Thursday, 11 August 2011

SYLLABUS FOR REVISED STUDY AND EVALUATION SCHEME FROM 1 st TO IV th SEMESTER MASTER OF ENGINEERING PROGRAMME REGULAR AND MODULAR PROGRAMME IN COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING OF PUNJAB UNIVERSITY, CHANDIGARH

1. Duration of the Programmes
i) For Regular M.Tech./M.E. Programmes
The normal duration of M.Tech./ME programmes including Thesis will be 2 academic years
(4 semesters). The maximum period of completion of the programme including Thesis shall
be 4 academic years (8 semesters). 2 years (4 semesters) extension in genuine hardship cases
is allowed by the Vice-Chancellor of Panjab University, Chandigarh for submission of thesis.
ii) For Modular M.Tech. /M.E. Programmes
The normal duration of Modular M.Tech. / M.E. Programmes including Thesis will be 