFkk Nk=kksa ij O;fDrxr :i ls è;ku nsuk
vfuok;Z gksxkA vr% d{kk vuqHkkx dh Nk=k la[;k 30&40 ds chp lhfer gksxhA
unit I
vkn'kZ ,dkadh laxzg lañ Mk- lalkj pUnz] iatkc ;wfuoflZvh ifCyds'ku C;wjks] p.Mhx<+ }kjk
izdkf'krA
d- ,dkadh ds rRoksa ds vk/kj ij leh{kkRed iz'u (lkj&ys[ku] pfj=k&fp=k.k] mís'; lEcU/h)
[k- lanHkZ lfgr O;k[;k ugha iwNh tk;sxh
Unit II
layXu 50 fVIif.k;ksa dk vH;kl
Unit III
leh{kk fl¼kUr% dsoy ukVd vkSj ,dkadh
ifjHkk"kk] rÙo vkSj oxhZdj.k ij vk/kfjr ukVd rFkk ,dkadh nksuksa fo/kvksa lEcU/h iz'u iwNs
tk;saxs
Unit IV
O;kogkfjd O;kdj.k
(d) lekd`fr fHkUukFkZd
112
([k) Loj laf/ ,oa O;atu lfU/
(x) lfU/&foPNsn (dsoy O;okgkfjd)
(?k) okD; 'kks/u
(M) fojke fpg~u
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work
comprising of a project on:
• 50 ,sls lekd`fr 'kCnksa dh lwph cuk;sa tks fHkUukFkZd gksA
• fdlh lekpkj i=k@if=kdk esa ls 20&25 okD;ksa dk okD; 'kks/ djsaA
• ikB;Øe esa nh x;h ,dkdh esa ls 4&5 fo|kFkhZ ds lewg esa ,dkdh izLrqr djsaA
Evaluation Scheme:
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1- pUnz lalkj (2006) vkn'kZ ,dkadh laxzg] iatkc ;qfuoflZVh ifCyds'ku C;wjks] p.Mhx<+A
2- dqekj lq'khy(2009) lkekU; fgUnh] iz;kx iqLrd Hkou] bykgkckn
3- flag cgknqj (2008) fgUnh lkfgR; dk bfrgkl] ek/o izdk'ku] ;equkuxjA
4- ckgjh gjnso (2004) fgUNh mn~Hko fodkl vkSj :i] fdrkc egy] bykgcknA
5- nhf{kr Hkkxhjfk (2003) leh{kkyksd] bUnzizLFk izdk'ku fnYyhA
6- tSu fueZyk (2006) ubZ leh{kk ds izfreku] us'kuy ifCyf'kax gkml] fnYyhA
7- frokjh HkksykukFk (2008) Hkk"kkfoKku] fdrkcegy ,tsUlht+] bykgcknA
113
4. PUNJABI (ELECTIVE)
BABED-PBIO42
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
• fJ; g/go dk T[d/ô ftfdnkoEhnK B{z gzikph ejkDh ;zpzXh ;zg{oB ikDekoh
d/Dk j?.
• ;øoBkwk okjhA ftfdnkoEhnK d/ nB[Gt B{z j'o v{zxk pDkT[Dk j?.
• gzikph ;kfjs d/ fJfsjk; ;zpzXh sZEK B{z j'o ;gZôN eoBk j?.
• ;øoBkwk ;kfjs o{g pko/ ft;Ekog{ote uouk eoBk j?.
gkmeqw
1H gZE jh wzf÷b j?, wBw'jB pktk, u/sBk gqekôB, b[fXnkDk
2H nZm/ gfjo, dbhg e"o fNtkDk, gpbhe/ôB, fpT{o', gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh,
uzvhrVQ
3H bx{ gqôB
4H wZXekbh gzikph ekft-XkoktK
5H ;fGnkuko ns/ gzikph ;fGnkuko
:{fBN ns/ Ehw
UNIT - 1
gZE jh wzf÷b j? (;øoBkwk)L (d' ftZu'A fJe)
(i) ftôk t;s{
(ii) gqw[Zy xNBktK
(iii) ;kfjse goy 15
UNIT - 2
nZm/ gfjo (fgSbhnK uko ejkDhnK)L(d' ftZu'A fJe)
(i) ejkDh dk ftôk-t;s{
(ii) ejkDh dk ;ko 15
UNIT - 3
gZE jh wzf÷b j? ns/ nZm/ gfjo (fgSbhnK ejkDhnK) T[go nkXkfos bx{ gqôB (nZm
ftZu'A gzi)
15
114
UNIT - 4
(T) wZXekbh ekft-XkoktK (d' ftZu'A fJe)
(i) ;{øh ekft-Xkok
(ii) r[owfs ekft-Xkok
(iii) feZ;k ekft-Xkok
(iv) tko ekft-Xkok 7
(n) ;fGnkuko ns/ gzikph ;fGnkuko (d' ftZu'A fJe)
(i) ;fGnkuko dh gfoGkôk, ;o{g ns/ bZSD
(ii) gzikph ;fGnkuko dh gfoGkôk, ;o{g s/ bZSD 8
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work comprising of a project
on:
• gzikph ;fGnkuko dh rb'pbkJhi/ôB ftu ;fEsh
• wBw'jB pktk d/ ihtB, ouBk ns/ :'rdkB pko/ fby'.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
x) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits).
xi) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
xii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1 gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; (1987) - gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ.
2 gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk;(1992) gzikph :{Bhtof;Nh, gfNnkbk.
3 wXekb dh u'DthA gzikph eftsk-;zgK vkH gqhsw f;zx(2000)-gpbhe/ôB
fpT{o',
uzvhrVQ
4 gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; - vkH jfoGiB f;zx Gkôk ftGkr (1972), gfNnkbk
5 ;Zs fprkB/ - niw/o f;zx n"by (2004), b'erhs gqekôB, u"Ehtko
6 izrBkwk f;zxK s/ cozrhnK- ;zgkH feogkb f;zx e;/b(2001) Gkôk ftGkr,
gfNnkbk
9 ;'jDh c÷b ôkj-vkH fsqb'e f;zx nkBzd-(1987)gpbhe/ôB fpT{o' gfNnkbk
10 ebkw p[bQ/ ôkj-;zgkH gq'L gqhsw f;zx(2001), gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gfNnkbk
11 p[bQ/ ôkj nkb'uBkswe nfXn?B- ekbk f;zx p/dh(2001)- gpbhe/ôB fpT{o'
gfNnkbk
12 ekdo:ko- r[btzs f;zx-(2002)gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gfNnkbk
115
4. HISTORY
BABED-HISO42
HISTORY OF THE PUNJAB, 1469-1966 A.D.
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• explain the contributions of Guru Nanak Dev, Guru Angad, Guru Amar Das, Guru Ram Das,
Guru Arjun Dev, Guru Hargobind, Guru Teg Bahadur and Guru Gobind Singh.
• analyze various socio- religious reform movements.
• explain Ranjit Singh's empire and its relationship with the British and significant development
that occurred during medieval period.
• analyze phases of freedom struggle and developments that occurred after independence.
Course content
Unit-I
Guru Nanak Dev: life and teachings of Guru Nanak; concept of langar; sangat; guru gaddi; his
views on position of women
Expansion and consolidation of Sikhism: contribution of Guru Angad; Guru Amar Das and
Guru Ram Das
Guru Arjun Dev: his contribution to the Panth; compilation of the Adi Grantb; causes and
significance of the martyrdom of Guru Arjun Dev
Unit-II
Development of Sikhism: Guru Hargobind's new policy and its justification; martyrdom of Guru
Tegh Bahadur and its significance
Creation of the Khalsa: circumstances leading to the creation of Khalsa and its significance; the
new injunctions and symbols of the Khalsa; post Khalsa activities of Guru Gobind Singh
Banda Singh Bahadur: establishment of independent rule; his achievements;
Socio-economic transformation
Unit-III
Punjab under Ranjit Singh: civil & military administration; land revenue system; Anglo-Sikh
relations upto 1839
British Rule: circumstances leading to the annexation of the Punjab; British administrative
structure
Socio-religious reform movements: Namdharis; Singh Sabha; Arya Samaj
Unit-IV
The phases of freedom struggle: agitation of 1907; the Ghadar movement; the Jallianwala Bagh;
the Gurudwara reform movement; circumstances leading to the partition of the Punjab
Developments after independence: rehabilitation and resettlement after partition; Punjabi suba
movement; the reorganisation act of 1966; agrarian changes with special reference to the Green
revolution
Map:
a) Important historical places - Amritsar, Goindwal, Anandpur Sahib, Chamkaur Sahib,
Kiratpur, Kartarpur, Ponta Sahib, Sirhind, Muktsar, Taran Taran, Lahore, Machhiwara,
Ropar and Kapurthala
b) Battles of Banda Bahadur
c) Ranjit Singh's Kingdom
116
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work
comprising:
• visit to an important historical place of Punjab and study historical development of that place
through primary and secondary sources.
• prepare a note of important contribution of one of the historical place in the freedom struggle
of India.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question shall
be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of ten
short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Chopra P.N., Puri, B.N., & Das, M.N.( 1974), A Social, Cultural & Economic History of
India. Vol.II. Macmillan India Limited, New Delhi.
2) Grewal, J.S. (1990),The Sikhs of the Punjab. The New Cambridge History of India, Orient
Longman, Hyderabad.
3) Singh, F. (1972), A History of the Sikhs Vol. III. Punjabi University, Patiala.
4) Singh, K. (1990), History and Culture of the Punjab, Part -II (Medieval Period). Publication
Bureau, Punjabi University, Patiala, (3rd edn.).
5) Singh,K. (1991), A History of the Sikhs. Vol. I. 1469-1839, Oxford University Press, New
Delhi.
5. POLITICAL SCIENCE
BABED-POLO42
INDIAN POLITICS
Marks (Credits)
117
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• explain the party system in India, understanding national political parties, their ideologies,
organizations and electoral performances.
• analyze the working of the Election Commission.
• discuss the meaning of caste, its difference with polity, role of caste in election.
• explain the meaning of religion and its relationship with politics, impact of
religion, region and language on politics.
• describe the meaning and definitions of foreign policy, India’s policy of Non-Alignment.
Course content
Unit-I
Nature of party system in India: a critical evaluation
National political parties (Indian National Congress, BJP, CPI, CPI (M), BSP):Their organization,
ideologies and electoral performance
Regional political parties: organization, ideologies and electoral. Performance of Shiromini Akali
Dal and National conference
Pressure groups in Indian politics
Unit-II
The Election commission: formation, functions and role
Voting behaviour: changing voting patterns and role of education
Unit-III
Emerging trends in Indian politics
Role of:
Caste
Religion
Language
Regionalism
Unit-IV
Basic principles and determinants of Indian foreign policy
Policy of Non-Alignment: a critical appraisal
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work
comprising of a project:
• seminar/ discussion on organization and functioning (role of the political parties).
• trace the role of local prominent political party and its contribution towards social upliftment.
• students in teams of 4-5 students may be assigned projects to study trends in politics of local
areas and study role of caste ( one group), religion ( another group), language (another group)
regionalism (another group)
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
iv) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
118
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
v) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
vi) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
21) Austin,G.(1966), The Indian Constitution: Corner Stone of a Nation. Oxford University
Press, New Delhi.
22) Austin,G.(1999), Working a Democratic Constitution: A History of the Indian
Experience. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
23) Basu,D.D.(1994), An Introduction to the Constitution of India. Prentice Hall, New Delhi.
24) Bhambri,C.P.(1997), The Indian State Fifty Years. Shipra Publications, New Delhi.
25) Brass, P.(1990), Politics of India since Independence. Orient Longman, Hyderabad.
26) Brass,P. (1985),Caste, Faction and Party in Indian Politics. Vol. II: Election Studies.
Chanakya Publications, New Delhi.
27) Brass,P.(1995),Ethnic Groups and the State. Croom Helm, London.
28) Brass,P.(1974), Language, Religion and Politics in North India. Cambridge University
Press, London.
29) Chatterjee, P. (1999), State and Politics in India. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
30) Fadia,B.L.(1984), State Politics in India. Vol. II. Radiant Publishers, New Delhi.
31) Frankel,F.R.(2005), India's Political Economy 1947-2004: The Gradual Revolution.
Oxford University Press,New Delhi.
32) Hasan,Z., Sridharan. E.& Sudarshan, R.(2004), India's Living Constitution: Ideas,
Practices, Controversies. Penn Anent Black, New Delhi.
33) Hasan, Z.(2002), Parties and Party Politics in India. Oxford University Press, New
Delhi.
34) Iqbal, N.(1967), State Politics in India. Meenakshi Parkashan, Meerut.
35) Jayal, N.G.(2001), Democracy in India. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
36) Kothari,R.(1988), State Against Democracy: In Search of Human Governance. Ajanta
Publishers, New Delhi.
37) Kumari,R.(1967), Politics in India. Orient Longman Bombay, Asia Publishing House,
New Delhi.
38) Noorani, A.G.(2000), Constitutional Questions in India. Oxford University Press, New
Delhi.
39) Pylee,M.V.(1977), Constitutional Government in India. Asia Publishing House,
Bombay.
40) Pylee,M.V.(1998), An Introduction to the Constitution of India. Vikas Publishers, New
Delhi.
41) Venna,S.P. & Bhambri, C.P. (1967), Election and Politics Consciousness in India.
Meenakshi Parkshan, Meerut.
119
6. ECONOMICS
BABED-ECOO42
PUBLIC FINANCE AND INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• explain the concept of public finance, sources of revenue and expenditure of the government.
• discuss the concept of public debt , deficit financing , need of deficit financing.
• describe concept of international trade and impact of WTO.
• explain the balance of payment and rate of exchange.
Course content
Unit-I
120
Introduction to public finance: nature, scope and its importance. Public expenditure: principles
of public finance (maximum social advantage), effects of public expenditure on production and
distribution, causes for the recent growth of public expenditure in India. Taxation: classification and
canons, characteristics of a good taxation system
Unit-II
Public debt: Its types and role, burden and methods of redemption of public debt Deficit
financing: objectives and limitations
Incidence and impact of taxation: demand and supply theory
Taxable capacity: absolute and relative capacity, determinants of taxable capacity
Unit-III
Pure theory of international trade: Classical, Heckscher and Ohlin theories; Principles of
reciprocal demand and terms of trade
Commercial policy: free trade v/s. protection, rationale of protectionist policy in less developed areas,
impact of W.T.O. on less developed countries
Unit-IV
Theory of balance of payments and exchange rate: meaning, concepts and components of
balance of payments
Rate of exchange: meaning and its determination, fixed v/s flexible rate of exchange and
purchasing power parity theory. IMF and IBRD: objectives, working and achievements
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work
comprising of a project:
• study of free trade policy and exploring commodities which come under free trade and
protection and kind of protectionist policy in less developed area.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question shall
be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of ten
short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Bhatia, H.L. (2008), Public Finance. Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi.
2) Dhar, P.H. (2007), Indian Economy and its Growing Dimensions. Kalyani Publishers, New
Delhi.
3) Jain, T.R. (2008), International Trade and Public Finance. V.K. Publications, New Delhi.
4) Kindleberger, C.P.(1987), International Economics. Richard Irwin Homewood, Illinois,
Indian Edition. All India Traveller Booksellers (Regd.), New Delhi.
121
5) Musgrave, A.R.& Musgrave, P.B.(2004), Public Finance in Theory and Practice. McGraw
Hills Publishing Company Ltd., New Delhi.
6) Soderston, B.O. & Geoffrey, R.(1994), International Economics. McMillan Press Ltd.,
London.
7. SOCIOLOGY
BABED-SOCO42
SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• describe Sociology of education; concept and meaning.
• explain social aims of education and its importance.
• analyze the development of education system intertwined with socio-cultural pattern of a
society.
• describe the role of various social groups such as family, state and community in the
development of education of marginalized section of the society.
Unit I
Introduction to Sociology of education: concept, meaning, definition, importance of education in
changing society. Theoretical perspectives of education
• Functional
• Conflict
Unit-II
Social aims of Education
• Nation building
• Cultural integration
• Economic growth
• Community development
122
• Social justice
Unit-III
Role of Family, state and community in education of
• girl child
• disadvantaged sections of society
• children with special needs
Unit-IV
Socio cultural factors in the development of education in India
National Educational Policy – failure and success
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work
comprising of a project:
• preparation of a scrap book ( people who were able to achieve high status in society
due to education in spite of poor background.
• social reformers who fought against caste discrimination
or social reformers who worked for the welfare of women.
• awareness campaign in slum area about relevance of
education.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question shall
be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of ten
short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1. Bendix, R. & Lipset, S.M. (1974), Class, Status & Power: Social Stratification in Perspective.
Routledge & Kegan Paul, London.
2. Collins, R. (1997), Sociological Theory. Rawat Publications, New Delhi.
3. Culvert, P. (1982), The Concept of Class. Hutchnson, London.
4. Ghurye, G.S.(1983), Caste, Class and Occupation. Popular Prakashan, Bombay.
5. Gupta, D. (1991), Social Stratification. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
6. Hughes, J.(1995), Understanding Classical Sociology. Marx, Weber & Durkheim. Sage
Publication, London.
7. Inkeles, A. (1980), Readings in Modem Sociology. Englewood Cliff, Prentice Hall.
8. Johnson, H. M.(1998), Sociology: A Systematic Introduction. Allied Publishers, New Delhi.
9. Madan, G.R.(1980),Samaj Shastra Ke Siddhant (Hindi). Sahitya Bhawan, Agra.
10. Madhurima (2005), Readings in Sociology. Part-II, New Academic Publishing House,
Jalandhar.
11. Richardson, C.J.(1977), Contemporary Social Mobility. Land Francies, Printer.
12. Sharma, K.L.(1980), Essays in Social Stratification. Rawat, Jaipur.
123
13. Tumin, M. (1987), Social Stratification. Prentice Hall, New Delhi.
14. Swift , D.F.(1969), The Sociology of Education. Routledge and Kegan Paul, London.
15. Jayaram, N (1990), Sociology of Education in India. Rawat, Jaipur.
16. Pandey, V.C.(2005), Sociology and Education in the Indian Context. Isha Publications, New
Delhi.
17. Brookover, W.(1955), Sociology of Education. American Book Co., New York.
18. Kaur, H.(2007), Development of Education in India. Commonwealth, New Delhi.
19. Chandra, S.S. & Sharma R.K.(2002), Sociology of Education. Atlantic, New Delhi.
8. GEOGRAPHY
BABED-GEOO42
GEOGRAPHY OF PUNJAB
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• explain the regional setting of Punjab state in detail through physical and political maps.
• analyze patterns of population and characteristics.
• state the distribution of major crops, industries and transport links in the state.
• analyze the intra regional variations in select aspects.
Course Content
Unit-I Location, evolution of the state, administrative decisions. Relief, drainage,
climate soils, vegetation, mineral and power resources
Unit-II Population: numbers, distribution, density, growth (birth rate, death rate &
migration, religious composition, urbanization
Main characteristics including green revolution, irrigation, main crops
(wheat, rice, cotton, sugarcane) and their distribution, agricultural marketing,
livestock and dairying, problems of agriculture
Unit-III Main characteristics: distribution pattern of major industries (cotton textile,
sugar, hosiery, engineering) industrial concentration, problem of
industrialization
Road, rail and air transport, interstate trade
Unit-IV Regional geography of Majiha, Doaba, Malwa & major characteristics of
each region
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work
comprising of a project:
124
• preparing a report on numbers, distribution, density, growth (birth rate, death rate & migration,
religious composition, urbanization of local rural and urban localities (group-wise).
• mapping rail and road links of important places in Malwa, Majha and Doaba regions of Punjab.
• mapping the regional geography of different regions of Punjab and Chandigarh and identify
distribution pattern of major industries in each region using primary and secondary sources (
team projects).
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1. Gupta, S.P.(2005), The Punjab: An Overview. Ess Pee Publications, Chandigarh.
2. Johnson, B.L.C. (1980), India: Resources and Development. Arnold Heinemann, London.
3. Khullar, D.R. (2000), India: A Comprehensive Geography. Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi.
4. Mankoo, D.S.(1977), Geography of Punjab. Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana.
5. Mavi, H.S. & Tiwana, D.S.(1993), Geography of Punjab. National Book Trust, New Delhi.
6. Singh, M. (1999), Geography of Punjab. Rashmeet Publications, Jalandhar.
7. Singh, R.L. (1971), India: A Regional Geography. National Geographical Society of India,
Varanasi.
125
9. MATHEMATICS
BABED-MATO42
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS, VECTOR CALCULUS AND MECHANICS
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester, the students will be able to:
• derive theorems related to differentiation and integration of transforms.
• solve partial diffenential equations with general and Charpits method.
• derive vector transformation , vector integration and related problems.
• explain vetocities and accelerations in its varietes as prescribed in the courses.
• derive motions on different places and different media.
.
UNIT I
Differentiation and integration of transforms, Convolution theorem, solution of integral
equations and systems of differential equations using the Laplace transformations
UNIT II
Paritial differential equations of the first order, Lagrange's solution, some special types of
equations which can be solved easily by methods other than the general method. Charpit's general
method of solution
UNIT III
Vector Calculus, Vector differentiation, Gradient, divergence and curl. Vector Integration,
theorems of Gauss, Green, Stokes and problems based on these
Statics, Analytical conditions of equilibrium of coplanar forces. Virtual work, Catenary
UNIT IV
Dynamics: velocities and accelerations along radial and transversal directions, and along
tangential and normal directions. Simple Harmonic motion, Elastic strings
Motion on smooth and rough plane curves, motion in a resisting medium. Motion of particles
of varying mass.Central Orbits, Kepler’s law of Motion
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of individualized work like:
• the teacher may familiarize the students with examples of course content.
• the teacher will give extensive practice in the mathematical skills.
126
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question shall
be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of ten
short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
References
1. Erwin, K.(1999), Advanced Engineering Mathematics. John Wiley &. Sons Inc., New York.
2. Murray, D.A.(1967), Introductory Course on Differential Equations. Onent Longman, India.
3. Forsyth, A.R. (1998), A Treatise on Differential Equations. Macmillan and Co. Ltd., London.
4. Sneddon, I.N.(1988), Elements of Partial Differential Equations. McGraw-Hill Book Company.
5. Hilderbrand, F.B. (1977), Advanced Calculus or Applications. Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd.,
New Delhi.
6. Ayres, F.(1972), Theory and Problems of Differential Equations. McGraw-Hill Book Company.
7. Bronson, R.(1973), Theory and Problems of Differential Equations. McGraw-Hill Book
Company.
8. Loney, S.L.(1978), Statics. Macmillan and Company, London.
9. Verma, R.S. (1988), A Text Book on Statics. Pothishala Pvt. Ltd., Allahabad.
10. Loney, S.L.(1956), An Elementary Treatise on the Dynamics of a Particle and of Rigid'
Bodies. Cambridge University Press.
11. Murrary R.S. (1997), Vector Analysis. Schaum Publishing Company, New York.
12. Saram, N. & Nigam,S.N.(1989),Introduction to Vector Analysis. Pothishala Pvt. Ltd.,
Allahabad.
13. Narayan, S. (1993), A Text Book of Vector Calculus. S. Chand & Co., New Delhi.
GENERAL PRACTICUM
BABED-SRPC42
SCHOOL RELATED PRACTICUM (100 MARKS)
CREDITS 5
127
• Prepare different types of test items (multiple, matching, alternative response, completion,
short answer) for a topic and validate them over a small group.
• Visit schools in small groups (4 to 5 students) and open a counselling cell to provide
information about their course.
• Evaluate a text book used in any one school subject from point of view of registers and styles
used in them.
BABED-LSTC42
LIFE SKILLS TRAINING (100 MARKS)
CREDITS 5
Two life skills will be taken up in this semester which must have a base of skill of decision making
and skill of problem solving (already done in previous semester)
• Skill of critical thinking
• Skill of self management
Training in these two skills will be imparted through suitable techniques and students will be made
aware of need of such training.
TUTORIALS
The students will be associated with one teacher, who will supervise individual progress on school
related practicum, improvement in life skills, sessional work of various subjects, general problems
related to academics and interaction among themselves etc. Also, the talent of individual students will
be explored and nurtured.
B.A.Hons. (Edu.) B.Ed.
SEMESTER V (Session 2011-12)
COURSE STRUCTURE FOR SEMESTER V
S.No NATURE SUBJECT CODE SUBJECT TITLE LECTURE TUTORIAL PRACTICAL CREDITS
1 COMPULSORY BABED-ENGC53 ENGLISH 5 0 0 5
128
2 ONE OF TWO BABED-PBIC53
BABED-HCPC53
PUNJABI
HISTORY & CULTURE
OF PUNJAB
5
5
0
0
0
0
5
5
3 & 4 TWO OF NINE BABED-ECOO53
BABED-ENGO53
BABED-GEOO53
BABED-HINO53
BABED-HISO53
BABED-MATO53
BABED-POLO53
BABED-PBIO53
BABED-SOCO53
ECONOMICS
ENGLISH
GEOGRAPHY
HINDI
HISTORY
MATHS
POLITICAL SCIENCE
PUNJABI
SOCIOLOGY
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5 & 6 COMPULSORY BABED-EDUC09
BABED-EDU10
TECHNOLOGICAL
BASES OF
EDUCATION AND
PEDAGOGY
SCHOOL
MANAGEMENT &
ADMINISTRATION
4
4
0
0
1
1
5
5
7 COMPULSORY BABED-SRPC53 SCHOOL RELATED
PRACTICUM
2 0 3
(IN FIELD)
5
8 COMPULSORY BABED-LSTC53 LIFE SKILLS TRAINING 4 0 1
(IN LIBRARY)
5
GRAND TOTAL
40
PAPER I: BABED-EDU09: TECHNOLOGICAL BASES OF EDUCATION AND PEDAGOGY
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
129
At the end of the semester, the students will be able to:
• define educational technology and discuss historical development of the concept.
• explain the concept, nature, phases, levels and models of teaching.
• discuss concept of teacher behaviour and use techniques of modifying teaching behavior.
• describe techniques of self instructions with emphasis on programmed learning.
• describe the concept of teaching models and basic structure of teaching models.
• identify the components of Glasers , Ausubel , Taba and Bruner models of teaching.
Course Content:
Unit I Educational technology: historical development, concept and types
Unit II Teaching: concept, nature, phases, operations and
levels. Modifying teaching behavior: simulation and micro
teaching
Unit III Evaluation: concept, characteristics, types and tools of evaluation. Evaluation in each
domain of Bloom’s taxonomy of behavioural outcomes
Unit IV Self instructions
Programmed learning: concept psychological rationale,
principles and styles
UnitV Models of teaching: concept: basic structure, concept attainment models(Glaser , Ausubel,
Taba, and Bruner)
Teaching Learning Experiences:
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations conducted by the teacher. The remaining portion will be covered in the
form of individualized sessional work which will include:
• demonstration of use of any model of teaching in their own class in simulated situation.
• preparing test items for any one class VI to X in any subject at various levels of Bloom’s
Taxonomy.
Evaluation Scheme:
The evaluation will be based on:
(i) Theory paper at the end of the session consisting of ten questions. The students will be
required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3 Credits).
(ii) Supervised sessional work will be based on project work, team presentations, individual term
papers and seminars (20 marks: 1 Credit)
(iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interaction etc.
(20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Bhushan, A. & Ahuja, M. (2003), Educational Technology. Second edition, Bawa
Publishers, Patiala.
2) Bigge, M.L. & Hunt, M. (1968), Psychological Foundations of Education. Harper and Row
Publishers, London.
3) Chauhan, S.S. (1998), A Textbook of Programmed Instruction. Sterling Publishers, New
Delhi.
4) Das R.C.( 1993), Educational Technology: A Basic Text. Sterling Publishers, New Delhi.
5) Unwin, D. & McAlease, R. (1978), The Encyclopedia of Educational Media,
Communications and Technology. Greenwood Press, West Port
6) Ahuja, M. (2007), Mastery Learning. Vivek Publishers, Meerut.
130
PAPER II: BABED-EDU10: SCHOOL MANAGEMENT & ADMINISTRATION
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After this semester the students will be able to:
• describe the concept of school organization and administration .
• explain nature, scope and essential facets of school organization
• enlist the fundamentals of leadership in educational organization
• analyze various factors affecting qualitative improvement
• explain the concept of organizational behaviour
131
Course Content
Unit I : School organization and administration: concept,
nature, scope
Unit II : Essential facets of school organization: Head of
institution: qualities and functions
Teacher: Qualities and functions, ethics and codes for teacher
Timetable: Importance, types and principles; discipline: basis, causes and remedial
measures
Unit III : Leadership in educational organizations: meaning,
nature, styles, traits and skills
Unit IV : Qualitative improvement factors: welfare services;
supervision and inspections; school records and
registers
Unit V : Organisational behaviour: motivation; job satisfaction;
relationships in organizational set-up; conflict
resolution
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations conducted by the teacher. The remaining portion will be covered in the
form of individualized sessional work which will include:
• visit a school and learn to maintain school records and registers.
• through open house discussion identify and list qualities of a teacher which make him
effective.
• survey a small group of schools and study the status of job satisfaction of secondary school
teachers in these schools.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
I. Theory paper at the end of the session consisting of ten questions. The students will
be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3 Credits).
II. Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers
and seminars (20 marks: 1 Credit)
III. Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Sodhi, T.S. & Suri, A. (2002), Management of School Education. Bawa Publications,
Patiala.
2) Sachdeva, M.S. (1992), A New Approach to School Management. Vinod Publications,
Educational Publishers, Ludhiana.
3) Educational Commission (1964-66), Govt. of India. New Delhi.
4) Govt. of India (1953), Report on Secondary Education.
5) Walia, J.S.(2001), Foundations of School Administration and Organization. Bright
Publishers, Jallandhar
PAPER III: BABED-ENGC53: ENGLISH (COMPULSORY)
Marks (Credits)
132
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives of Teaching English
After instructions, the students shall be able to :
• Make use of competence in all the four skills i.e. Listening, Speaking , Reading and Writing.
• Describe the structure of poem, story, drama, essay.
• Describe and use new pedagogic practices in the teaching of both language and literature.
Prescribed text
The Silent Song (2007)
COURSE CONTENT
Unit I (Poetry)
4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12 from the text The Silent Song.
Unit II (Prose)
The Merchant of Venice (2006 edition) by Shakespeare ed by Fletcher, Oxford University Press.
Unit III
Sense and sensibility by Jane Austin
Unit IV
1. Pair of words
2. Correction of sentences
3. Use of Idioms into sentences
Unit V
Essay writing (Social and Current topics)
Précis writing (250 to 300 words)
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining 20% will be covered in the form of internal assessment based on
terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions, etc.
Evaluation Scheme
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions i.e. two questions from each unit with internal
choice. The students will be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (80 marks: 4
Credits).
ii) Internal assessment will be based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested readings
133
1. Martin Hewings (2007) Advanced English Grammar ,Cambridge University Press India Ltd,
New Delhi.
2. Venugopal. K. Rao (2007) Peculiar English, Neelakamal Publications, New Delhi
3. Goodwyn Andrew and Branson Jane (2005), Teaching English : A Hand Book for Primary
and Secondary School Teachers , Rougtledgehalmer Publisher.
4. Gupta A and Sawhney ( 2008) Modern Essay A.P.H. publishing House, New Delhi.
5. Sethi M ( 2008) Handbook of Standard English and usage, Vocabulary and Grammar, PHI
Learning Pvt Ltd, New Delhi.
PAPER IV: BABED-PBIC53: PUNJABI (COMPULSORY)
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
gzikph bk÷wh
;w?;No
Objectives
fJ; g/go dk T[d/ô ftfdnkoEhnK B{z wZXekbhB gzikph ekftXkok s'a ikD{
eotkT[Dk j?. Bktb d/ rfjB nfXn?B dh o[uh g?dk eoBk j?. wZXekbh ;kfjsekoK
d/ :'rdkB B{z fBoXkfos eoBk j?. ftukoK d/ soshp pZX gqrNkt/ B{z T[GkoBk
j?. gzikph Gkôk ;zpzXh ft;Ekog{ote ;wM g?dk eoBk j?.
gkmeqw
1H wZXekbhB gzikph ekft-Xkok, ;zgkH vkH nso f;zx, gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gzikp
:{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ
2H u'Dt/A b/y, fgzq;hgb s/ik f;zx, gzikph ;kfjs gqekôB, nzfwqs;o
3H bx{ gqôB
134
4H ftnkeoD
UNIT - 1
(T) wZXekbhB gzikph ekft-Xkok ftZu'A gq;zr ;fjs ftnkfynk (d' ftZu'A fJe)
8
(n) wZXekbhB gzikph ekft-Xkok ftZu'A fBoXkos fe;/ fJe eth dk ihtB, ouBk
ns/ :'rdkB 8
UNIT - 2
eftsk dk e/Adoh Gkt iK ;ko (fszB ftZu'A fJe)
16
UNIT - 3
u'Dt/A b/y (gfjb/ b/yK ftZu'A) fe;/ fJe b/y dk ;ko (fszBK ftZu'A fJZe)
16
UNIT - 4
(T) wZXekbhB gzikph ekft-Xkok ns/ u'Dt/A b/y (gfjb/ S/ b/yK ftZu'A) bx{
gqôB (S/ ftZu'A uko)
2x4=8
(n) wZXekbhB gzikph ekft-Xkok ftZu'A n"y/ ôpdK d/ noE (d;K ftZu'A nZm) 8
UNIT - 5
(T) pj[-noEe ôpdK dh tkeK ftZu'A tos'A 8
(n) ôpd-i[ZNK d/ noEK dk tkeK d[nkok nzso ;gZôN eoBk 8
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of internal
assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions, etc. (20 %)
Evaluation Scheme
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions i.e. two questions from each unit with internal
choice. The students will be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (80 marks: 4
Credits).
ii) Internal assessment will be based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Books:
1. gzikph Gkôk fbgh ns/ ftnkeoB - vkH ôod/t f;zx frZb(2006) b'e rhs
gqekôB, b[fXnkDk.
2. gzikph nfXn?B s/ nfXnkgB d/ w[Yb/ ;zebg - ihs f;zx i'ôh(1999), tko;
ôkj ckT{Av/ôB nzfwqs;o
3. gzikph ;kfjs dh T[sgsh s/ ftek; - gofwzdo f;zx, feogkb f;zx
e;/b(1968), bkj"o p[Ze ôkg b[fXnkDk
4. gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; - (nkX[fBe ekb 1901 s'A 1995 sZe)-vka i;ftzdo
f;zx, vka wkB f;zx YhAv;k(1997), gpbhe/ôB fpU[o', gzikph :{Bha
gfNnkbk
135
5. gzikph ftnkeoD-p{Nk f;zx prV, tko; ôkj ckT{Av/ôB, nzfwqs;o.
PAPER IV: BABED-HCPC53: HISTORY AND CULTURE OF PUNJAB
(COMPULSORY)
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester students will be able to
• explain the concepts like colonialism and nationalism in the context of history and culture of
Punjab in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
• describe the various movements of national importance.
Unit-I
Causes and consequences of the first anglo-sikh war
Annexation of the Punjab with special reference to the causes and consequences of the second
anglo–sikh war
Unit II
Main features of the early British administration
British policy towards the army, agriculture, industry, trade and commerce
Unit III
Spread of modern education at primary, secondary and higher levels
The foundation, program and impact of the social religious reform movements
Arya samaj , Singh sabhas , Anjumans
Unit-IV
Contribution to the growth of political consciousness by the Namdhari movement, uprising of 1907
and Gaddar movement
Contribution to the freedom struggle with special reference to the Gurdwara reform movement,
Jallianwala Bagh, Bhagat Singh, Non-cooperation and Civil disobedience
Teaching Learning Experiences
136
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of internal assessment based on terminal
examinations, attendance, classroom interactions, etc. (20 %)
Evaluation Scheme
In all, nine questions will be set. Each question will carry 16 marks.
viii. First question shall be short answer type containing 12 short questions spread
over the whole syllabus. Candidates will attempt 8 out of the 12 questions in
about 25 to 30 words each. It shall carry 16 marks and shall be compulsory.
Rest of the paper shall contain four units. Each unit shall have two essay type
questions and the candidate shall attempt one question from each unit. Each
essay type question will be set on half of the topics and not on a single subtopic
(80 marks: 4 Credits).
ii) Internal assessment based on terminal examination attendance, classroom
interaction etc. (20 marks : 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1. Singh, F. (1987), History and Culture of the Punjab. Part II, Publication Bureau, Punjabi
University, Patiala.
2. Singh, F. (1974), Freedom Struggle in the Punjab. Publication Bureau, Punjabi University,
Patiala.
3. Grewal, J.S. (2005), The Sikhs of the Punjab, New Cambridge House.New Delhi
4. Singh,K. (1991), A History of the Sikhs. Vol. II (1839-1998), Oxford University Press, Delhi.
5. Satya, M. R. (1978), Heroic Tradition in the Punjab(1900-1947). Punjabi University, Patiala.
6. Chopra, P.N.& Das, M.N. (1974), A Social, Cultural & Economic History of India. Vol.III,
Macmillan India,
7. Yadav, K.C. (1991), Haryana Aitihasik Simhavalokan (Hindi). Haryana Sahitya Akademy,
Chandigarh,
8. Grewal, J.S.(2004), Social and Cultural History of Punjab: Prehistoric, Ancient and Early
Medieval. Foundation Books Pvt Ltd Cambridge House, New Delhi
9. Gupta, K.K. (2007), History and Culture of Punjab. Mohindra Publishing House, Chandigarh.
10. Rai, R. (2007), History and Culture of the Punjab. New Academic Publisher, Jalandhar
11. Johar, R.S. (1983), Studies in Punjabi Economy. GNDU Publication, Amritsar.
(C) OPTIONAL SUBJECTS (PAPER V and VI)
The student is required to take up two elective/optional subjects from the following nine
subjects. Each paper will be of 100 marks.
1) English
2) Hindi
3) Punjabi
4) History
5) Political Science
6) Economics
7) Sociology
8) Geography
9) Mathematics
137
1. ENGLISH (Elective)
BABED-ENGO53
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives of Teaching English
At the end of semester, the students will be able to:
• make use of competence in all the four skills i.e. listening, speaking , reading and writing.
• describe implications of teaching/learning language through literature.
• develop the power of imagination through literature.
Unit I
Literary terms and definitions
Tragedy, comedy, tragic-comedy, comedy of humors, melodrama, romantic comedy, miracle and
morality plays, farce, historical play, closet drama, drama of ideas, revenge tragedy, theatre of
absurd, modernism, dramatic irony
Unit II
A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
Unit III
Text No. 1 – Sonnet 55 (William Shakespeare )
Text No. 2 – The Canonization ( John Donne )
Text No. 3 – To His Coy Mistress (Andrew Marvell )
Text No. 4 – Mac Flecknoe ( John Dryden )
Text No. 5 – Portrait of Atticus ( Alexander Pope )
Text No. 6 – The Chimney Sweeper ( William Blake )
Text No. 7 - Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood ( William
Wordsworth )
Text No. 8 – Ode to the West Wind ( Percy Bysshe Shelley )
Text No. 9 – To Autumn ( John Keats )
Text No. 10 – The Lady of Shalott ( Alfred, Lord Tennyson )
Text No. 11 – Porphyria’s Lover ( Robert Browning )
Text No. 12 – Dover Beach (Matthew Arnold )
Text No. 13 – One’s – Self I Sing (Walt Whitman )
Text No. 14 - Success is Counted Sweetest ( Emily Dickinson )
Text No. 15 - A Prayer for my Daughter ( W.B. Yeats )
Text No 16 – Acquainted with the Night ( Robert Frost )
From the book Anthology of poetry and prose from Renaissance to Modern edited by Mutatkar and
Sharma
Unit IV
Précis writing
Applied Grammar
Word formation and their use in sentences
Form noun from ____
Form adjective from ______
Form verb from ______
Teaching Learning Experiences
138
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations conducted by the teacher. The remaining portion will be covered in the
form of individualized sessional work which will include:
• preparation of a report on the writings of William Shakespeare.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
v) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question shall
be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of ten
short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units
of the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit.
(12x4 = 48 marks).
vi) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
vii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1. Tickoo,C. & Kumar,J.S .(2000), Writing with a purpose. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
2. Fifteen Poets. (1988), Oxford University Press India. Calcutta.
3. Hewings, M.(2007), Advanced English Grammar. Cambridge University Press India Ltd, New
Delhi.
4. Singh, V.R.(2009), The Written Word. Oxford University Press, New Delhi
5. Mutatkar & Sharma (2010), Anthology of Poetry and Prose from Renaissance to Modern.
MacMillan Publishers, New Delhi.
6. Shakespeare, W. (2008), A Midsummer Night's Dream. UBS Publishers, New Delhi.
7. Abrams, M.H. (2007), A Glossary of Literary Terms. Thomson Wadsworth, New Delhi.
8. Cuddon, J.A. (1998), The Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory. Penguin
Books India (P) Ltd., New Delhi.
2. HINDI (ELECTIVE)
BABED-HINO53
Marks (Credits)
139
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
vè;;u izfØ;k ds lekiu ds mijkUr fo|kFkhZ %&
• jke/kjh flag fnudj ds jf'kejFkh laf{kIr esa ls fn, x, pkj dkO;k'kksa ds lanHkZ esa O;k[;k
fy[ksaxs A
• bUgha dkO;k'kksa ij vk/kfjr vkykspukRed iz'uksa ds mÙkj fy[ksaxs A
• x| izokg ij vk/kfjr fn, x, iz'uksa dh vkykspuk fy[ksaxs A
• bUgha fn, x, x|ksa ds lUnHkZ esa O;k[;k de ls de rhu fy[ksaxs A
• jf'kejFkh laf{kIr rFkk x| izokg ij vk/kfjr y?kq iz'uksa ds mÙkj nsaxs A
• miU;kl] dgkuh] ukVd] fucU/] vkRedFkk] thouh] o lalej’k js[kk fp=k fo/kvksa ij vk/kfjr
rqyukRed iz'uksa ds mÙkj fy[ksaxs A
• iwjh ikB; oLrq esa ls nl oLrq fu"B iz'uksa ds mÙkj fy[ksaxs A
Course Content
Unit I
jke/kjh flag fnudj
Unit II
x| izokg
lEiknd jke [ksykou jk;] fl;kjke frokjh] fodkl ifCyds'ku] ubZ fnYyhA
dsoy fuEufyf[kr ikB fu/kZfjr gSa %&
lkfgR; D;k gS (';kelqanj nkl)] Øks/ (jkepUnz 'kqDy)] Jherh egknsoh oekZ (jkedqekj oekZ)]
ck.kHkV~V% thouh vkSj dyk (ufyu foykspu)] Jh jke ujs'k f=kikBh (MkWñ in~eflag 'kekZ
^^deys'k**)] vyksihnhu (egknsoh oekZ)] baXySaM% efxj dkSu lk (MkWñ /eZohj Hkkjrh)]
cw<+h dkdh (izsepUnz)] oklkZ dh Mk;jh (MkWñ jke/kjh flag fnudj)] fuokZlu vkSj fiz;k uhyd.Bh
(dqcsjukFk jk;)A
Unit III
bl [k.M esa pkj y?kq&mÙkjkis{kh iz'u djus gksaxsA dqy vkB iz'u iwNs tk;asxsA izR;sd mÙkj
dh 'kCn lhek 50 gksxhA ;s iz'u bl i=k ds iwoksZDr nks [k.Mksa (jf'ejFkh ,oa x| izokg) ij vk/kfjr
gksaxsA
Unit IV
fgUnh lkfgR; dk bfrgkl
dsoy fuEufyf[kr x| fo/kvksa dk mn~Hko vkSj fodkl % miU;kl] dgkuh] ukVd] fucU/] vkRedFkk] thouh]
laLej.k js[kkfp=kA
bu x|&fo/kvksa esa ls ds de ls de pkj iz'u iwNs tk;saxs] Nk=kksa dks dsoy nks djus gksaxsA
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations conducted by the teacher. The remaining portion will be covered in the
form of individualized sessional work which will include:
1- fdlh ,d lkekftd fo"k; ij foKkiu dk :i rS;kj djsaA
2- fdlh egku fgUnh dfo dh thouh rFkk vkRedFkk fy[ksaA
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition
140
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1- prqosZnh jkts'ojizlkn] (2008) fgUnh O;kdj.k midkj izdk'ku] vkxjkA
2- lkguh ,l-ch] 'kekZ vkj- ih (2007) loksZÙke fgUNh O;kdj.k] lkguh izdk'ku] vkxjkA
3- jktkjke dYiuk (2009) fuca/ cks/] LisDVªe cqDl izk- fy-] fnYyhA
4- xqIr x.kifrpUnz (2008)] lkfgfR;d fuca/] yksdHkkjrh izdk'ku] bykgcknA
5- xqykVh ;'k (2007)] c`gr~ lkfgfR;d fucU/] lw;ZHkkjrh izdk'ku] fnYyhA
6- uxsUnz gjn;ky (2009) fgUnh lkfgR; dk bfrgkl] e;wj isijcSDl] uks;M+kA
3. PUNJABI (ELECTIVE)
BABED-PBIO53
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
141
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
gzikph fJb?efNt
Objectives
fJ; g/go dk wzst ftfdnkoEhnK B{z nkX[fBe gzikph eftsk pko/ ft;fsqs
ikDkeoh d/Dk j?. fBpzX ftXk fsZyk eoBk j?. gzikph ;kfjs d/ fJfsjk; d/
nkX[fBe ekb d/ sZEK B{z ftukoBk j?. ;kfjs d/ nkX[fBe o{gK s'A ikD{
eotkT[Dk j?. ;kfjs ftôb/ôD ;zpzXh ftfdnkoEhnK dh o[uh tXkT[D bJh ;kfjse
tkdK s'A ikD{ eotkT[Dk j?.
gkmeqw
1H ;[o ;zt/dBk, vkH ;fszdo f;zx, nkX[fBe gzikph eftsk (1900 JhH s'A 2000
JhH)
gpbhe/ôB, fpT{o', gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ
2H ohMK s/ ow÷K (gfjb/ gzi b/y), vkH r[ouoB f;zx, gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gzikp
:{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ
3H bx{ gqôB
4H ;kfjse tkd
Course Contents
UNIT - 1
;[o ;zt/dBkL
(i) gq;zr ;fjs ftnkfynk (d' ftZu'A fJe) 6
(ii) eftsk dk e/Adoh Gkt dZ; e/ ;ko (d' ftZu'A fJe) 9
UNIT - 2
ohMK s/ ow÷KL
(i) fBpzX ftôk t;s{ (d' ftZu'A fJe) 7
(ii) ;kfjse nkb'uBk (d' ftZu'A fJe) 8
UNIT - 3
;[o ;zt/dBk ns/ ohMK s/ ow÷K (gfjb/ gzi fBpzX) T[go nkXkfos bx{ gqôB (nZm
ftZu'A gzi)
15
UNIT - 4
;kfjse tkdL (d' ftZu'A fJe)
(i) ;BksBtkd
(ii) o'wK;tkd
(iii) gqrshtkd 15
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations conducted by the teacher. The remaining portion will be covered in the
form of individualized sessional work which will include:
• toswkB ftZu gzikph Gkôk dh ;fEsh pko/ uouk.
• eh ;[fszdo f;zx B{o nb'ue j? iK eth uouk eo'<
142
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 Credits).
xiii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
xiv) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Books
1 ethnK dhnK eftsktK T[jBK d/ ekft-;zrqfjnK ftZu'A b?DhnK jB.
2 ohMK s/ ow÷K - ;zgkH vkH r[ouoB f;zx, gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', uzvhrVQ
1991
3 gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; - gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ
4 gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; - gzikph :{Bhtof;Nh, gfNnkbk
5 gzikph ;kfjs dh T[sgZsh s/ ftek; - gofwzdo f;zx, feogkb f;zx
e;/b - bkj"o p[Ze ôkg, b[fXnkDk
6 gzikph nfXn?B d/ w[Yb/ ;zebg - ihs f;zx i'ôh, tko; ôkj
ckT{Av/ôB, nzfwqs;o - 1999
4. HISTORY
BABED-HISO53
WORLD HISTORY 1500-1870 A.D.
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
143
After the completion of the semester, students will be able to
• explain the emergence of modern Europe by studying at world history.
• describe the rise of new culture as seen in decline of feudealism and rise of new culture as
seen in decline of feudalism and rise of Renaisssances and reformation
• discuss growth of national political territories.
Course content;
Unit-I
The Renaissance and reformation: decline of Feudalism; factors for the growth of Renaissance
and its effects in Europe; Martin Luther’s protestant reformation; Counter reformation
Rise of Absolute state: France and Russia
Rise of Parliamentary government: the glorious revolution and its effects
Unit-II
The American revolution: its social, political and economic causes; its consequences
The French revolution: causes and impact of the French revolution
Napoleon Bonapart: reforms of Napoleon Bonapart; his continental system
Unit -III
Congress of Vienna (1815): motives, working, principles, provisions and significance of Congress
of Vienna
The Industrial era: Industrial revolution (1750-1850); causes for its origins in England; New
inventions; spread to Europe; impact on society
Eastern Question: Greek war of Independence; Mehmat Ali and Egypt; Crimean war
Unit -IV
Unification of Italy: different stages in unification of Italy; role of Mazzini, Cavour and Garibaldi
Unification of Germany: rise of nationalism and role of Bismarck in the unification of Germany
Map
a) Important historical places-Paris, London, Rome, Berlin, Frankfurt, Vienna, Waterloo and
Moscow
b) Unification of Germany
c) Unification of Italy
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations conducted by the teacher. The remaining portion will be covered in the
form of individualized sessional work which will include:
• preparation of a note on important contribution of Nepolean in French revolution.
• preparation of a report on American revolution.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
144
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Chandra, B. (1989), India’s Struggle for Independence. Penguin Books, Viking, India.
2) Chandra, S. (2008), Medivial India. Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi.
3) Thapar, R. (2002), The Penguin History of Early India (to AD 1300). Penguin Books, New
Delhi.
4) Geoffery (2005),Times Compact History of the World. Parker Publications, New Hyde
Park, New York.
5) Geoffery(2001),Short History Of The World,Parker Publications, Parker Publications, New
Hyde Park, New York.
6) Koch, W.H. (1989), Origin of First World War. Palgrave Publishers, United Kingdom.
7) Ketelbay, C.D.M. (2005), Short History of Europe. Surjit Publishers, New Delhi.
5. POLITICAL SCIENCE
BABED-POLO53
COMPARATIVE POLITICAL SYSTEMS (UK AND USA)
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After this semester, the students will be able to:
• explain the meaning of comparative government and politics.
• describe the main features of judicial organization in Britain.
• explain the concept of rule of law in UK.
• describe the salient features of the American political system;
• describe the features, organization and working of American party system.
Course content
Unit-I: Theoretical framework
145
Meaning and scope of comparative government and politics
Comparative method
Unit –II: U.K.
The British political traditions
Parliamentary government, Monarchy, Cabinet, Parliament
Judicial system and rule of law
Unit –III: U.S.A.
Evolution of American political system, war of independence, framing of the constitution, bill of
rights
The constitutional framework
Federal system
Unit IV:
Political parties and interest groups of U.K
Political parties and interest groups of U.S.A
Teaching Learning Experiences;
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations conducted by the teacher. The remaining portion will be covered in the
form of individualized sessional work which will include
• comparing political institutions ( US and UK ).
• web usability.
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Books Recommended
1) Johari, J.C. (1979), Major Modern Political Systems. Vishal Publication, Delhi.
2) Johri, J.C. (1978), Comparative Politics. Sterling Publishers, New Delhi.
3) Kapoor, A.C. (1950), Select Constitutions. S. Chand and Company, New Delhi.
4) Khanna, V.N. (1981), Comparative Study of Government and Politics. S. Chand and
Comp, New Delhi.
5) Vishnu, B. (1983), World Constitutions. Sterling Publisher, New Delhi.
6) Bombwall, K.R. (1976), Major Contemporary Constitutional Systems. Modern Publication,
Ambala Cantt.
7) Deol, H.S. (1990), Adhunik Sarkrana. Publication Bureau, Punjabi University, Patiala.
8) Andrew, H. (1997), Politics. Macmillan Palgrave, New York,
9) Mackintosh (1987), The Government in the United States. Any edition, New Delhi.
10) Johnson, C.O. (1991), Government in the United States. New Delhi.
11) Herman, F. (1963), Theory and Practice of Modern Government. Theuen and Comp.,
London.
12) Hague and Harrop (2001), Comparative Government and Politics. Palgrave, New York.
146
6. ECONOMICS
BABED-ECOO53
ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester the students will be able to
• differentiate between economic growth and economic development.
• analyze the various model and strategies of economic growth.
• describe the concept of economic development.
• state the meaning of sustain development and how it is achieved.
Course content;
Unit –I
Economic growth and development. Main features of an underdeveloped economy.
Determinants of economics development. Capital formation: Meaning, importance, sources.
Disguised unemployment as a source of capital formation in under developed countries: Nurbse’s
Law, Lewis vision
Unit -II
147
Theories and models of economic growth from under development towards development; Rostow
theory of stages of growth, Critical minimum effort thesis, Theory of Big Push
Unit –III
Models and strategies of growth and economic development, Classical theory of economic
development, Harrod Domer model of economic growth ; one sector Neo Classical model of growth.
Strategies of economic development, balanced Vs unbalanced growth. Inward and outward looking
growth stratergies. Export promotion and import substitution strategy
Unit -IV
Planning and sustainable development: need, objectives, strategies and problems of
planning, price mechanism and planning
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations conducted by the teacher. The remaining portion will be covered in the
form of individualized sessional work which will include:
• preparation of a report on any one model of economic growth and development.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question shall
be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of ten
short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project Work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit)).
Books Recommended
1) Jain, T.R. (2007), Development Problem and Policies. V.K. Publications. New Delhi.
2) Meier, G.M.(1995), Leading Issues in Economic Development. Oxford University Press,
New York.
3) Rostow, W.W. (1992), Stages of Economic Growth. Cambridge University Press.
4) Higgins, B.(1994). Economic Development: Principles, Problems and Policies. Universal
Book Stall, New Delhi.
5) Meier, G.M. & Ranch, J.E. (1998), Leading issues in Economic Development. Seventh
Edition, Oxford University Press.
6) Nurkse, R. (1990), Problems of Capital Formation in Underdeveloped Countries. Oxford
University Press.
7) Michael, T. (2001), Economic Development in the Third World. Orient Longman, London.
148
7. SOCIOLOGY
BABED-SOCO53
SOCIETY IN INDIA
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of this semester, the students will be able to
• analyze the diversified Indian society by focusing on social, political and economic structure
(institution) of various parts of the society i.e. tribal , rural and urban.
• explain the problems and challenges of disadvantanges sections of the Indian society.
Unit –I
Tribal: meaning and characteristics, growth and distribution, institutional features- family,
marriage, economy and informal education
Unit-II
Rural: meaning and characteristics, institutional features: family, marriage (rules of mate
selection), economy, rural development, panchyat (features and functions): with reference to 73rd
amendment. Rural educational institutions
Unit –III
Urban: meaning and characteristics, institutional features; (urban family: features), economy
(occupational diversity), urbanization and educational growth
Unit –IV
Under privileged disabilities and present status of groups
(a) Scheduled castes (SC)
149
(b) Women
Role of education in upliftment of SC and women
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations conducted by the teacher. The remaining portion will be covered in the
form of individualized sessional work which will include:
• visit to an old age home or visit to a school in slum area or visit to a village school.
• preparation of project report on renowned women either at
educational level or economic level or political level or social
welfare.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Desai, A.R. (1969), Rural Sociology in India. Popular Publications, Bombay.
2) Dube, S.C. (1977), India Since Independence, Social Report on India, 1947-1972. Vikas
publications, New Delhi.
3) Kuppuswamy (1981), Social Change in India. Vikas Pulications, Ghaziabad. (Eng. &
Hindi).
4) Madan & Majumdar (1989), An Introduction to Social Anthropology. National Publication,
New Delhi (Hindi & English).
5) Madhurima (2000), Readings in Sociology. Part-III, New Academic Publishing House,
Jalandhar.
6) Sharma, R.K. (1997), Indian Society: Institutions and Change. Atlantic Publications, New
Delhi.
7) Sharma, R.N. & Sharma, R.K. (1977), Social Change and Social Problems in Indian.
Atlantic Publication, New Delhi. (Hindi & English).
150
8. GEOGRAPHY
BABED-GEOO53
WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of semester the students will be able to
• analyze the geographic dimensions of the world regions in terms of their political and
administrative characteristics.
• explain the physical and human resource base and their interface with economic
development.
• describe development problems and prospects.
Course Content
Study of the following regions of the world in terms of constituent countries, strategic location,
salient physical, demographic and economic features, cultural patterns, resource base, economic
development, problem and prospects
Unit –I
(i) Anglo America
(ii) Latin America
Unit –II
(i) Europe
(ii) Australia
(iii) Russia and Commonwealth of independent states(CIS)
Unit –III
East Asia
South East Asia
South Asia
151
UNIT – IV
(i) Middle East and North Africa
(ii) Sahara of Africa South
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations conducted by the teacher. The remaining portion will be covered in the
form of individualized sessional work which will include the following projects
• identify and categorize major resources of East Asia, South East Asia and South Asia.
• write a report on demographic features of North and South Africa.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project Work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Books Recommended
1) Blij, O. M.(1993), Development Geography: Regions and Concepts. John Wiley, New
York.
2) English, P.W. & James, A. M. (1989), World Regional Geography: A Question of Place.
John Wiley, New York.
3) Jackson, R. H. & Lloyd E. H. (1991), World Regional Geography: Issues for Today. John
Wiley, New York.
4) Kromm, D.E. (1980), World Regional Geography. Saunders Publishing, New York.
5) Don, R. H.(1980), Essentials of Geography and Development. Macmillan, New York.
6) Tirkha, R.N., Bali, P.K. & Sekhon, M.S. (2000), World Regional Geography. New
Academic Publishers, New Delhi.
152
9. MATHEMATICS
BABED-MATO53
ANALYSIS
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the completion of the semester the students will be able to
• discuss integrals of various types
• prove various theorems related with integral calculus.
• explain improper integrals and their convergence along with various details of functions with
their parameters.
• discuss sequences and series of functions, uniform convergence.
• work out various tests and theorems related to convergence.

Unit–I
Riemann integral, Integrability of continuous and monotonic functions. The fundamental
theorem of integral calculus. Mean value theorems of integral calculus
Improper integrals and their convergence, Comparison tests, Abel's and Dirichlet's tests, Beta
and Gamma functions. Frullani’s integral. Integral as a function of a parameter. Continuity, derivability
and integrability of an integral of a function of a parameter
[Scope as in Chapters 6 (excluding Section 6.6.3), 9,15 (Sections 15.1-15.14 only) of the
book 'A Course of Mathematical Analysis' by Shanti Narayan, Twelfth edition]
Unit II
Double and triple integrals, Fibonis theorem without proof, change of order of integration in
double integrals, Volume of a region in space, triple integrals in spherical and cylindrical coordinates,
substitution in multiple integrals
[Scope as in sections 13.1 to 13.4, 13.6, 13.7 of chapter 13 in the book 'Calculus and
Analytical Geometry' by G.B. Thomas and R.L. Finney, 9th Edition]
Unit–III
Sequences and series of functions, point wise and uniform convergence, Cauchy criterion for
uniform convergence, Weierstrass M-test, Abel's and Dirichlet's tests for uniform convergence,
153
uniform convergence and continuity, uniform convergence and Reimann integration, uniform
convergence and differentiation
Unit IV
Weiervstrass approximation theorem, power series, interval of convergence of power series,
Abel's and Taylor's theorems for power series
Fourier series, Fourier expansion of piecewise monotonic functions
[scope as in relevant sections of chapters 12, 13, 14 of the book 'Mathematical Analysis' (2nd edition)
by S.C. Malik and Savita Arora]
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations conducted by the teacher. The remaining portion will be covered in the
form of individualized sessional work which will include the following
• teacher may familiarize the students with examples of course content.
• teacher will give extensive practice in the mathematical skills.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project Work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Books Recommended
1) Apostol, T.M. (1985), Mathematical Analysis. Norosa Publishing House, New Delhi.
2) Goldberg, R.R. (1970), Real Analysis. Oxford & IBH Publishing Co., New Delhi.
3) Lang, S. (1983), Undergraduate Analysis. Springer-Verlag, New York.
4) Somasundaram, D. & Choudhary, B. (1997), A First Course in Mathematical Analysis.
Narosa Publishing House, New Delhi.
5) Narayan, S. (2000), A Course of Mathematical Analysis. S. Chand & Co., New Delhi.
6) Jain, P.K. & Kaushik, S.K. (2000), An Introduction to Real Analysis. S. Chand & Co., New
Delhi.
7) Malik, S.C. & Arora, S. (1999), Mathematical Analysis. 2nd Edition, New Age International
Publishers
154
GENERAL PRACTICUM
BABED-SRPC53
SCHOOL RELATED PRACTICUM (100 Marks)
CREDITS 5
• Try 2-3 sessions of microteaching under simulated situations.
• Visit a school of repute in Chandigarh and record class room interaction of teachers, interpret
and report.
• Administer a tool of organizational climate in a school and prepare a report.
BABED-LSTC53
LIFE SKILLS TRAINING (100 MARKS)
CREDITS 5
• Extensive use and repetition of life skills affected in previous semester and provide situation
where these could be applied and then be evaluated.
TUTORIALS
The students will be associated with one teacher, who will supervise individual progress on school
related practicum, improvement in life skills, sessional work of various subjects, general problems
related to academics and interaction among themselves etc. Also, the talent of individual students will
be explored and nurtured.
B.A. Hons. (Edu.) B.Ed.
SEMESTER–VI (Session 2011-12)
COURSE STRUCTURE FOR SEMESTER VI
S.N. NATURE SUBJECT CODE SUBJECT TITLE LECTURE TUTORIAL PRACTICAL CREDITS
1 COMPULSORY BABED-ENGC63 ENGLISH 5 0 0 5
155
2 ONE OF TWO BABED-PBIC63
BABED-HCPC63
PUNJABI
HISTORY & CULTURE
OF PUNJAB
5
5
0
0
0
0
5
5
3 & 4 TWO OF NINE BABED-ECOO63
BABED-ENGO63
BABED-GEOO63
BABED-HINO63
BABED-HISO63
BABED-MATO63
BABED-POLO63
BABED-PBIO63
BABED-SOCO63
ECONOMICS
ENGLISH
GEOGRAPHY
HINDI
HISTORY
MATHS
POLITICAL SCIENCE
PUNJABI
SOCIOLOGY
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5 & 6 COMPULSORY BABED-EDUC11
BABED-EDU12
EDUCATIONAL
RESEARCH &
STATISTICS
VALUE EDUCATION
4
4
0
0
1
1
5
5
7 COMPULSORY BABED-SRPC63 SCHOOL RELATED
PRACTICUM
2 0 3
(IN FIELD)
5
8 COMPULSORY BABED-LSTC63 LIFE SKILLS TRAINING 4 0 1
(IN LIBRARY)
5
GRAND TOTAL
40
PAPER I: BABED-EDU11: EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND STATISTICS
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
156
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the students will be able to
• explain the concept of educational research
• differentiate between methods of educational research.
• formulate hypotheses of research.
• explain the applications of statistical techniques in education.
• develop the skills to carry out research.
Course Content
Unit-1
Unit II
Unit III
Unit IV
Unit V
Process of educational research: selection of research problem, statement
of research problem, review of literature, formulation of hypotheses,
sampling and its techniques
Methods of research: Historical research, Descriptive research,
Experimental research
Action research: concept, characteristics, importance, process, and tools
Tools and techniques of research : psychological tests, observations,
questionnaire, interviews, rating scales, achievement tests
Statistical techniques of analysis: measures of central tendency and
variability , tabulation and graphical representation of data
Correlation : meaning, Rank difference and Pearson- Product moment
method and their interpretation
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of sessional work which will include:
• Visit a neighboring locality to identify some issues which need to be studied. The students
will be required to take up small research project and make use of appropriate research
tool over a small group and apply suitable statistics to interpret its results.
20 marks
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
(i) Theory paper at the end of the session will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The
students will be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3
Credits).
(ii) Supervised sessional work: project work (20 marks: 1 Credit)
(iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions, etc.
(20 marks): 1 Credit.
Suggested Readings
1) Best, J.W & Kahn, J.V. (1995), Research in Education. Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi.
2) Edwards, A.L. (1960), Experimental Design in Psychological Research. Holts, New York.
157
3) Lindquist, E.F. (1953), Design and Analysis of Experiments in Education and Psychology.
Houghton Mifflin Co. Boston.
4) Tuckman, B.W.(1972), Conducting Educational Research. Harcourt Brace, Javanovich
5) Kaul, L. (2004), Methodology of Educational Reasearch. Vikas Publishing House, New Delhi.
6) Kaul, L.(2004), Shekshik Anusandhan ki Karya Pranali. Vikas Publishing House, New Delhi.
7) Ary, Donald & Jacob (1976), Introduction to Statistics, Purpose and Procedures. Holt Rinehart
and Winston, New York.
PAPER II: BABED-EDU12: VALUE EDUCATION
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of semester, the students will be able to
• describe the moral learning inside & outside the school.
• explain various intervention strategies for value inculcation in education.
• describe tools of value inculcation.
158
Course Content
Unit I Concept and nature of values, classification, need and importance of
value education
Unit II Philosophical basis of values as viewed by various philosophies with
special reference to Indian philosophy
Sociological and psychological basis of value education
Unit III
Factors affecting value preferences, culturally induced values, value
preferences and value systems
Unit IV
Unit V
Intervention strategies for value inculcation: Rationale building model,
Self-confrontation model, Value clarifying model, Role playing, Case
method
Tools of value inculcation, course curriculum and content analysis
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of sessional work.
Following projects will be taken up:
• students will be required to identify values that have been designed to be inculcated
through course content ( in any subject ) and prepare a list.
• a project may be taken up to identify value preference pattern of people ( age wise ,
educational level wise, vocation wise , qualification wise ). Different teams may take either
of these levels and comparisons may be made through open house discussions. The
preferences may be rationalized and conclusions be drawn.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
(i) Theory paper at the end of the session will consist of ten questions two from each unit.
The students will be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60
marks: 3 Credits).
(ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers
and seminars (20 marks: 1 Credit).
(iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1) Bhatti, S.R. (1986), Knowledge, Value & Education: An Axiomatic Analysis. Gian Publishers,
New Delhi.
2) Rajput, J.S. (2003), Value Education in Indian schools: Experiences and Strategies of
Implementation. Neelkamal publications, Hyderabad.
3) Pandey, V.C. (2005), Value Education and Education for Human Rights. Isha books, New
Delhi.
4) Kar, N.N. (1996), Value Education. Associate Publishers, Ambala Cantt.
5) Venkatanh, N. & Sandhay, N. (2002), Research in Value Education. A.B.H Publishing Cooperation,
New Delhi.
6) Ruhela, S.P. (1990), Human Rights and Education. Sterling Publishers, New Delhi.
7) Goel, A. & Goel, S.L. (2005), Human Values and Education. Deep and Deep Publishing Pvt
Ltd, New Delhi.
159
PAPER-III: BABED-ENGC63 : ENGLISH (COMPULSORY)
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives of Teaching English
At the end of semester, the students will be able to:
• Make use of competence in all the four skills i.e Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing
• Describe and use new pedagogic practices in the teaching of both language and literature.
• Devise and promote student centric pedagogic techniques for the teaching of English.
160
Prescribed text
The Silent Song: 2007 edition
COURSE CONTENT
UNIT I (POETRY)
14, 15, 17,20,21,22 from The Silent Song, 2007 edition.
UNIT II
Pygmalion by G.B. Shaw
UNIT III
Passage to India by E.M. Foster
UNIT IV
Translation from Modern Indian Language to English (Paragraph)
Translation from Vernacular to English (sentences) and Vice versa
UNIT V
One word Substitution.
Antonyms.
Adjectives.
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of internal assessment based on terminal
examinations, attendance, classroom interactions, etc. (20 %).
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will
be required to attempt one question from each of the five units. (80 marks: 4
Credits).
ii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings :
1. Venugopal. K. Rao (2007) Peculiar English, Neelakamal Publications, New Delhi
2. Goodwyn Andrew and Branson Jane (2005), Teaching English : A Hand Book for Primary
and Secondary School Teachers , Rougtledgehalmer Publisher.
161
3. Chestron , G.K. (2000) Writings of G.B. Shaw, Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi.
4. Dixion (2000) English Idioms, Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi.
5. Johnson S.C. (1997) Correct English, Neelkamal Publications, New Delhi.
PAPER IV: BABED-PBIC63: PUNJABI (COMPULSORY)
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
(gzikph bkiwh)
Objectives
• fJ; g/go dk T[d/ô ftfdnkoEhnK B{z gzikph Bktb pko/ ft;fsqs ikDekoh
d/Dk j? gzikph d/ ;kfjsekoK pko/ ikD{ eotkT[Dk j?.
• ;kfjsekoK dh G{fwek B{z fBôfus eoBk j?.
• gzikph ftnkeoD ;zpzXh ikDekoh d/Dk j?.
• tkose pko/ ftfdnkoEhnK B{z v{zxh ikDekoh d/Dk j?.
162
gkmeqw
1H søshô, fwZso ;?B whs, bkj"o p[e ôkg, b[fXnkDk
2H u'Dt/A b/y, fgqz;hgb s/ik f;zx, gzikph ;kfjs gqekôB, nzfwqs;o
3H bx{ gqôB
4H g?oQk ouBk
5H ftnkeoD
:{fBN ns/ Ehw
UNIT - 1
Bktb søsh; d/ ftô/, ;ko ns/ gkso fusoD pko/ gqôB (d' ftZu'A fJe) 16
UNIT - 2
u'Dt/A b/y (fgSb/ S/ b/yK ftZu'A) fe;/ fJe dk ;ko (fszB ftZu'A fJe)
16
UNIT - 3
søshô Bktb ns/ u'Dt/A b/y (fgSb/ b/yK ftZu'A) bx{ gqôB (dZ; ftZu'A
nZm)
2x8=16
UNIT - 4
g?oQk ouBk (brGr 500 ôpd) (uko ftZu'A fJe) 16
UNIT - 5
(T) r[ow[yh fbZgh dh w[ZYbh ikDekoh Bkb ;zpzfXs gqôB (r[ow[yh fbZgh
dk iBw ns/ ftek;, BkweoD, r[ow[yh fbZgh dh gzikph Gkôk bJh nB[e{bsk
ns/ gqw[Zy ftô/ôsktK) (d' ftZu'A fJZe)
8
(n) nõpkoK bJh gq?Z; B'N fsnko eoB/ (ekbi dhnK ;kfjse, ;fGnkukoe,
y/v ns/ nekdfwe y/so Bkb ;zpzfXs ;orowhnK pko/) (d' ftZu'A fJZe)
8
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of internal assessment
based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions, etc. (20%).
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
(i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will be
required to attempt one question from each of the five units (80 marks: 4 Credits).
(ii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
163
Suggested Readings
1 eftsktK ethnK d/ ekft ;zrqfjnK ftZu'A fJeZmhnK eoBhnK jB.
2 søsh; Bktb fwZso ;?B whs (1993), bkj"o p[Ze ôkg, b[fXnkDk.
3 gzikph ;kfjs dh T[sgsh s/ ftek; - gofwzdo f;zx feogkb f;zx e;/b
(1968), bkj"o p[Ze ôkg b[fXnkDk.
4 gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk;(1987) - gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh uzvhrVQ.
5 gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; (1972)- gzikph :{Bhtof;Nh, gfNnkbk.
6 ekft d/ sZs-gq/w gqekô f;zx (1970), bkj"o p[Ze ôkg, b[fXnkDk.
PAPER IV: BABED-HCPC63: HISTORY AND CULTURE OF PUNJAB
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 80 (4)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the students will be able to:
• explain the development in social and economic life of Punjab after achieving independence.
• explain the development in education and literature in Punjab after independence.
• describe the new trends in social and economic life of Punjab.
Unit-I
Significant developments leading to independence
Impact of partition on Punjab
Unit II
Rebuilding of social and economic life after partition
The main stages in the movement for the Punjabi speaking state; reorganization act of 1966
Unit-III
New trends in social life: gender discrimination; emigration from Punjab
New trends in economic life: modernization of agriculture, land reforms
Unit IV
Development of education in Punjab after independence
Development of Punjabi literature with special reference to prose, poetry and
164
drama
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 80% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining 20% will be covered in the form of internal assessment based on
terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions, etc.
Evaluation Scheme
In all, nine questions will be set. Each question will carry 16 marks.
ix. First question shall be short answer type containing 12 short questions spread
over the whole syllabus. Candidates will attempt 8 out of the 12 questions in
about 25 to 30 words each. It shall carry 16 marks and shall be compulsory.
Rest of the paper shall contain four units. Each unit shall have two essay type
questions and the candidate shall attempt one question from each unit. Each
essay type question will be set on half of the topics and not on a single subtopic
(80 marks: 4 Credits).
ii) Internal assessment based on terminal examination attendance, classroom
interaction etc. (20 marks : 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
12. Singh, F. (1987), History and Culture of the Punjab. Part II, Publication Bureau, Punjabi
University, Patiala.
13. Singh, F. (1974), Freedom Struggle in Punjab. Publication Bureau, Punjabi University, Patiala.
14. Grewal, J.S. (2005), The Sikhs of Punjab. New Cambridge House, New Delhi.
15. Singh, K. (1991) A History of the Sikhs. Vol. II (1839-1998), Oxford University Press, Delhi.
16. Satya, M. R. (1978), Heroic Tradition in Punjab(1900-1947). Publication Bureau, Punjabi
University, Patiala.
17. Chopra, P.N. & Das, M.N. (1974), A Social, Cultural & Economic History of India. Vol.III,
Macmillan India, New Delhi.
18. Yadav, K.C. (1991), Haryana Aitihasik Simhavalokan (Hindi). Haryana Sahitya Akademy,
Chandigarh.
19. Grewal, J.S. (2004), Social and Cultural History of Punjab: Prehistoric, Ancient and Early
Medieval. Foundation Books Pvt Ltd Cambridge House, New Delhi.
20. Gupta, K.K. (2007), History and Culture of Punjab. Mohindra Publishing House, Chandigarh.
21. Rai, R. (2007), History and Culture of Punjab. New Academic Publisher, Jalandhar.
22. Johar, R.S. (1983), Studies in Punjabi Economy. GNDU Publication, Amritsar.
(C) OPTIONAL SUBJECTS (PAPER V and VI)
The student is required to take up two elective/optional subjects from the following nine
subjects. Each paper will be of 100 marks.
i) English
ii) Hindi
iii) Punjabi
iv) History
v) Political Science
vi) Economics
vii) Sociology
viii) Geography
ix) Mathematics
165
1. ENGLISH (Elective)
BABED-ENGO63
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of semester, the students will be able to:
• make use of competence in all the four skills i.e. listening, speaking , reading and writing.
• describe implications of teaching/learning language through literature.
• develop the power of imagination through literature.

Unit I
Literary terms and definitions
Characterization, Masque, Mine, Ballet, Dialogue, Exposition, Climax, Denouement, Catastrophe,
Three Unities, Soliloquy, Tragic Hero, Catharsis, Hamartia, Chorus
Unit II
Drama Winter's Tale by William Shakespeare
Unit III
Text No. 17 – The Unknown Citizen (W.H. Auden)
Text No. 18 – Of Studies (Francis Bacon)
Text No. 19 - Female Orators ( Joseph Addison )
Text No. 20 – Letter to Lord Chesterfield ( Samuel Johnson )
Text No 21 – Johnson’s Character (James Boswell )
Text No. 22 – On Going a Journey ( William Hazlitt )
Text No. 23 Dream Children : A Reverie ( Charles Lamb )
Text No. 24 – Young Goodman Brown ( Nathaniel Hawthorne )
Text No. 25 – The Open Window ( Saki ( H.H. Munro)
166
Text No. 26 – The Rocking-Horse Winner ( D.H. Lawrence )
Text No. 27 – In Another Country ( Ernest Hemingway )
Text No. 28 – The Magic Barrel ( Bernard Malamud )
Text No. 29 – Stranger in the Village ( James Baldwin )
Text No. 30 - The Thing without a Name ( V.S. Naipaul )
Text No. 31 – The Bed of Nails ( Anthony Jay and Jonathan Lynn )
from the book Anthology of Poetry and Prose from Renaissance to Modern edited by Mutatkar and
Sharma
Unit IV
I. Translation from hindi/ punjabi into english
II. Idioms
III. Pair of words to be used in sentences.
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of sessional work which will
include the following project:
• preparation of a report on the writings of any poet mentioned in the course content.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project Work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit)).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
1. Tickoo,C. & Kumar,J.S .(2000), Writing with a purpose. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
2. Fifteen Poets. (1988), Oxford University Press India. Calcutta.
3. Hewings, M.(2007), Advanced English Grammar. Cambridge University Press India Ltd, New
Delhi.
4. Singh, V.R.(2009), The Written Word. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
5. Mutatkar and Sharma (2010), Anthology of Poetry and Prose from Renaissance to Modern.
McMillan Publishers, New Delhi.
6. Shakespeare, W. (2008), Winter's Tale. UBS Publishers, New Delhi.
7. Abrams, M.H. (2007), A Glossary of Literary Terms. Thomson Wadsworth, New Delhi.
8. Cuddon, J.A. (1998),The Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory. Penguin
Books India (P) Ltd., New Delhi.
167
2. HINDI (ELECTIVE)
BABED-HINO63
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
vè;;u izfØ;k ds lekiu ds mijkUr fo|kFkhZ %&
• lkfgRf;d vkSj lkekftd fo"k;ksa ij fucU/ ys[ku dk vH;kl djus gsrq de ls de ik¡p fucU/ fy[ksaxs A
• + dkO;] egkdkO;] [k’MdkO; o fxfrdkO;ksa dh ifjHkk"kk] Hksn] rFkk fo'ks"krkvksa dk o’kZu
djsaxs A
• + fucU/] lalej’k] thouh rFkk vkRedFkk tSls x| fo/kvksa ds Lo:I vkSj rRoksa dk o’kZu djsaxs
A
• vyadkj dh ifjHkk"kk] fo'ks"krk,¡] o fn, x, vyadkjksa dk iz;ksx djsaxs A
• fu/kZfjr NUnksa o vyadkjksa ds y{‘k o mnkgj’k fy[ksaxs A
• nsoukxjh fyfi ds fodkl] xq’k nks"k vkSj lq/kjksa ds mik; lq>k,saxs A
• rkj] i=k] foKkfIr@foKki’k] dk fn, x, lanHkZ esa :i rS;kj djsaxs A
Course Content
Unit I
fucU/ ys[ku (dsoy lkfgfR;d vkSj lkeftd fo"k;ksa ij)
dqy vkB fucU/ksa esa ls fdlh ,d ij fucU/ fy[kus ds fy;s dgk tk;sxkA
unit II
leh{kk fl¼kUr
168
(d) dkO; dh ifjHkk"kk rFkk Hksn] egkdkO;] [k.MdkO;] xhfr dkO; dh ifjHkk"kk rFkk
fo'ks"krk,aA
([k) x| fo/k,a&fucU/ laLej.k] thouh rFkk vkRedFkk dk Lo:i vkSj rRoksa dk lkeU; ifjp;A
Unit III
NUn&vyadkj ifjp;
(d) dsoy fuEufyf[kr vyadkj fu/kZfjr gSa %&
vuqizkl] ;ed] 'ys"k] oØksfDr] miek] :id] vfr';ksfDr] fojks/kHkkl] mRizs{kk izrhi A
([k) dsoy fueufyf[kr NUn fu/kZfjr gSa %&
nksgk] lksjBk] pkSikbZ] jksyk] dq.Mfy;ka] loS;k] nzqr foyfEcr] gfjxhfrdk] misUnzotzk]
bUnzotzkA
unit IV
fgUnh Hkk"kk vkSj mldh fyfi
(d) rkj@fuea=k.k i=k] foKkfIr@foKkiu dk :i rS;kj djukA
([k) nsoukxjh fyfi% fodkl] xq.knks"k lq/kj ds mik;A
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of sessional work which will
include projects:
3- fdlh ,d lkekftd fo"k; ij foKkiu dk :i rS;kj djsaA
4- fdlh egku fgUnh dfo dh thouh rFkk vkRedFkk fy[ksaA
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
7- prqosZnh jkts'ojizlkn] (2008) fgUnh O;kdj.k midkj izdk'ku] vkxjkA
8- lkguh ,l-ch] 'kekZ vkj- ih (2007) loksZÙke fgUNh O;kdj.k] lkguh izdk'ku] vkxjkA
9- jktkjke dYiuk (2009) fuca/ cks/] LisDVªe cqDl izk- fy-] fnYyhA
10- xqIr x.kifrpUnz (2008)] lkfgfR;d fuca/] yksdHkkjrh izdk'ku] bykgcknA
169
11- xqykVh ;'k (2007)] c`gr~ lkfgfR;d fucU/] lw;ZHkkjrh izdk'ku] fnYyhA
12- uxsUnz gjn;ky (2009) fgUnh lkfgR; dk bfrgkl] e;wj isijcSDl] uks;M+kA
3. PUNJABI (ELECTIVE)
BABED-PBIO63
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
• fJ; g/go dk wzst ftfdnkoEhnK B{z nkX[fBe gzikph BkNe pko/ ft;fsqs
ikDekoh d/Dk j?.
• fBpzX ftXk fsZyk eoBk j?.
• gzikph ;kfjs d/ fJfsjk; d/ nkX[fBe ekb d/ sZEK B{z ftukoBk j?.
• BkNe ;zpzXh v{zxh ikDekoh d/Dk j?.
• ;kfjs d/ nkX[fBe o{gK s'A ikD{ eotkT[Dk j?.
• ;kfjs ftôb/ôD ;zpzXh ftfdnkoEhnK dh o[uh B{z tXkT[D bJh eftsk ftZu
tkd s'A ikD{ eotkT[Dk j?.
gkmeqqw
1H ekwkrkNk wko{, jouoB f;zx, e;s{oh bkb n?Av ;zB÷, nzfwq;so
2H ohMK s/ ow÷K (fgSb/ gzi fBpzX), vkH r[ouoB f;zx, gpbhe/ôB fpT{o',
gzikp :{Bhtof;Nh, uzvhrVQ
3H bx{ gqôB
4H ;kfjs d/ nkX{fBe o{g
:{fBN ns/ Ehw
UNIT - 1
ekwkrkNk wko{L (d' ftZu'A fJe)
(i) BkNe dk ftôk
(ii) gbkN
(iii) gkso fusoD
(iv) ozrwzu 15
UNIT - 2
ohMK s/ ow÷K (fgSb/ gzi fBpzX)L
170
fBpzX dk ftôk t;s{ (d' ftZu'A fJe) 7
;kfjse nkb'uBk (d' ftZu'A fJe) 8
UNIT – 3
ekwkrkNk wko{ ns/ ohMK s/ ow÷K (fgSb/ gzi fBpzX) T[go nkXkfos bx{ gqôB
(nZm ftZu'A gzi)
15
UNIT - 4
;kfjs d/ nkX[fBe o{g (ukoK ftZu'A fszB)
(i) eftsk
(ii) BkNe
(iii) ejkDh
(iv) Bktb
(v) ;øoBkwk 15
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of sessional work which will
include:
• nkX[fBe gzikph tkose T[go ;zy/g B'N fby'.
• nkX[fBe gzikph ;kfjs d/ o{gK d/ iBw ns/ ftek; pko/ ;zy/g ftu fby'.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
xv) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks( 3 Credits).
xvi) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
xvii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Books
1 ethnK dhnK eftsktK T[jBK d/ ekft ;zrqfjnK ftZu'A b?DhnK jB.
2 to xo-BkNe-nkJhH;hHBzdk (1970), gzikph ;kfjs gqekôB, nzfwqs;o
3 gzikph ;kfjs dh T[sgsh s/ ftek; - gofwzdo f;zx, feogkb f;zx e;/b
(1968), bkj"o p[Ze ôkg, b[fXnkDk
171
4 gzikph nfXn?B s/ nfXnkgB d/ w[Yb/ ;zebg ihs f;zx i'ôh, tkoô
ôkj(1999) ckT{v/ôB nzfwqs;o,
5 gzikph BkNe ns/ ozrwzu-ewb/ô T[Zgb (2000), gpbhe/ôB fpUo', gzikph
:{Bhtof;Nh, gfNnkbk
6 ozrwzu d/ p[fBnkdh fB:w-i;ftzdo e"o wKrN (2003), gpbhe/ôB fpUo',
gzikph :{Bhtof;Nh, gfNnkbk
7 gqrshtkd-vkH ;[fozdo e[wko dt/ôto (2008), b'erhs gqekôB
8 nkX[fBe gzikph eftsk-gfotosB s/ gqftoshnK vkH G{fgzdo e"o(2004)
9 nkX[fBe gzikph ekft XkoktK d/ ftukoXkoh nkXko vkH eowihs f;zx (1983)
10 nkX[fBe gzikph ;kfjs dh o{go/yk (1850-1970)- i'frzdo f;zx (2003)
gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gfNnkbk
11 gzikph ;kfjs dk fJfsjk; (nkX[fBe ekb 1901 s'A 1995 sZe) vkH i;ftzdo
f;zx, vkH wkB f;zx YhAv;k (1997) gpbhe/ôB fpT{o', gfNnkbk
12 nkX[fBe gzikph ekft-vkH ;[yd/t f;zx
14 gqrshtkd-vkH ;[fozdo e[wko dt/ôto (2008), b'erhs gqekôB
16 gzikph BkNeL f;XKs s/ gqftoshnK- r[o[fdnkb f;zx c[Zb (2002) gzikph
:{Bhtof;Nh, gfNnkbk
172
4. HISTORY
BABED-HISO63
WORLD HISTORY 1871-1956 AD
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the students will be able to:
• explain the concepts like Imperalism , Nationalism, Communism , Fascism and
Modernization.
• describe the history of modern Europe , U.S.A., China and Japan.
• analyze the major developments that have changed the face of the modern world.
Unit-I
New Imperialism 1871-1914: main features; partition of Africa-causes, colonization and impact
Congress of Berlin: circumstances, provisions and significance of the Congress of Berlin 1878
Diplomatic developments in Europe: circumstances leading to the formation of Triple Alliance of
1882 and Triple Entente
Unit-II
World war I: division of Europe into two blocks; causes of the first world war
Paris peace conference: Treaty of Versailles 1919; provisions, major defects and their impact
Russian revolution: causes and impact of the Russian revolution of 1917
Unit -III
Nationalism and Communism in China: causes for the Nationalist revolution of 1911 and its
results, circumstances leading to the revolution of 1949 and its results
Modernization in Japan: Meji restoration and modernization in Japan
The Great depression of 1929: causes of the Great depression in the USA; its spread to
Germany, France and Britain, its impact; Rossevelt’s new deal
Unit –IV
Fascism and Nazism: circumstances responsible for rise of Fascism under Mussolini in Italy;
Nazism in Germany under Adolf Hitler
World war: causes responsible for the second world war- II; modernization of Turkey under
Mustafa Kamal Pasha
Map:
(a) Important historical places: Geneva, Washington, Tokyo, Versailles, Constantinople, Peking,
Beijing, Manchuria, Nanking, Frankfrut, Johannesburg, Cairo, Jerusalem
(b) Europe on the eve of world war- I
(c) Europe on the eve of world war-II
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of sessional work which will include:
• preparation of a note on the contribution of Adolf Hitler (Nazism) or modernization of Turkey
under Mustafa Kamal Pasha
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
173
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit)).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings
8) Chandra, B. (1989), India’s Struggle for Independence. Penguin Books, New Delhi, India.
9) Chandra, S. (2008), Medieval India. Har-Anand Publications, New Delhi.
10) Thapar, R. (2002), The History of Early India. Penguin Books,New Delhi.
11) Geoffery, H. (2005), The Compact History of the World. Parker Publications, New Hyde
Park, New York.
12) Geoffery, H.(2001),Short History Of The World. Parker Publications, New Hyde Park, New
York.
13) Koch, W.H. (1989), Origin of First World War. Palgrave Publishers, United Kingdom.
14) Ketelbay, C.D.M. (2005), Short History of Europe. Surjit Publishers, New Delhi.
5. POLITICAL SCIENCE
BABED-POLO63
INTERNATIONAL POLITICS: THEORY AND PRACTICE
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
174
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the students will be able to
• explain the meaning and approaches to international politics.
• analyze relevance of idealist and realist theories in contemporary international politics.
• discuss meaning and genesis of collective security, and dilemma and relevance of collective
security.
• describe the working of the United Nations.
• define the concept of uni-polarity, bi-polarity and multi-polarity.
• explain the restructuring of world economic relations in the light of Globalization.
• discuss need and emergence of various regional organizations.
Course content
Unit–1
Meaning, nature and scope of international politics
Realist and idealist approaches to international politics
Unit-II
National power: its elements
System of balance of power and collective security
United Nations: aims, objectives and principles
Unit-III
Cold war and post cold war era of international politics
Bipolar, unipolar and nature of emerging world order
Unit-IV
Regional organizations: SAARC and ASEAN
United Nations and maintenance of world peace, organs of UN and their role
New trends in the international politics: Globalization and its impact
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of sessional work which will
include projects:
• book review(on any topic mentioned in the course content).
• group discussion on Globalization.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question shall
be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of ten
short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
175
Recommended Books
1) Bull, H. (1963), The Anarchical Society; A study of Order in World Politics. Macmillan.
London.
2) Carr, E.H. (1939), The Twenty Year Crisis. Macmillan, London.
3) Carr, E.H. (1944), Conditions of Peace. The Macmillan Company, New York.
4) Frankel, J. (1963), The Making of Foreign Policy. Oxford University Press, London.
5) Hoffman, S.H. (1979), Contemporary Theory in International Relations. Addison-Wesley,
Massachusetts.
6) Morgenthau, H.J.(1985), Politics Among Nations: The Struggle for Power and Peace. 6th
Edn., revised by K.W. Thompson, Alfred Knopf,
New York.
7) Palmer, N.D. & Perkins, H. (1971), International Relations. Scientific Book Company,
Calcutta.
8) Verma, S.P. (1988), International System and the Third World. Vikas Publishers, New
Delhi
9) Baylis, J. & Steve, S. (2001),The Globalization of World Politics. Oxford University Press,
London.
6. ECONOMICS
BABED-ECO63
QUANTITATIVE METHODS
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
176
Note: Use of basic four operations calculator is allowed. Scientific calculator is not allowed.
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the students will be able to
• explain the mathematical forms of economics.
• describe the average value , middle value and highest value under an equation.
• explain how two equations are correlated with each other.
• explain and solve the problem by taking some periods as base periods.
Unit–I
Elementary idea of set and function: simple, derivative, differentiation of simple functions
polynomial (x), exponential functions. Maxima and minima (functions of one variable only). Simple
application of economics
Unit–II
Matrices: definition and types, operations (sum, difference, product and transpose), adjoint
and inverse of a matrix (upto 3 × 3), solution of equations (up to 3) by matrix methods
Measures of central tendency and their uses: mean, median, partition values, mode,
measures of dispersion, skewness
Unit -III
Correlation analysis- Karl Pearson’s (except grouped data) and Spearman’s formula, simple
Regression analysis
Interpolation-Binomial, Expansion, Newton’s (advancing difference method) and Lagrange’s method
Unit– IV
Index numbers: concepts, problems and importance; Simple index number, Lespeyre’s
Paache’s and Fisher’s index numbers only. (among weighted index numbers), Reversibility tests
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining 40% will be covered in the form of sessional work
which will include:
• report writing on demographic structure of a neighbourhood (the characteristics of size,
growth, density, distribution of human population will be studied with the help of appropriate
statistical tools and techniques).
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
177
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Books Recommended
1. Jain,T.R.(2007), Buisness Mathematics and Statistics. Vikas Publications, New Delhi.
2. Gupta, S.C.(2007), Fundamentals of Statistics. Himalaya Publishing House, Bombay.
3. Archibald, G.C. & Lipsey, R.G. (1977), An Introduction to a Mathematical Treatment of
Economics. English Language Book Society, London.
4. Sanchati, D.C. & Kapoor, V.K. (1993), Business Mathematics. Sultan Chand & Sons, New
Delhi.
5. Sandhu, A.S. & Jain, T.R.(2008), Quantitative Methods. V.K.Publications, Educational
Publishers, New Delhi.
7. SOCIOLOGY
BABED-SOCO63
SOCIAL DISORGANISATION AND EMERGING PROBLEMS
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the students will be able to:
• explain the concept and levels of social disorganization.
• analyze the extent of various personal, familial and societal problems.
• explain the different aspects of crime and criminal behavior.
Unit–I
Social disorganization: concepts & levels (personal, familial and societal)
178
Crime and criminal: theories of criminal behavior
Unit–II
Personal problems: alcoholism, drug addiction, suicide, problems of adolescence
Unit –III
Familial problems – wife abuse, elder abuse, problems of working women, problems of
unemployed (educated and uneducated), juvenile delinquency
Unit –IV
Societal problems: student unrest, corruption, environmental problems, crisis in higher
education, poverty, child abuse and child labour
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures, discussions and
presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of sessional work which will include:
• seminar on the crisis and challenges in higher education or project on the problems of
educated unemployed (team project).
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, Individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
List of Suggested Readings
1. Ahuja, R.(1992), Social Problems in India. Rawat Publications, Jaipur.
2. Julian, J. (1980), Social Problems (3rd ed.). Prentice Hall, New Jersey.
3. Aziz, A. (1982), Poverty Alleviation in India: Policies and Programmes. Ashish
Publications, New Delhi.
4. Murickan, J. (1989), Poverty in India: Challenges & Responses. Xavier Board
Publications, Bangalore.
5. Werner, M. (1998), South Asians & the Dowry Problem. Vikas Publication, New Delhi.
6. Phadris, U. (1989), Ethnicity and Nation Building in South Asia. Sage Publications,
New Delhi.
7. Mahajan, A. & Madhurima (1994), Family Violence and abuse in India. Deep and
Deep Publications, New Delhi.
8. Madhurima (1997), Dynamics of Conjugal Relations: A Study of Wife Abuse. Gyan
Publishing House, New Delhi.
9. Agarwal, J. (1987), The Fight for Survival, Peoples Action for Environment. Centre for
Science and Environment, New Delhi.
10. Muttagi, P.K. (1997), Aging Issues and Old Age Care. Classic Publications, New Delhi.
11. Rajan, S.I. & Mishra, U.S. (1999), India’s Elderly: Burden or Challenge. Sage
Publications, New Delhi.
179
12. Vinod, P. (1996), Interpreting Corruption. Sage Publications, New Delhi.
8. GEOGRAPHY
BABED-GEOO63
GEOGRAPHY OF INDIA
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives;
At the end of semester the students will be able to:
• describe India in the context of South Asia and world.
• enumerate various resources in India.
• explain the term population in relation to the distribution and density,
growth , migration , urbanization.
• discuss the various characteristics of Indian agriculture.
• describe the distribution and localization factors of major industries.
Course Content
Unit–I
India in the context of South Asia, and the world
Relief, drainage, climate, vegetation and soils
180
Unit-II
Iron-ore, manganese, mica, copper, gold; and power resources
Population: numbers, distribution and density, growth, migration, urbanization, and religious
composition
Unit-III
Agriculture- characteristics of Indian agriculture, land use pattern, irrigation, major crops (rice,
whet, jowar, maize, sugarcane, cotton, jute, tea, and groundnut), areas of surplus and deficit food
production and problems of Indian agriculture
Unit-IV
Industries- distribution and localization, factors of major industries (iron and steel, cotton,
textiles, sugar, fertilizers, cement), role of the public sector in Indian economy. Transport : Rail, Road,
Airways and Waterways and International Trade
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of sessional work. The
project work will include:
• identifying and categorizing major crops of Punjab area-wise, district-wise.
• preparation of a report on climate of their local area for a period of whole semester and submit
their observations at the end of the semester.
• assignment related to map work.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks (3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question shall
be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of ten
short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit)
Books Recommended:
1. Deshpande, C.D. (2000), A Regional Interpretation. Northern Book Centre, New Delhi.
2. Johnson, B.L.C. (1980), Resources and Development. Arnold Heinemann, London.
3. Spate, O.H.K. & Learmonth, A.T.A. (1967), Indian & Pakistan: Land, People and
Economy. Methuen, London.
4. Khullar, D.R. (2000), India: A Comprehensive Geography. Kalyani Publishers, New
Delhi.
5. Singh, R.L.(1971), India: A Regional Geography. National Geographical Society of
India, Varanasi.
6. Singh, J. (2003), India: A Comprehensive Systematic Geography. Gyanodaya
Prakashan, Gorakhpur.
7. Singh, G. (1995), A Geography of India. Atma Ram & Sons, New Delhi.
8. Sharma, T.C. (1991), Economic and Commercial Geography of India. Vikas
Publishers, New Delhi.
9. Tirtha, R. & Gopal, K. (1990), Emerging India. Rawat Books, Jaipur.
181
9. MATHEMATICS
BABED-MATO63
ABSTRACT ALGEBRA
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the students will be able to:
• explain various groups and theorems.
• discuss rings, subrings in details like Gaussian and polynomial rings.
• define and exemplifiers vector spaces , subspaces of various types along with the related
theorms.
• discuss linear transformation , linear maps , matrices.
• discuss characteristics, roots and vectors and variety of matrices.
UNIT I
Groups, subgroups, Cosets, Lagrange's Theorem, Normal (subgroups and Quotient groups.
Simple groups, Homomorphism, Isomorphism theorems and Automorphisms, Counting principle.
Cayley's theorem, Permutation groups, Alternating groups, Conjugacy, Class equation
[scope as in sections 2.1-2.11 of chapter 2 of the book 'Topics in Algebra' (second edition) by
LN. Herstein]
182
UNIT II
Rings, Subrings. Integral domains, characteristics of a ring and a field, Ideals, Prime and
Maximal ideals, Homomorphism, Quotient rings, Integral domains. Field of quotients of an Integral
domain, Euclidean domains. The ring of Gaussian Integers, Polynomials rings over rings and fields
[scope as in sections 3.1-3.9 of chapter 3 of the book 'Topics in Algebra' (second edition) by
I.N. Herstein]
UNIT III
Definition and examples of vector spaces, subspaces, sum and direct sum of subspaces.
Linear span, linear dependence, independence and their basic properties, Basis, Finitely generated
vector spaces, Existence theorem for basic dimensional vector space, Invariance of the number of
elements of a basis set, dimension, Existence of complementary subspace of a finite dimensional
vector space, dimension of sums of subspaces
UNIT IV
Linear transformations, algebra of linear transformations, rank and nullity of a linear map,
inverse of a linear transformation, the space L(u, v), composition of linear maps, matrix associated
with a linear map, linear map associated with a matrix, Dimensions of matrix. Rank and nullity of a
matrix
[scope as in sections 3.1-3.6, 4.1-4.7, 5.1-5,5 of a book 'An Introduction to Linear Algebra by
V.Krishnamurthy, V.P. Mainra and J.L. Arora]
Characteristic roots and characteristic vectors, of a matrix, nature of characteristic roots of
special types of matrices, relation between algebraic and geometric multiplicities of a characteristic
root. Minimal polynomial of a matrix, orthogonal reduction of real symmetric matrices, unitary
reduction of Hermitian matrices, similarity of matrices, diagonalization of matrices
(scope as in sections 11.1-11.4, 11.7, 12.2, 12.3, 12.4, 12.6, 13.1-13.4 from the book A Text
Book of Matricesi by Shanti Narayan and P.K. Mittal (10th edition)).
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining will be covered in the form of sessional work which will
include the following activities:
• teacher may familiarize the students with examples of course content.
• teacher will give extensive practice in the mathematical skills.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of 60 marks ( 3 Credits) and 9 questions in all. The first question
shall be of 12 marks, covering the entire syllabus and would be compulsory. It will consist of
ten short answer type questions of which six are to be attempted (2x6 =12 marks). In addition,
eight long answer questions of 12 marks each will be set, taking two from each of four units of
the syllabus, out of which the candidates will be required to attempt one from each unit. (12x4
= 48 marks).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
assignment (20 marks: 1 Credit).
183
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions,
snap test etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings:
1. Herstein, I.N. (2007), Topics in Algebra. 2nd Editions, Wiley Eastern Ltd., New Delhi.
2. Artin, M. (1994), Algebra. Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.
3. Gallian, J.A. (2000), Contemporary Abstract Algebra. Narosa Publishing House, New
Delhi.
4. Singh, S. & Zameeruddin, Q. (2000), Modern Algebra. 7th Edition, Vikas Publishing
House, New Delhi.
5. Datta, K.B. (2007), Matrix and Linear Algebra. Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd., New
Delhi.
6. Hofman, K. & Kunze, R. (2006), Linear Algebra. 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall of India Pvt
Ltd, New Delhi.
7. Krishnamurthy, V., Mainra, V.P. & Arora, J.L. (2006), An Introduction to Linear
Algebra. East West Press, New Delhi.
8. Narayan, S. & Mittal, P.K. (2007), A Text Book of Matrices. 10th Edition, S. Chand &
Co, New Delhi.
GENERAL PRACTICUM
BABED-SRPC63
SCHOOL RELATED PRACTICUM (100 Marks)
CREDITS 5
• A class / group of students /group of people in a locality may be identified and adopted for
inculcating values (e.g. for inculcating value of cleanliness, a slum area may be identified and
cleanliness of the campus) and a strategy may be applied to inculcate such values. A follow
up may be maintained and consequences be used on weekly basis.
• Training in use of research tools like observation, interviews be given under supervised
conditions.
BABED-LSTC63
LIFE SKILL TRAINING (100 Marks)
CREDITS 5
• Skill of empathy
• Skill of management of stress
TUTORIALS
The students will be associated with one teacher, who will supervise individual progress on school
related practicum, improvement in life skills, sessional work of various subjects, general problems
related to academics and interaction among themselves etc. Also, the talent of individual students will
be explored and nurtured.
184
B.A. Hons. (Edu.) B. Ed.
SEMESTER–VII (Session 2011-12)
COURSE STRUCTURE FOR SEMESTER VII
OPTION I: B.ED. ELEMENTARY
S.N
.
NATURE SUBJECT
CODE
SUBJECT TITLE LECTU
RE
TUTORI
AL
PRACTIC
AL
CREDIT
S
1 COMPULSO
RY
BABEDEDUC13
PHILOSOPHICAL,
SOCIOLOGICAL AND
POLITICAL PERSPECTIVE
4 0 1 5
2 COMPULSO
RY
BABEDEDUC14
THE LEARNER NATURE
AND DEVELOPMENT
4 0 1 5
3 COMPULSO
RY
BABEDEDUC15
THEORY OF
INSTRUCTIONAL
TECHNOLOGY AND
EVALUATION
4 0 1 5
4 COMPULSO
RY
BABEDEDUC16
SCHOOL MANAGEMENT
4 0 1 5
5 COMPULSO
RY
BABEDTMENSC
PEDAGOGY OF NATURAL
SCIENCES
3 0 1 2.5
6 COMPULSO
RY
BABEDTMESSC
PEDAGOGY OF SOCIAL
SCIENCES
3 0 1 2.5
7 COMPULSO
RY
BABEDTMEMAT
PEDAGOGY OF
MATHEMATICS
3 0 1 2.5
8 COMPULSO
RY
BABEDTMELAN
PEDAGOGY OF
LANGUAGE
3 0 1 2.5
GRAND TOTAL
30
185
COURSE STRUCTURE FOR SEMESTER VII
OPTION II: B.ED. SECONDARY
S.N. NATURE SUBJECT
CODE
SUBJECT TITLE LECTU
RE
TUTORI
AL
PRACTIC
AL
CREDI
TS
1 COMPULSO
RY
BABEDEDUC13
PHILOSOPHICAL,
SOCIOLOGICAL AND
POLITICAL PERSPECTIVE
4 0 1 5
2 COMPULSO
RY
BABEDEDUC14
THE LEARNER NATURE
AND DEVELOPMENT
4 0 1 5
3 COMPULSO
RY
BABEDEDUC15
THEORY OF
INSTRUCTIONAL
TECHNOLOGY AND
EVALUATION
4 0 1 5
4 COMPULSO
RY
BABEDEDUC16
SCHOOL ORGANISATION
AND MANAGEMENT
4 0 1 5
5 &
6
TWO OF
TEN
BABED-TMS
ENG
BABED-TMS
HIS
BABED-TMS
HIN
BABED-TMS
PBI
BABED-TMS
GEO
BABED-TMS
ECO
BABED-TMS
SST
BABED-TMS
MAT
BABED-TMS
POL
BABED-TMS
SOC
TEACHING OF ENGLISH
TEACHING OF HISTORY
TEACHING OF HINDI
TEACHING OF PUNJABI
TEACHING OF
GEOGRAPHY
TEACHING OF
ECONOMICS
TEACHING OF SOCIAL
STUDIES
TEACHING OF
MATHEMATICS
TEACHING OF POLITICAL
SCIENCE
TEACHING OF
SOCIOLOGY
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
GRAND TOTAL
30
186
OPTION I: B. Ed. (Elementary) COURSE
PAPER I: BABED-EDUC13: THEORY OF EDUCATION
PHILOSOPHICAL, SOCIOLOGICAL AND POLITICAL PERSPECTIVE
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester the student teacher will be able to
• explain the discipline of education in philosophical and sociological and political
perspective
• describe the relationship between the discipline of philosophy and education
• discuss the educational philosophy of some reputed thinkers.
• analyse the new trends in education.
• be aware of current acts in education.
Unit I
Philosophy: major schools of philosophy and their educational implications: Idealism,
Naturalism, Pragmatism and Existentialism
Unit II
Contribution of western educational thinkers
Plato, Rousseau, Dewey
Unit III
Goals and values of emerging Indian society
a) Democracy
b) National integration and international understanding
Unit IV
a) Political issues and education: historical background with special reference to human
rights (universal declaration of human rights, latest Indian act with regard to human
rights). Education for all: Implications of article 21A. Right of children: free and
compulsory education 2009
b) Problems and issues: Education in 21st century: planning, globalization and quality
education
Unit V
187
New trends in education:
a) Human resource development : man power planning and utilization of manpower
b) Role and functions of UNESCO.
c) Role and functions of UNICEF.
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include
• power point presentations on the national issues.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper at the end of the session consisting of ten questions. The
students will be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60
marks: 3 credits)
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term
papers and seminars (20 marks: 1 credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Suggested Readings:
1. Aggarwal, J.C. (2003), Theories and Principles of Education. Vikas Publishing House
Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi.
2. Bhatia, K.K. and Narang C.L. (2002), Philosophical and sociological Bases of
Education. Tandon Publications Ludhiana.
3. Sataya, R.N and Shaida, B. D. (1996), Development of Educational Thought and
Practice. Dhanpat Rai Publishing Company, New Delhi.
4. Taneja, V.K.(1998), Foundation of Education. Morinda Capital Publisher, Panchkula.
5. Sharma, K.K. (2006), Philosophical and Sociological Bases of Education. Bharat Book
Centre, Ludhiana.
6. Sodhi, T.S. (2007), Philosophical and Sociological Bases of Education. Bawa
Publications, Patiala.
7. Sachdeva, M.S. (2000), A new approach to Philosophical and Sociological Bases of
Education. Bharat Book Centre, Ludhiana.
8. Dash, B.N. (2000), Principles of Education. Neelkamal Publications, Hyderabad.
9. Walia, J.S. (2008), Philosophical and Sociological Bases of Education. Paul
Publishers, Jalandhar.
PAPER II: BABED-EDU14: THE LEARNER - NATURE AND DEVELOPMENT
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
188
Objectives
At the end of the semester the pupil teachers will be able to:
• identify the variables involved in teaching learning process so as to infer their role in
making instructions effective.
• explain the various dimensions of personality of an individual.
• describe the role of education in nurturing the creativity
• explain the importance of mental health and ways and means to improve the mental
health.
Course content
Unit I
Personality: concept, dimensions, theories of personality (Type, Trait, Type -cum- Trait
theories), assessment of personality
Unit II
Intelligence; concept, theories of Intelligence (Spearman, Thurston, Guilford, Gardner ),
Concepts of IQ , EQ and SQ, measurement of Intelligence
UNIT III
Learning: meaning, factors, theories (Trial and Error, Classical conditioning, Skinner
Operant Conditioning, Insight theory of learning), transfer of learning, motivation
UNIT IV
Creativity: meaning, process, assessment of creativity, role of education in enhancement of
creativity
Unit V
Mental health: concept and factors affecting mental health, importance of mental health,
maintaining mental health of students
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include
• administration and interpretation of psychological tests: Personality.
• to study a pupil from an elementary school with reference to any one of the following
i) study habits
ii) behavioral problems
iii) interest
iv) attitude
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper at the end of the session consisting of ten questions. The
students will be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60
marks: 3 credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term
papers and seminars (20 marks: 1 credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
189
Suggested Readings:
1. Kulshreshtha, S.P. (1997), Educational Psychology. R Lall Book Depot Meerut.
2. Aggarwal, J.C. (1999), Elementary Educational Psychology. Doaba House Delhi.
3. Mangal, S.K. (2009), Educational Psychology. Parkash Brothers, Ludhiana.
4. Aggarwal, J.C. (2004), Essentials of Educational Psychology. Vikas Publishing House.
5. Sharma, R.A. (2002), Fundamentals of Educational Psychology. R.Lall Book Depot Meerut.
6. Mathur, S.S.(1998), Educational Psychology. Vinod Pustak Bhandar, Agra.
7. Bhatia, K.K. (2006), Bases of Educational Psychology. Tandon Publishers, Ludhiana.
8. Chauhan, S.S. (2007), Advanced Educational Psychology. Vikas Publishers, Noida.
PAPER III: BABED-EDU15: THEORY OF INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND
EVALUATION
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
After the instructional programme is over, the student teacher will be able to :
• explain the principles of instructional design and apply them to develop design of
instruction.
• describe different media and integrate with instructional programme.
• explain the concept, process and application of team teaching, group interaction ,
symposium and penal discussion.
• discuss the need, concept and principles of self instruction programme.
• explain and analyze the latest trends in evaluation.
Course content
Unit I
Principles of instructional design: objectives, formulation, content selection and organization
design of instruction (basic model of instruction) content acquisition
Unit II
Media: types of Media: mechanical and electronic media, characteristics, use of media.
Integrating media with instructional design
Unit III
Group discussion: nature, concept and use of team teaching, group discussion, symposia
and presentations, oral performance
Unit IV
• Self instructional designs: programmed instruction , types of programmed instructionlinear,
branching and Mathetics programmes
• Computer assisted instruction: concept, applications, advantages, Limitations
Unit V
Trends in evaluation
Concept and principles of measurement and evaluation, defects in external examination with
reference to secondary education in India, characteristics of good tool of evaluation, recent
190
trends in examination reforms, semester system, grading system, continuous internal
assessment
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include:
• development of a design for different instructional goals with the content of their choice
and integrating media with it .
• each student will be required to submit at least 50 frames in a linear programme.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper at the end of the session consisting of ten questions. The
students will be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60
marks: 3 credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term
papers and seminars (20 marks: 1 credit)
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Suggested readings
1. Bhushan, A. & Ahuja, M. (2003), Educational Technology. Second edition, Bawa Publishers,
Patiala.
2. Chauhan, S.S.(1978), A Textbook of Programmed Instruction. Sterling Publishers, New
Delhi.
3. Das, R.C. (1993), Educational Technology: A Basic Text. Sterling Publishers. New Delhi.
4. Unwin, D. & McAlease, R. (1978), The Encyclopedia of Educational media,
Communications and technology. West port, Greenwood Press.
5. Ahuja, M. (2007), Mastery learning. Vivek Publishers , Meerut.
6. Mehra, V. (2004), Innovations in Educational Technology. S.S. Publishers, New Delh
PAPER IV: BABED-EDU16: SCHOOL MANAGEMENT
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
The pupil teachers will be able to
• explain the basis of School Organization and Management.
• describe the various components of school complex.
• identify skills for effective classroom management.
• explain and analyze inter-relationships and psychological environment in the schools.
Course Content
Unit I
191
Elements of school management: planning, organizing, direction, control, coordination and
budgeting
Unit II
School complex: concept, two tier system, objectives of school complex, powers of school
complex committee, monitoring and evaluation service
Unit III
School management: concept, need and scope of school management. Teachers as leaders
and managers, characteristics, leadership style, role and importance of principal, delegation
of powers
Unit IV
Inter-relationship and psychological environment in the schools
• principal- teacher relationship
• teacher- teacher relationship
• teacher- parent involvement
• student- teacher involvement
• student- student relationship
Concept of discipline causes of indiscipline and their remedies
Unit V
Class room management: concept, principles of classroom management, classroom
management problems, solution of classroom problems, approaches to classroom
management, factors affecting classroom management, role of teachers in classroom
management
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include
• survey of causes of indiscipline among elementary school students, a small sample
from neighboring elementary school may be selected.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
(iv) Theory paper at the end of the session consisting of ten questions. The students will
be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3 credits).
(v) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers
and seminars (20 marks: 1 credit).
(vi) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Suggested Readings
8) Aggarwal, J.C.(2004), Elementary Education & Teacher Education. Doaba
Publication, Delhi.
9) Walia, J.S.(2004), School Administration & Organization. Paul Publication,
Jalandhar.
10) Bhatia,K.K.(2001), Teaching Learning Process. Tandon Publication, Ludhiana.
192
11) Sodhi, T.S. & Suri, A. (2002), Management of School Education. Bawa
Publications, Patiala.
12) Sachdeva, M.S. (1992), A New Approach to School Management. Vinod
Publications, Ludhiana.
13) Walia, J.S. (2001), Foundations of School Administration and Organization. Bright
Publishers, Jallandhar.
PEDAGOGY OF SCHOOL SUBJECTS (B.Ed. ELEMENTARY)
PAPER V: BABED-TMENSC: PEDAGOGY OF NATURAL SCIENCE
Marks (Credits)
Total = 50 (2.5)
Theory = 30 (1.5)
Sessional Work = 10 (0.5)
Internal Assessment = 10 (0.5)
Objectives:
At the end of semester, student teachers will be able to:
• explain the place and importance of natural science in the school curriculum.
• identify the aims and objectives of teaching science.
• discuss and use different methods, devices and techniques of teaching science.
• use variety of learning experiences and instructional material and media while
teaching science.
• describe planning and organization of teaching science.
• explain and use various procedures of evaluation.
Course content
Unit I
Impact of science and technology on modern living, instructional objectives of teaching
science
Curriculum – meaning, principles of science curriculum construction
Unit II
Approaches and methods of teaching natural science – lecture demonstration method,
project method, problem solving and inductive deductive approach
Unit III
Instructional media – need and importance, classification, selection and integration of media
in teaching learning process (use of chalk board, flannel boar, charts, models, overhead
projectors, T.V. and computers)
Unit IV
Need and importance of practical work in science, improvisation of science apparatus,
laboratory equipment and material , selection purchase, maintenance and safety measures
Unit V
193
Evaluation in science: concept, characteristics of good evaluation tool, evaluation in theory
and practical test construction, analysis and interpretation. Construction of lesson plan in
science: need, importance, steps, essentials of a good lesson plan
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include:
• development of lesson plan in Science.
• student teachers will be required to submit a teaching aid useful in the teaching of science.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper at the end of the session will consist of ten questions. The
students will be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (30
marks: 1.5 credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term
papers and seminars (10 marks: 0.5 credit)
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (10 marks: 0.5 credit).
Suggested readings
1. Sharma, R.C. (1999), Modern Science Teaching. Dhanpat Rai Pub.Co, New Delhi.
2. Kohli, V.K. (1999), How to Teach Science. Vivek Publishers., Ambala.
3. Mangal, S.K. (1997), Teaching of Science. Arya Book Depot, New Delhi
4. Narendera, V. (2000), The Impact & Science Teaching. Oxford & IBH Pub.Co, New
Delhi.
5. Siddiqi, N.N. and Siddiqi, M.N.(2000), Teaching of Science Today and Tomorrow.
Doaba House, Delhi.
6. Vishin, G.L. and Ticku, S.P(1998-99), A New Approach to Teaching of Science. Vinod
Publication, Ludhiana
PAPER VI: BABED-TMESSC: PEDAGOGY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE
Marks (Credits)
Total = 50 (2.5)
Theory = 30 (1.5)
Sessional Work = 10 (0.5)
Internal Assessment = 10 (0.5)
Objectives
At the end of semester, pupil teachers will be able to
• explain the nature and concept of social science.
• identify various methods, device and techniques of teaching social sciences at
various levels.
• identify and use variety of learning experiences and instructional materials in
teaching of social science
• describe the various innovative techniques of evaluation used in teaching social
science.
Course content
194
Unit I
Social science: concept, nature and scope, rationale for a social studies programme at the
elementary school
Aims and objectives of teaching social science
Unit II
Principles of organizing social science curriculum
Approaches of organizing social science curriculum – concentric, topical and unit approach
Unit III
Need importance, and use of audio visual aids – chalk board , flannel board , bulletin board,
maps, globe, pictures, models, charts, graphs, time lines, over head projector, flash cards,
scrap book, exhibition
Social science room – need and importance and equipment
Unit IV
Devices and techniques of teaching social studies – exposition, explanation, narration,
description, illustration, questioning, assignment, seminar and field trip
Unit V
Evaluation
Evaluation procedures used in teaching of social science, types of questions, diagnostic
approach and remedial teaching used in teaching social science
Construction of lesson plan in social science-need, importance, steps and essentials of a
good lesson plan
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include
• development of lesson plan in social studies
• student teachers will be required to submit a teaching aid useful in the teaching of social
studies.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper at the end of the session consisting of ten questions. The
students will be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (30
marks: 1.5 Credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term
papers and seminars (10 marks: 0.5 Credit)
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (10 marks: 0.5 Credit).
Books Suggested
1. Shaida, B.D.(1962), Teaching of Social Studies. Panjab Kitab Ghar, Jalandhar.
2. Kochhar, S.K.(1983), Teaching of Social Studies. New Delhi: Sterling
Publications, New Delhi.
3. Kohli, A.S.(1996), Teaching of social studies. Anmol Publishers, New Delhi.
4. Taneja , V.K.(1992), Teaching of Social Studies. Vinod Publishers, Ludhiana.
195
5. Aggarawal, J.C. (1982), Teaching of Social Studies. Vikas Publishers, New
Delhi.
6. Wesly, E.B. (2000), Teaching of Social Studies. D.C. Herth and Co, Boston.
PAPER VII: BABED-TMEMAT: PEDAGOGY OF MATHEMATICS
Marks (Credits)
Total = 50 (2.5)
Theory = 30 (1.5)
Sessional Work = 10 (0.5)
Internal Assessment = 10 (0.5)
Objectives
At the end of semester, the student teachers will be able to
• identify and use various methods and models of teaching mathematics.
• describe the use of various teaching aids in teaching mathematics.
• explain the concept of evaluation and prepare various tools of evaluation.
Course content
Unit 1
What is mathematics; patterns, reasoning, generalizations, nature of mathematical
statements – axioms and postulates, explanations and proofs, necessity and efficiency
Unit II
Pedagogical considerations in geometry, practical arithmetic, number, algebra, data
handling and statistics, ratio and proportional reasoning
Unit III
Methods and approaches of teaching mathematics
Inductive – deductive
Experimental – laboratory
Analytical – synthetic
Mastery learning strategy: concept, importance, process, types, learning outcomes, use of
remediation and enrichment
Unit IV
Communicating mathematics: activity, graphical methods–construction, measurement,
modeling, computation. Use of teaching aids in mathematics: charts, chalkboard, slides,
filmstrips, video film, comp
Unit V
Evaluation
Achievement tests (norm referenced and criterion referenced test)
Speed test and power test
Diagnostic test and remedial work
Construction of lesson plan in mathematics – need, importance, principle,
steps, essentials of a good lesson plan
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include
• development of lesson plan in mathematics.
196
• student teachers will be required to submit a teaching aid useful in the teaching of
mathematics.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper at the end of the session will consist of ten questions. The
students will be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (30
marks: 1.5 Credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term
papers and seminars (10 marks: 0.5 Credit)
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (10 marks: 0.5 Credit).
Suggested Readings :
1. Arora, S.K. (2000), How to teach Mathematics. Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd,
New Delhi.
2. Gakhar, S.C. & Jaidka M.L.(2003), Teaching of Mathematics. M/s
N.M.Publishers, Panipat.
3. Kumar, K. & Kaur, J. (2004), Learning Mathematics Lab Experience 21st
Century. Publications, Patiala.
4. Mangal, S.K.(2003), Teaching of Mathematics. Tandon Publications, Ludhiana.
5. Sidhu, K.S.(1998), Teaching of Mathematics. Sterling Publications Pvt Ltd, New
Delhi.
6. Kumar, S. & Ratan , P.N. (2003), Teaching of Mathematics. Anmol publications
Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
PAPER VIII: BABED-TMELAN:PEDAGOGY OF LANGUAGE
Marks (Credits)
Total = 50 (2.5)
Theory = 30 (1.5)
Sessional Work = 10 (0.5)
Internal Assessment = 10 (0.5)
Objectives:
The pupil teachers will be able to
• Describe the various approaches for planning of successful language teaching.
• prepare instructional materials, projects, teaching aids, tasks and tests for
effective teaching.
• explain various methods of teaching English.
• explain the concept of evaluation in English.
Course content
Unit I
Language – nature and importance, objectives, maxims, principles of teaching language
Unit II
Developing language skills – listening and speaking
Teaching listening skills
197
Identification of sounds
Understanding syntactic patterns
Teaching/speaking skills
Teaching of presentation skills
Poetry
Dramatization
Paper reading
Extempore
Making short speeches
Unit III
Developing language skills: reading and writing
a) Intensive and extensive reading
b) Teaching writing to beginners – choice of script, materials, techniques of copying from
blackboard, flash cards, substation table, dictation and spelling
Unit IV
Material and teaching aids
Audio visual aids to language teaching- advantages of audio- visual aids, black board, charts,
pictures, flash cards, tape recorder, radio films, gramophone, television , OHP, LCD
projector, computers
Unit V
Evaluation of learning outcomes in languages: Taxonomy of tests, discrete point and
integrative tests, communicative testing, participatory evaluation
Lesson planning: importance of planning work, how to make a lesson plan
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include:
• student teachers will be required to submit a teaching aid useful in the teaching of
Language.
• for interactive teaching and learning, student teachers will be given experience in
language lab.
• development of lesson plan in teaching of language.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper at the end of the session will consist of ten questions. The
students will be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (30
marks: 1.5 Credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term
papers and seminars (10 marks: 0.5 Credit)
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (10 marks: 0.5 Credit).
Books Recommended:
1. Allen, W.S. (1967), Living English Structure. Longman, London.
198
2. Bhandari, C.S. (1999), Teaching English. Orient Longmans, New Delhi.
3. Bhatia, K.K. (1999), Teaching and learning English as Foreign language. Kalyani
Publishers, Ludhiana.
4. Billows, F.L. (1961), The Techniques of Language Teaching. Longmans, London.
5. Cyclostyled notes for teachers of English produced by the Regional Institute of English,
Chandigarh.
6. Dodson, C.J. (1972), Language teaching and the Bi-Lingual Method. Pitam Publishing,
London.
TEACHING SUBJECTS (B.Ed. SECONDARY)
TEACHING OF ENGLISH
BABED-TMS ENG
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Hours = 44
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the pupil teacher will be able to:
• describe the nature and characteristics of language.
• explain and evaluate basic language skills such as listening, speaking, reading and writing
and integrate them for communicative purposes.
• explain the important methodologies and techniques of teaching English.
• prepare and use appropriate audio visual teaching aids for effective teaching of English.
COURSE CONTENT
Unit I
1. Teaching of English in India today
a) Importance of English in India
b) Conditions under which English is taught and learnt, declining standards and
suggested remedies
2. Nature of language
a) Linguistic principles
b) General principles of teaching and learning a language.
Unit II
Methods and approaches of teaching of English
1. Grammar -translation method
2. Direct method
3. Bilingual method
4. Structural –situational approach
199
Unit III
1. Teaching of listening skills
a) Identification of sounds
b) Understanding syntactic pattern
c) Identifying information
d) Identifying emotional /attitudinal tone
2. Teaching of speaking skills
i. Teaching of presentation skills (communication language Teaching approach)
a) Poetry Recitation
b) Dramatization
c) Declamation
d) Paper reading
e) Extempore
f) Role playing
Unit IV
Developing language skills: Reading and Writing
1. Teaching reading skills
a) Teaching mechanics of reading
b) Teaching reading to beginners (methods)
c) Teaching reading comprehension
2. Teaching writing skill
a) Mechanics of writing
b) Teaching writing to beginners
c) Teaching of composition from controlled to free practices
d) Creative writing
Unit V
Lesson planning and evaluation
1. Lesson planning
Macro lesson – prose, poetry, story, grammar and composition
2. Audio-visual aids
a) Essential qualities of teaching aids – with special reference to OHP, LCD projector, computers
3. Evaluation
a) Types of test and characteristics of a good test
b) Development of test items for testing language activities in English
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include:
• development of lesson plan.
• student teachers will be required to submit a teaching aid useful in the teaching of English.
Evaluation Scheme
200
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The
students will be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks:
3 Credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual
term papers and seminars (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance,
classroom interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
Suggested Readings:
1. Bhandari, C.S. & others (1966), Teaching of English: a Handbook for Teachers. Orient Long
mans, New Delhi.
2. Bhatia, K.K. (2006), Teaching and Learning English as a Foreign Language. Kalyani
Publishers, New Delhi.
3. Bindra, R. (2005), Teaching of English. Radha Krishan Anand and Co., Jammu.
4. Bright, J.A. & McGregor, G.P. (1981), Teaching English as a Secondary Language.
Longmans, ELBS.
5. Carroll, B.J. (1972), Systems and Structures of English. Oxford University Press, London.
6. Doff, A. (1988), Teach English: A Training Course for Teachers. The British Council and
Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
7. French, F.G. (1963), Teaching English as an International Language. OUP, London.
8. Gokak, V.K. (1963), English in India, Its Present and Future. Asia Publishing House, New
Delhi.
9. Hornby, A.S. (1962), Teaching of Structural Words and Sentence Patterns. OUP, London.
10. Kohli, A.L. (1999), Techniques of Teaching English. Dhanpat Rai and Company, New Delhi.
11. Wadhwa, S.S. (2006), Teaching of English in India. National Book Depot, Kapurthala.
12. Sahu, B.K.(2004), Teaching of English. Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana.
TEACHING OF HISTORY
BABED-TMS HIS
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
OBJECTIVES
At the end of the semester, the student teacher will be able to
• describe the scope and importance of history.
• construct and analyze critically the curriculum of teaching history at secondary stage.
• explain different methods of teaching history.
• prepare and use teaching aids such as maps, models, charts, graphics, time-lines and
computer.
COURSE CONTENTS
UNIT I
a) Meaning, nature, scope and importance of history as a subject
b) Aims, objectives and values of teaching history at secondary level
201
c) Relation of history with other school subjects (social sciences and physical sciences)
UNIT II
a) Principles of curriculum construction and different approaches to construct curriculum in
history
i. Chronological or periodical
ii. Concentric
iii. Topical
b) Need and importance of good text book, criteria for selection of good text book and critical
analysis of history text book at secondary stage
UNIT III
Methods of teaching history
a) Story telling method
b) Lecture method
c) Discussion method
d) Source method
e) Project method
UNIT IV
a) Need, importance, preparation and use of teaching aids
b) Types of teaching aids
i. Audio-tape recorder, radio
ii. Visual-black board, charts, graphs, maps, globe, models, specimens, time-line,
excursions and field trips, still movies, museum, diagram, bulletin board, flannel board,
film strips. Some specific A.V. aids : Epidiascope, overhead projector, films, computer
iii. History room, history teacher
UNIT V
Evaluation and planning instruction in history
a) Need, importance and concept of evaluation including continuous comprehensive evaluation
b) Elements of a lesson plan and contents analysis of a topic in term of knowledge, skills and
attitudes in teaching of history
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include:
• development of lesson plan in History.
• student teachers will be asked to submit a teaching aid useful in the teaching of History.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The
students will be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks:
3 Credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual
term papers and seminars (20 marks: 1 Credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance,
classroom interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 Credit).
202
Books Suggested
1. Tyagi, G., Nigam, V.& Verma, J.K. (2000), Teaching of History. Vinod Pustak Mandir, Agra.
2. Kochhar, S.K. (1998), Teaching of History. Sterling Publisher, New Delhi.
3. Yadav, N. (2001), Teaching of History. Anmol Publications, New Delhi.
4. Sharma, S. (2004), Teaching of History. Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi.
5. Dash, B.N.(2003), Teaching of History. Neelkamal Publishers, Hyderabad
6. Sayeed, N.H (2001), Teaching of History. Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi.
TEACHING OF HINDI
BABED-TMS HIN
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
fgUnh Hkk"kk f'k{k.k
y{; %
1- Hkkoh f'k{kdksa esa fgUnh f'k{k.k ds fy, Hkk"kk lEcU/h vk/kjHkwr ;ksX;rkvksa dk fodkl
djukA
2- Hkkoh f'k{kdksa esa fgUnh Hkk"kk f'k{k.k lEcU/h ;ksX;rkvksa dk fodkl djukA
3- Hkkoh f'k{kdksa esa fgUnh f'k{kksijkUr visf{kr dq'kyrkvksa dk fodkl djukA
4- Hkkoh f'k{kdksa esa fgUnh lEcU/h fofHkUu d{kksÙkj Hkkf"kd ,oe~ lkfgfR;d fØ;kvksa ds
vk;kstu dh {kerk dk fodkl djukA
5- lgk;d lkexzh ds fuekZ.k ,oe~ iz;ksx dh dq'kyrk dk fodkl djukA
izFke bdkbZ %
(d) Hkk"kk&vFkZ] vk/kj ,oa izd`fr
([k) nsoukxjh fyfi dh fo'ks"krk,a ,oa lhek,¡
(x) fgUnh Hkk"kk dk egÙo&ekr`Hkk"kk ,oe~ jk"Vªh; Hkk"kk ds :i esa
(?k) fgUnh f'k{k.k ds lkekU; ,oe~ Lrjkuqdwy (fof'k"V) mn~ns';
(M-~) Hkk'kk f'k{k.k ds lkekU; fl¼kUr ,oa lw=k
f}rh; bdkbZ %
(d) cksypky dh f'k{kk&egÙo mn~ns'; ,oa fof/;k¡
([k) mPpkj.k dh f'k{kk&egÙo] mPpkj.k nks"k ds dkj.k] mik;
(x) O;kdj.k f'k{k.k&egÙo] mn~ns'; ,oa fof/;k¡
(?k) ys[ku f'k{k.k&egÙo] mnns'; ,oa fof/;k¡
r`rh; bdkbZ %
(d) x| f'k{k.k&mn~ns';] lksiku ,oe~ fof/;k¡
([k) i| f'k{k.k&mn~ns';] lksiku ,oe~ fof/;k¡
(x) okpu f'k{k.k&mn~ns';] okpu eUnrk ds dkj.k ,oa mik;
prqFkZ bdkbZ %
(d) n`';&JO; lk/u&iz;ksx ,oa egÙo
([k) ikB~;&iqLrd dh fo'ks"krk,¡ ,oa fgUnh f'k{k.k esa ikB~;&iqLrd dk egÙo
(x) Hkk"kk f'k{k.k esa iqLrdky; dh mi;ksfxrk
(?k) fgUnh vè;kid ds xq.k
iape bdkbZ %
(d) fgUnh esa ewY;kadu ,oa ijh{kk,¡&vfHkizk;] egÙo o fofo/ izdkj
([k) x`gdk;Z&Lo:i] la'kks/u izfØ;k ,oa fof/;k¡
203
(x) iz'u i=k fuekZ.k&vkn'kZ iz'u i=k ds fl¼kUr
(?k) lw{e&f'k{k.k&vfHkizk; ,oa dkS'ky&vuq'khyu iz'u dkS'ky] O;k[;k dkS'ky] mn~nhiu
ifjorZu dkS'ky] n`"Vkar O;k[;k dkS'ky] iqucZye dkS'ky
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include:
• development of lesson plan in hindi.
• student teachers will be asked to submit a teaching aid useful in the teaching of Hindi.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will
be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3 credits)
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term
papers and seminars (20 marks: 1 credit)
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 credit)
iqLrd lwph %
1- [kUuk] T;ksfr (2009)] fgUnh f'k{k.k] /uirjk; ,.M dEiuh] ubZ fnYyhA
2- 'kekZ] Mh- ds- (1999)] fgUnh f'k{k.k fof/;ka] V.Mu ifCyds'kut] yqf/;kukA
3- jeu fcgkjh yky (1996&97)] fgUnh f'k{k.k] jLrksxh ,.M dEiuh] esjBA
4- 'kekZ] Mh- ,y- (1992), fgUnh f'k{k.k] nso ukxj izdk'ku] t;iqjA
5- HkkfV;k ds-ds- vkSj ukjax] lh- ,y- (1989)] vk/qfud fgUnh fof/;ka] izdk'k czntZ ifCy'kj]
yqf/;kukA
6- flUgk izlkn 'k=kqèu (1964)] fgUnh Hkk"kk dh f'k{k.k fof/] fnYyh iqLrd lnu] iVukA
7- izlkn ds'ko (1976)] fgUnh f'k{k.k] /uirjk; ,.M lUl] fnYyhA
8- lQk;k j?kqukFk (1986&97)] fgUnh f'k{k.k fof/] iatkc fdrkc ?kj] tkya/jA
9- lwn fot; (1997)] fgUnh f'k{k.k fof/;k¡ V.Mu ifCys'ku] yqf/;kukA
10- flag lkfo=kh (1997)] fgUnh f'k{k.k] yk;y cqd fMiks] esjB
11- {kf=k; ds (1968)] ekr`Hkk"kk f'k{k.k] fouksn iqLrd efUnj] vkxjkA
12- thr ;ksxsUnz HkkbZ (1972)] fgUnh f'k{k.k] fouksn iqLrd efUnj] vkxjkA
13- oekZ] oS/ukFk izlkn (1973)] fgUnh f'k{k.k] i¼fr] fcgkj fgUnh xzUFk vdkneh] iVukA
14- t; tloUr flag (1975)] vk/qfud fgUnh f'k{k.k] i¼fr] U;w cqd dEiuh] tkyU/jA
TEACHING OF PUNJABI
BABED-TMS PBI
gzikph Gkôk dh f;Zfynk ftXh
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
T[d/ô L -
1a ftfdnkoEh nfXnkgeK B{z Gkôk, gzikph Gkôk ns/ r[ow[yh fbZgh pko/
w[ZYbk frnkB d/Dk.
2a wks Gkôk d/ f;Zfynk d/ T[d/ôK ns/ f;XKsK dh ;'Mh eokT[Dk.
204
3a Gkôk j[BoK ns/ fefonktK dh ;[uZih tos'A ns/ nfGnk; eoB ftu
;jkJh j'Dk.
4a ;?ezvoh ôq/DhnK bJh fBoXkfos gzikph gkm ;wZroh ftu'A wjZstg{oB
B[efsnK dh u'D eoB ftu ;jkfJsk eoBk.
5a gzikph Gkôk d/ nfXnkgB s/ w[bKeD d/ toswkB gZXo B{z T[u/ok
u[ZeD bJh ;koEe ;[Mkn d/Dk.
6a ;kfjs d/ ftfGzB o{gK-ejkDh, eftsk, b/y nkfd d/ nfXnkgB YzrK
pko/ ikDekoh d/Dk.
7a pZfunK nzdo g[;sewkbk ftZu Ik e/ Gkôk ;zpzXh frnkB gqkgs eoB dh
o[uh g?dk eoBk.
8a gzikph ;kfjs Bkb ;KM T[sgzB eoB bJh ftfdnkoEh nfXnkgeK nzdo
gq/oBk g?dk eoBk.
gkm ;wZroh LfJekJh
- 1
1a Gkôk dh gqfeqsh ns/ T[sgsh d/ f;XKs.
2a gzikph Gkôk dk fBek; s/ ftek;.
3a fbgh d/ noE, r[ow[yh fbgh dh gqkuhBsk s/ nB[e{bsk.
4a f;Zfynk d/ y/so ftu wks-Gkôk dh f;Zfynk d/ T[d/ô ns/
wjZst.
fJekJh - 2
1a Gkôk f;Zfynk ftu ;[DB ns/ ;wMD dk wjZst, ;[BD ôesh d/
ftek; Bjh b'VhAd/ nfGnk;.
2a p'bukb dh f;Zfynk dk wjZst, nô[ZX T[ukoD d/ ekoB ns/
;[Xko, w"fye fefonktK (tkoskbkg, tkd-fttkd, GkôD, ejkDh
;[BkT[Dk).
3a gVQBk f;ykT[D dhnK w[Zy ftXhnK ns/ gVQkJh f;Zfynk dhnK
fe;wK-;{yw gVQkJh s/ ;p{b gVQkJh (T[Zuh gkm s/ w'B gkm)
4a fbyD ebk dk wjZst, fbyDk f;ykT[D dhnK ntZ;EktK, ftXhnK ns/
fbysh ezw.
fJekJh-3
1a eftsk dh f;Zfynk - eftsk gVQkT[D d/ T[d/ô ns/ ftXhnK.
2a tkose dh f;Zfynk-T[d/ô ns/ ftXhnK.
3a ôpdktbh dh f;Zfynk dhnK ftXhnK, nô[ZX i'VK d/ ekoB ns/
;[Xko.
4a ftnkeoD dh f;Zfynk-ftXhnK s/ GkôkJh wjZssk.
fJekJh-4
1a wks-Gkôk dh gkm g[;se-wjZst, ftô/ôsktK ns/ nkb'uBk.
2a Gkôk g[;sekbk-wjZst s/ gVQB o[uhnK dk ftek;.
3a fdqôNh-;q's ;jkfJe ;kXB, fe;wK s/ gq:'rh wjZst.
fJekJh-5
1a Gkôk :'rsktK dk w[bKeD-nkX[fBe XkoBk, wjZst, gqhfynk ns/
w[bKeD ftu coe, w[bKeD d/ ;kXB ns/ gqôBK dhnK fe;wK.
2a gkm :'iBk-T[d/ô ns/ fsnkoh (eftsk, ejkDh, fBpzX, ftnkeoD,
tkose)
3a Gkôk f;Zfynk dk nfXnkge.
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include:
205
• development of lesson plan in Punjabi.
• student teachers will be asked to submit a teaching aid useful in the teaching of Punjabi.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will
be required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3 credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term
papers and seminars (20 marks: 1 credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
;jkfJe g[;seK L
1. gzikph Gkôk, ftnkeoD ns/ pDso L gzikph :{Bhtof;Nh, gfNnkbk.
2. gzikph ôpd o{g ns/ ôpd i'V e'ô L vka joehos f;zx.
3. wks-Gkôk dh f;Zfynk ftXh L vka i;tzs f;zzx i;.
4. gzikph Gkôk s/ ;kfjs nfXnkge L vka fJzdod/t f;zx Bzdok.
5. gzikph ;kfjs dh T[sgsh ns/ ftek; - feogkb f;zx e;/b, gofwzdo f;zx,
r'fpzd f;zx bKpk bkj"o p[Ze ôkg, b[fXnkDk.
6. wZXekb dh u'Dt] gzikph eftsk - vkH gqhsw f;zx (;zgkH) gpbhe/ôB
fpT{o', uzvhrVQ.
7. gzikph nfXn?B d/ w[Yb/ ;zebg - ihs f;zx i'ôh, tko; ôkj ckT{Av/ôB,
nzfwqs;o - 1999
8. gzikph Gkôk fbgh ns/ ftnkeoB-vkH ôod/t f;zx frZb b'erhs gqekôB, 2006
TEACHING OF GEOGRAPHY
BABED-TMS GEO
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, pupil teacher will be able to:
• explain and use various methods of teaching geography.
• explain the principles governing construction of geography.
• explain the use different audio-visual aids involved in teaching of geography.
• explain the concept of evaluation in geography.
COURSE CONTENTS
UNIT I
a) Meaning, nature and scope of geography: importance of geography as school subject
b) Aims and objectives of teaching of geography: correlation with other school subjects-history,
mathematics, science, civics, arts, economics and languages
UNIT II
Methods of teaching geography
a) Lecture method
b) Discussion method
206
c) Project method
d) Direct method
e) Excursion method
f) Laboratory method
UNIT III
a) Geography textbooks: need and importance, qualities of good text books
b) Need and importance of audio-visual aids, preparation and use of teaching aids, chalk
boards, flannel board, radio, T.V., maps , globe, graphs, film strips, V.C.R., overhead
projectors, slide projectors, LCD projectors
c) Need and importance of geography and its equipments
UNIT IV
a) Geography teacher: qualities and functions
b) Role of geography in developing national and international outlook
c) Local geography: meaning and importance
UNIT V
a) Evaluation of geography, modern concept , need and importance
b) Different types of test: essay type, short answer type and objective type
c) Writing of lesson plans in geography-micro and macro lesson plans.
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include:
• development of lesson plan in geography.
• student teachers will be asked to submit a teaching aid useful in the teaching of geography.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will be
required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3 credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers
and seminars (20 marks: 1 credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Suggested Readings:
1. Aggarwal, D.D. (2000), Modern Method of Teaching Geography. Sarup and sons
Publishers, New Delhi.
2. Arora, K.L. (1989), Teaching of Geography. Prakash Brothers, Ludhiana. (in Punjabi,
English, Hindi).
3. Basha, S.A.,& Salim (2004), Teaching of Geography (Hindi). A.P.H Publisher, Delhi.
4. Kaul, A.K. (2000), Why and How of Geography Teaching. Vinod Publisher, Ludhiana.
5. Rao, M.S. (1999), Teaching of Geography. Anmol Publisher Pvt Ltd, New Delhi
6. Singh, R.P. (2004), Teaching of Geography. R.Lall Book Depot, Meerut.
7. Yogesh, K.S. (2004), Teaching of Geography (Hindi). A.P.H. Publisher, Delhi.
207
8. Shaida, B.D., & Sharma, J.C. (2002), Teaching of Geography. Dhanpat Rai & Sons,
Jalandhar.
9. Siddiqui, M.H. (2001). Teaching of Geography. A.P.H. Publisher, New Delhi.
10. Zaidi, S.M. (2004). Modern Teaching of Geography. Anmol Publisher, New Delhi.
TEACHING OF ECONOMICS
BABED-TMS ECO
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the pupil teachers will be able to:
• describe concept, principles and theories of economics.
• explain aims and objectives of teaching of economics.
• explain different methods of teaching, devices and techniques of evaluation.
• explain the use of different teaching aid involved in teaching of economics.
COURSE CONTENT
UNIT I
a) Importance of teaching of economics
b) Aims and objectives of teaching of economics
c) Correlation of economics with mathematics, statistics, history, geography, science, political
science, commerce and sociology
UNIT II
a) Principles of constructing curriculum of economics
b) Approaches of organization of material of economic curriculum
i) Unit
ii) Concentric
iii) Tropical
c) Critical analysis of economics syllabus at the secondary and senior secondary stage
UNIT III
Methods of Teaching
a) Lecture method
b) Source method
c) Discussion method
d) Problem method
e) Project method
f) Survey method
g) Inductive-Deductive method
UNIT IV
a) Economics text book (importance and qualities)
b) Teacher of economics- importance, qualities and competence
c) Teaching aids – meaning, importance and types
208
Use of chalk board, flannel board, diagrams, charts, table graphs, pictures, O.H.P., T.V., films,
computer with multimedia, flash cards, L.C.D. projector
UNIT V
a) Evaluation – meaning and importance of evaluation
b) Tools of evaluation-oral tests, written tests, essay type tests, short answer type tests and
objective type tests
c) Lesson planning-meaning, characteristics, importance and steps
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include:
• development of lesson plan in Economics.
• student teachers will be asked to submit a teaching aid useful in the teaching of Economics.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will be required to
attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3 credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers and
seminars (20 marks: 1 credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom interactions, etc.
(20 marks: 1 credit).
Books recommended:
1. Dhillon, S. & Chopra,K. (2002), Teaching of Economics. Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana.
2. Mukherjee, S. (2004), Teaching of Economics. Prakashan Kendra, Lucknow.
3. Sidhu, H.S. (2002), Teaching of Economics. Tandon Publishers, Ludhiana.
4. Yadav, A. (2005), Teaching of Economics. Anmol Publication, New Delhi.
5. Aggarwal , J.C. (2005), Teaching of Economics-A Practical Approach. Vinod Pustak Mandir,
Agra.
6. Sharma, S. (2004), Modern Teaching Economics. Anmol Publication Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi.
7. Mishra, B.K.& Mohanty, R.K. (2004), Teaching of Economics. R.Lal Book Depot, Meerut.
8. Singh Y. (2005), Aratha Shaster Sikshan, Ashish Publication. New Delhi.
TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES
BABED-TMS SST
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the pupil teachers will be able to:
• explain the aims and objectives of teaching social studies.
• explain different methods, devices and techniques of teaching social studies.
• analyze modern concepts and tools of evaluation.
209
• prepare and make effective use of teaching aids.
COURSE CONTENTS
UNIT I
a) Meaning, nature, scope and importance of social studies
b) Aims and objectives of teaching of social studies
c) Relationship of social studies with other subjects- mathematics, commerce, science, arts and
languages
UNIT II
a) Principles of organizing social studies curriculum
b) Approaches of organizing social studies curriculum-concentric, topical and unit approach
c) Critical evaluation of existing curriculum of social studies at secondary stage
UNIT III
a) Methods of teaching social studies-story telling, lecture, discussion, source problem solving
and project method
b) Devices and techniques of teaching of teaching social studies –exposition, explanation,
narration, description, illustration, questioning, assignment, seminar, supervised study and
field trip
UNIT IV
a) Need, importance and use of audio visual aids – chalk board, flannel board, bulletin board,
maps, globe, pictures, models, charts, graphs, time lines, over head projector, flash cards,
scrap book, exhibition, radio, TV and computers
b) Social studies teacher– qualities and role in changing times
UNIT V
a) Evaluation in social studies – modern concept, importance and tools; preparation blue print
and writing objective based test items
b) Lesson plan – need, importance and steps of writing it in teaching of social studies
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
Individualized sessional work which will include:
• development of lesson plan in social studies.
• student teachers will be asked to submit a teaching aid useful in the teaching of social studies.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will be
required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3 credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers
and seminars (20 marks: 1 credit ).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Books Recommended:
1. Singh, G. & Kaur, J. (2007), Teaching of Social Studies. Kalyani Publications, Ludhiana.
210
2. Shaida, B.D. (1962), Teaching of Social Studies. Panjab Kitab Ghar, Jalandhar.
3. Kochhar, S.K. (1983), Teaching of Social Studies. Sterling Publications, New Delhi.
4. Kohli, A.S. (1996), Teaching of Social Studies. Anmol Publications, New Delhi.
5. Taneja, V.K. (1992), Teaching of Social Studies. Vinod Publications., Ludhiana.
6. Aggarwal, J.C. (1982), Teaching of Social Studies. Vikas Publications, New Delhi.
7. Wesley, E.B. (2000), Teaching of Social Studies. D.C. Herth and Co, Boston.
8. Mottart & Maurice,P. (2004), Elementary social Studies Instructions. Longman, Green and Co,
New York.
9. Mittal, H.C. (2006), Teaching of Social Studies. Dhanpat Rai & Chandna R.N. sons, Ludhiana.
10. Sidhu, H.S. (2004), Teaching of Social Studies. Tandon Publishers, Ludhiana.
11. Dash, B.N. (2004), Content-cum-Method of Teaching of Social Studies. Kalyani Publishers,
New Delhi.
12. Mehta, D.D. (2004), Teaching of Social Studies. Tandon Publishers, Ludhiana.
TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS
BABED- TMS MAT
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives:
At the end of the semester, the student teachers will be able to:
• explain the nature of mathematics.
• describe the principles governing the construction of the curriculum of mathematics.
• explain the differences between various tools of evaluation.
• describe the specific qualities of mathematics teacher.
UNIT I
a) Meaning and nature of mathematics
b) Values and role of mathematics in Life
c) Objectives of teaching mathematics at the secondary school stage and formation of objectives
in behavioral domain (B.S. Bloom's Taxonomy)
UNIT II
a) Principles of curriculum constructions – selection and organization
b) Difference between examination, evaluation and measurement
c) Constructing test item – essay type, objectives type and objective based questions
UNIT III
a) Method of teaching – analytic, synthetic, laboratory, inductive, deductive and problem solving
b) Evaluation of mathematics text book
UNIT IV
a) Present status of teaching of mathematics in our school and steps to be taken for its
improvement
b) Teaching aids in mathematics
c) Qualities of mathematics teacher
UNIT V
211
a) Lesson planning – meaning, importance and steps of lesson planning
b) Formation of macro lesson plan.
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include:
• development of lesson plan in mathematics.
• student teachers will be asked to submit a teaching aid useful in the teaching of mathematics.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will be
required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3 credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers
and seminars (20 marks: 1 credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Books recommended:
1. Arora, S.K. (2000), How to teach Mathematics. Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
2. Gakhar, S.C. & Jaidka, M.L. (2003), Teaching of Mathematics. N.M. Publishers, Panipat.
3. Kumar, K. & Kaur, J. (2004), Learning Mathematics-Lab Experience. 21st Century, Patiala
Publications, Patiala.
4. Mangal, S.K. (2003), Teaching of Mathematics. Tandon Publications, Ludhiana.
5. N.C.E.R.T. Text books 6th to 10th Standard.
6. Sidhu, K.S. (1998), Teaching of Mathematics. Sterling Publications Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi.
7. Ratan, S. (2003), Teaching of Mathematics. Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi.
TEACHING OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
BABED-TMS POL
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, pupil teacher will be able to:
• describe the importance of teaching of political science as a subject.
• analyze critically the curriculum of the political science at secondary stage.
• analyze different methods of teaching political science.
• explain the use of different audio-visual aids and latest information technologies.
• explain and analyze different techniques of evaluation in political science.
Course content
Unit I
a) Meaning, nature, scope and importance of teaching of political science as a subject
b) Aims and objectives of teaching of political science at secondary level
212
c) Relation of teaching of political science with other school subjects
Unit II
a) Curriculum organization: principles of curriculum construction and critical study of existing
curriculum of teaching of political science in any school class and methods of organizing
material –concentric, topical, unit and chronological approach
b) Methods of teaching political science: story telling, lecture, discussion, source, problem
solving and project method
Unit III
a) Devices of teaching political science: assignments, questioning, illustrations, exposition,
narration and description
b) Need, importance and use of audio-visual aids, chalk boards, display boards, maps, globes,
models, charts, graphs, time line, over head projectors, specimen, field trips, flashcards,
exhibition, computers, TV and radio
Unit IV
a) Political science teacher: qualities and role in changing times
b) Political science text book : need, importance and qualities
c) Utilizing current events and community resource in teaching of political science
Unit V
a) Evaluation in political science: modern concept, importance and types; preparing blue prints,
writing objectives based test items
b) Lesson plan- need, importance and steps of writing it in teaching of political science
Teaching Learning Experiences
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include:
• development of lesson plan in political science.
• student teachers will be asked to submit a teaching aid useful in the teaching of political
science.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will be
required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3 credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers
and seminars (20 marks: 1 credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Books recommended:
1. Shaida, B.D. (1962), Teaching of Political Science. Punjab Kitab Ghar, Jalandhar.
2. Bhatia, K.K. (2000), Teaching of Social Studies. Tandon Publications, Ludhiana.
3. Syed, M.H.(2004), Modern Teaching of Civics/Political Science. Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd.,
New Delhi.
4. Chopra, J.K.(2005), Teaching of Political Science. Commonwealth Publishers, New Delhi.
5. Sidhu,H.S.(1994), Teaching of Social Studie. Tandon Publications, Ludhiana.
TEACHING OF SOCIOLOGY
213
BABED-TMS SOC
Marks (Credits)
Total = 100 (5)
Theory = 60 (3)
Sessional Work = 20 (1)
Internal Assessment = 20 (1)
Objectives
At the end of the semester, the pupil teacher will be able to:
• explain the aims and objectives of teaching sociology.
• explain different methods and techniques of teaching sociology.
• describe the use of different audio-visual aids in teaching of sociology.
• explain different techniques of evaluation.
Course content
Unit I
a) Meaning, nature, scope and importance of sociology in modern context
b) Relation of sociology with other subjects, political science, history, literature (languages),
psychology and geography
c) Aims, objectives and values of teaching sociology
Unit II
a) Principles of construction curriculum of sociology
b) Approaches of organization of sociology curriculum
i) Unit
ii) Concentric
iii) Topical
c) Critical analysis of sociology syllabus at the senior secondary stage
Unit III
Methods of teaching
1. Lecture method
2. Discussion method
3. Project method
4. Source method
5. Problem method
6. Survey method
Unit IV
a) Sociology text-books: importance and qualities, supplementary material
b) Teacher of sociology – importance, qualities and competence
c) Teaching aids: meaning, importance and types
d) Use of chalkboard, charts, picture, O.H.P., T.V. films, computer, radio, maps, globes, graphs
Unit V
a) Evaluation- meaning, modern concept, importance and types; preparing blue-print and writing
objective based test items
b) Lesson plan: need, importance and steps of writing it in teaching of sociology
Teaching Learning Experiences
214
In this paper, 60% academic transactions will be teacher directed by way of lectures,
discussions and presentations. The remaining portion will be covered in the form of
individualized sessional work which will include:
• development of lesson plan in sociology.
• student teachers will be asked to submit a teaching aid useful in the teaching of sociology.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper will consist of ten questions two from each unit. The students will be
required to attempt one question from each of the five units (60 marks: 3 credits).
ii) Supervised sessional work: project work, team presentations, individual term papers
and seminars (20 marks: 1 credit).
iii) Internal assessment based on terminal examinations, attendance, classroom
interactions, etc. (20 marks: 1 credit).
Suggested Readings:
1. Bottomorl, T.B. (1975), Introduction to Sociology. Blackie and Dans, Bombay.
2. Rao, C.N. (2005), Sociology- Primary Principles. S.C. Chand and Company Ltd, Delhi
3. Dharma, R.N. (2001), Samajshastra ka Sidhant. Atlantic Publishers, New Delhi.
4. Giddens, A. (2001), Sociology: A text book for the Nineties. Polity Publishers, London.
5. Syed, M.H.(2004), Modern Teaching of Civics/Political Science. Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd.,
New Delhi.
215
B.A. Hons. (Edu.) B.Ed.
Semester VIII (Session 2011-12)
COURSE STRUCTURE FOR SEMESTER VIII
OPTION I: B.ED ELEMENTARY
S.No NATURE SUBJECT
CODE
SUBJECT TITLE LECTU
RE
TUTORI
AL
PRACTIC
AL
CREDI
TS
1 COMPULSO
RY
BABED-PPI
T01
REPORT OF VISIT TO
CENTER OF INNOVATION
IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
EDUCATION
1 0 1
IN
FIELD
0.5
2 COMPULSO
RY
BABED-PPI
T02
DOCUMENT AND TEXT
ANALYSIS
1 0 1 0.5
3 COMPULSO
RY
BABED-PPI
T03
DEMONSTRATION
LESSONS
2 0 2 1
4 COMPULSO
RY
BABED-PPI
T04
OBSERVATION OF
DEMONSTRATION
LESSONS
2 0 2
IN
FIELD
1.5
5 COMPULSO
RY
BABED-PPI
T05
DEVELOPING UNIT PLANS
1 0 1 0.5
6 COMPULSO
RY
BABED-PPI
T06
SUPERVISED TEACHING
PRACTICE
2 0 6
IN
FIELD
20
7 COMPULSO
RY
BABED-PPI
T07
RECORD KEEPING
1 0 1
IN
FIELD
0.5
8 COMPULSO
RY
BABED-PPI
T08
SWOT ANALYSIS AND
IDENTIFICATION OF
PROBLEM CHILDERN
1 0 2
IN
FIELD
0.5
9 COMPULSO
RY
BABEDCOMC
84
COMPUTER EDUCATION 3 0 2
IN LAB
5
GRAND TOTAL
30
216
OPTION I: B. Ed. (Elementary) COURSE
Marks: 600
Credits: 30
PEDAGOGY PRACTICE & INTERNSHIP PROGRAMME
The school Internship programme is envisioned to offer an intense and focused school
experience. Structured to be a process in partnership between the school and the intern, the
programme seeks to provide psychological space for evolving innovations in teaching. While
functioning as a regular teacher, the intern gets the opportunity to translate the knowledge
base, pedagogic theory, and understanding of children and the repertoire of skills into
reflective classroom practice. The school benefits from this alliance in terms of witnessing
possibilities of unconventional pedagogies.
Objectives
After the course is over, the students will be able to
• develop a comprehensive understanding of existing classroom practices.
• develop a critical understanding of textbook lessons of individual subjects and their
suitability for learning.
• draw linkages between various pedagogy courses and classroom practices.
• critically review policy and state documents on education and seek to effect ideas into
classroom practices.
• develop and design alternative teaching – learning materials.
• assess factors that contribute to a classroom culture , its creation and maintenance.
• explore possibilities of innovation and create space for alternative practices.
• design, choose , organize , and conduct individual and group activities.
• reflect on personal experiences of classroom management.
• to learn to set realistic goals in terms of children’s learning, classroom management,
curricular form and content and pedagogic practices.
• to develop the ability to innovate within existing frameworks by alternative practices.
• to purposefully use the skills of systematic observations, record keeping and for
reflection on teaching-learning process.
TASKS
Students will take up the following tasks in VIII Semester.
Task I: Report of visit to center/s of Innovation in Elementary School Education
(Marks = 10, Credit = 0.5)
BABED-PP1 T01
Students in groups of 4-6 will visit one centre of innovation practice in elementary School
education. The aim is to expose students to the practice of innovation in diverse settings:
rural, urban, formal, nonformal etc. This could include detailed observations of alternative
practices as well as trying innovative approaches with children.
217
Task II: Document and text analysis. (Marks = 10, Credits = 0.5)
BABED-PP1 T02
a) To study significant issues in National Curriculum Framework documents, Policy
documents and other relevant official documents of education.
b) To critically review elementary school textbooks in order to understand the
progression of concepts; the requirement of diverse learning opportunities for
individual learning capacities and pace; conceptual demands, scope for spiral
learning.
c) To undertake a comparative study of state curriculum and an alternative developed
with in the country or outside.
Task III Demonstration Lessons (Marks = 20, Credits = 1.0)
BABED-PP1 T03
Task IV Observation of Demonstration Lessons (Marks = 30, Credits = 1.5)
BABED-PP1 T04
Task V Developing Unit Plans (Marks = 10, Credits = 0.5)
BABED-PP1 T05
Task VI: Supervised Teaching Practice (Marks = 400, Credits = 20, 40 working days)
BABED-PPI T06
40 lessons, each to be supervised and evaluated for 10 marks.
Teaching in elementary classes will involve teaching of four subjects (pedagogy papers)
Task VII
BABED-PP1 T07
Record Keeping (Marks = 10, Credit = 0.5) Spread over teaching practice and
internship schedule
• Regular written records of the lesson plans
• Observation of lessons (minimum ten distributed lessons)
Task VIII
BABED-PP1 T08
SWOT Analysis and Identification of problem children (Marks = 10, Credit = 0.5)
• Identification of needs of individual children including mentally and physically
challenged children “labeled” as failures and children with specific learning disabilities.
• Identification of infrastructural problems with in the school such as broken blackboard,
broken furniture, inadequacy of space, drinking water, etc and providing appropriate
individual and school level solutions.
Supervisory support
Interns will work under the professional guidance and facilitation of faculty supervisors.
Supervision will be provided at two levels.
218
a) General in terms of teaching learning process, classroom organization, management and
planning.
b) Subject supervision in terms of Language, Mathematics and Environmental Science at the
primary level.
Supervision visits need to be worked out amongst the faculty. The supervisors would follow
agreed upon appropriate formats for recording observations of interns and evaluation
parameters and criteria. More specifically, the supervisors will:
• act as a mediator between the intern and the course vision and curriculum.
• help to establish liasion between the intern and the cooperating (regular) teacher of
the school.
• facilitate the intern to reflect on the classroom practices, the struggle with
unconventional practices, matter of classroom discipline, translating ideas/ plans into
effective practice and clarifying concept to be taught.
Evaluation
• classroom observations : knowledge base
• regular supervision : oral and written communication
• rotators supervision : culture of learning,
choice of activities and materials,
sensitivity towards need of children,
class room management,
description of classroom practices,
analysis and reflection of experiences,
quality of development in the intern’s reflection,
conceptual clarity and an understanding of the
linkage between classroom practice and
theory,
summative report
• unit plans : appropriateness of the activities and materials used,
organization and time allotment,
method of introduction and summing up,
use of various skills
COMPUTER EDUCATION
BABED-COMC 84
Total Marks(Credits)= 100 (5)
External Theory (Credits)= 60 (3)
Practical (Credits)= 40 (2)
Hours = 25
After the instructional programme is over, the pupil teacher will be able to
• understand different parts of computer and their functions.
• understand various computer applications.
• run different software on computer.
• describe internet and its uses.
• able to use computer for enhancing teacher learning process.
COURSE CONTENTS
UNIT I
Computer revolution – its application in various fields
219
Generations of computer
UNIT II
Classification of the computers
Computer hardware: Input-Output Devices, Memory: Primary& Secondary
UNIT III
Characteristics of various computer languages: MLL / Assembly / HLL/4GL
Introduction to:
i) Operating Systems
ii) Compiler and Interpreter
UNIT IV
Features of applications software
Word Processor
Spreadsheets
Presentations
Data Base Management Systems
Internet Surfing, working with E-mail and chat
PRACTICAL
Total Marks (credits)= 40 (2)
Working Knowledge Marks(Credits) =10(0.5)
File and floppy/CD of one teaching lesson plan Marks (Credits)= 10 (0.5)
Viva-voice Marks (Credits)= 10 (0.5)
Internal Evaluation Marks (Credits)= 10(0.5)
Switching ON and OFF the PC and Basic of DOS
(MD, CD, RD, DEL, COPY CON, TYPE, EDIT, DIR, COPY, REN, CD.)
Use of following packages in creating web pages (Front page) MS-WORD, MS-EXCEL,MSPOWERPOINT,
MS-ACCESS, MS-PUBLISHER.
Internet Surfing, working with E-mail and chat
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
i) Theory paper at the end of the session consisting of eight questions two from each unit. The
students will be required to attempt one question from each of the four units (60 marks: 3
Credits).
ii) Practical work will carry 40 marks (2 Credits).
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Rajaraman, (2002), Fundamentals of Computer. Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
2. Subramanian, N.(2004), Introduction to Computers (Fundamentals of Computer Science).
Tata McGraw Hill., New Delhi.
3. Sinha, P.K. (2006), Computer Fundamentals. BB Publishers, New Delhi.
4. Sharma, L. (2006), Computer Education. Wintech Publications, Ferozepur Cantt.
5. Michael, M.A.(1994),New Communications Technologies. Focal Press, Boston.
6. Kumar,K.& Kumar,S.(2004),Computer Education. GBD Publications, Gurusar Sadhar.
The students will be given experience in the following areas: Black board writing,
drawing & sketching, art & craft, motto writing, action drawing, preparation of teaching
aids, display of pictures on display board, collage making etc.
220
Semester VIII
B.A. Hons. (Edu.) B.Ed.
COURSE STRUCTURE FOR SEMESTER VIII
OPTION II: B.ED SECONDARY
S.No NATURE SUBJECT
CODE
SUBJECT TITLE LECTU
RE
TUTORI
AL
PRACTIC
AL
CREDI
TS
1 COMPULSO
RY
BABED-PPI
T10
DOCUMENT AND TEXT
ANALYSIS
1 0 1
0.5
2 COMPULSO
RY
BABED-PPI
T11
DEMONSTRATION
LESSONS
2 0 2 1
3 COMPULSO
RY
BABED-PPI
T12
OBSERVATION OF
DEMONSTRATION
LESSONS
0 0 2
IN
FIELD
1.5
4 COMPULSO
RY
BABED-PPI
T13
DEVELOPING UNIT PLANS
1 0 1
IN
LIBRA
RY
0.5
5 COMPULSO
RY
BABED-PPI
T14
SUPERVISED TEACHING
PRACTICE
2 0 6
IN
FIELD
20
6 COMPULSO
RY
BABED-PPI
T15
OBSERVATION AND
REPORTING OF
STUDENT’S BEHAVIORS
TO IDENTIFY THE
PROBLEMS OF
ADOLOSCENCE
1 0 2
IN
FIELD
0.5
7 COMPULSO
RY
BABED-PPI
T16
RECORD KEEPING 1 0 1
IN
FIELD
0.5
8 COMPULSO
RY
BABED-PPI
T17
SWOT ANALYSIS AND
IDENTIFICATION OF
PROBLEM CHILDERN
1 0 2
IN
FIELD
0.5
9 COMPULSO BABED- COMPUTER EDUCATION 3 0 2 5
221
RY COMC 84 IN LAB
GRAND TOTAL
30
OPTION II: B. Ed. (Secondary) COURSE Marks: 600
Credits: 30
PEDAGOGY PRACTICE AND INTERNSHIP PROGRAMME
The school Internship programme is envisioned to offer an intense and focused school
experience. Structured to be a process in partnership between the school and the intern, the
programme seeks to provide psychological space for evolving innovations in teaching. While
functioning as a regular teacher, the intern gets the opportunity to translate the knowledge
base, pedagogic theory, and understanding of children and the repertoire of skills into
reflective classroom practice. The school benefits from this alliance in terms of witnessing
possibilities of unconventional pedagogies.
Objectives
After the course is over, the students will be able to
• develop a comprehensive understanding of existing classroom practices.
• develop a critical understanding of textbook lessons of individual subjects and their
suitability for learning.
• draw linkages between various pedagogy courses and classroom practices.
• critically review policy and state documents on education and seek to effect ideas into
classroom practices.
• develop and design alternative teaching – learning materials.
• assess factors that contribute to a classroom culture , its creation and maintenance.
• explore possibilities of innovation and create space for alternative practices.
• design, choose , organize , and conduct individual and group activities.
• reflect on personal experiences of classroom management
• to learn to set realistic goals in terms of children’s learning, classroom culture and
management, curricular form and content and pedagogic practices.
• to develop the ability to innovate within existing frameworks by alternative practices.
• to purposefully use the skills of systematic observations, record keeping and for
reflection on teaching-learning process.
TASKS
The students will take up following tasks in VIII Semester
222
Task I: Document and text analysis (Marks = 10, Credits = 0.5)
BABED-PP1 T10
a) To study significant issues in National Curriculum Framework documents, Policy
documents and other relevant official documents of education.
b) To critically review secondary school textbooks in order to understand the progression
of concepts; the requirement of diverse learning expenses opportunities for individual
learning capacities and pace; conceptual demands, scope for spiral learning.
c) To undertake a comparative study of state curriculum and an alternative developed
with in the country or outside.
Task II Demonstration Lessons (Marks = 20, Credits = 1)
BABED-PP1 T11
Task III Observation of Demonstration Lessons ( Marks = 30, Credits = 1.5)
BABED-PP1 T12
Task IV Developing Unit Plans ( Marks = 10, Credit = 0.5)
BABED-PP1 T13
Task V: Supervised Teaching Practice ( Marks = 400, Credits = 20, 40 working days)
BABED-PP1 T14
Teaching in secondary classes will involve teaching of two subjects (pedagogy papers)
Task VI Observation and reporting of students’ behaviors to identify the problems of
adolescence (Marks = 10, Credits = 0.5)
BABED-PP1 T15
Task VII
BABED-PP1 T16
Record Keeping (Marks = 10, Credits = 0.5) Spread over teaching practice and
internship schedule
• Regular written records of the lesson plans.
• Observation of lessons (minimum ten distributed lessons)
Task VIII
BABED-PP1 T17
SWOT Analysis and Identification of problem children ( Marks = 10, Credits = 0.5)
• Identification of needs of individual children including mentally and physically
challenged children “labeled” as failures and children with specific learning disabilities.
• Identification of infrastructural problems with in the school such as broken blackboard,
furniture, inadequacy of space, drinking water, etc and providing appropriate individual
and school level solutions.
223
Supervisory support
Interns will work under the professional guidance and facilitation of faculty supervisors.
Supervision will be provided at two levels.
a) General in terms of teaching learning process, classroom organization management and
planning.
b) Supervision in terms of teaching subjects at secondary level.
Supervision visits need to be worked out amongst the faculty. A minimum of two supervisory
visits per week are recommended. The supervisors would follow agreed upon appropriate
formats for recording observations of interns and evaluation parameters and criteria. More
specifically, the supervisors will:
• act as a mediator between the intern and the course’s vision and curriculum.
• help liaise between the intern and the cooperating (regular) teacher of the school.
• facilitate the intern to reflect on her classroom practices, his/her struggle with
unconventional practices, matter of classroom discipline, translating ideas/ plans into
effective practice and clarifying concept to be taught.
Evaluation
• classroom observations : knowledge base
• regular supervision : oral and written communication
• rotators supervision : culture of learning,
choice of activities and materials,
sensitivity towards need of children,
class room management,
description of classroom practices,
analysis and reflection of experiences,
quality of development in the intern’s reflection,
conceptual clarity and an understanding of the
linkage between classroom practice and
theory,
summative report
• Unit plans : appropriateness of the activities and materials used,
organization and time allotment,
method of introduction and summing up,
use of various skills
COMPUTER EDUCATION
BABED-COMC84
Total Marks(Credits)= 100 (5)
External Theory (Credits)= 60 (3)
Practical (Credits)= 40 (2)
Hours = 25
After the instructional programme is over, the pupil teacher will be able to
• understand different parts of computer and their functions.
• understand various computer applications.
• run different software on computer.
• describe Internet and its uses.
• able to use computer for enhancing teacher learning process.
224
COURSE CONTENTS
UNIT I
Computer revolution – its application in various fields
Generations of computer
UNIT II
Classification of the computers
Computer hardware: Input-Output Devices, Memory: Primary& Secondary
UNIT III
Characteristics of various computer languages: MLL / Assembly / HLL/4GL
Introduction to:
iii) Operating Systems
iv) Compiler and Interpreter
UNIT IV
Features of applications software
Word Processor
Spreadsheets
Presentations
Data Base Management Systems
Internet Surfing, working with E-mail and chat
PRACTICAL
Total Marks (credits)= 40 (2)
Working Knowledge Marks(Credits) =10(0.5)
File and floppy/CD of one teaching lesson plan Marks (Credits)= 10 (0.5)
Viva-voice Marks (Credits)= 10 (0.5)
Internal Evaluation Marks (Credits)= 10(0.5)
Switching ON and OFF the PC and Basic of DOS
(MD, CD, RD, DEL, COPY CON, TYPE, EDIT, DIR, COPY, REN, CD.)
Use of following packages in creating web pages (Front page) MS-WORD, MS-EXCEL,MSPOWERPOINT,
MS-ACCESS, MS-PUBLISHER.
Internet Surfing, working with E-mail and chat.
Evaluation Scheme
The evaluation will be based on:
iii) Theory paper at the end of the session consisting of eight questions two from each unit. The
students will be required to attempt one question from each of the four units (60 marks: 3
Credits).
iv) Practical work will carry 40 marks: 2 Credits
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
1. Rajaraman, (2002). Fundamentals of Computer. Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
2. Subramanian, N.(2004), Introduction to Computers (Fundamentals of Computer Science).
Tata McGraw Hill., New Delhi.
3. Sinha, P.K. (2006), Computer Fundamentals. BB Publishers, New Delhi.
4. Sharma, L. (2006), Computer Education. Wintech Publications, Ferozepur Cantt.
5. Michael, M.A.(1994), New Communications Technologies. Focal Press, Boston.
6. Kumar,K.& Kumar,S.(2004),Computer Education. GBD Publications, Gurusar Sadhar.
225
The students will be given experience in the following areas: Black board
writing, drawing & sketching, art & craft, motto writing, action drawing, preparation of
teaching aids, display of pictures on display board, collage making etc.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
IF U DIDN'T GOT , WHAT UR LUKING FOR REQUEST US BY CONTACTING US CLICK ON CONTACT US!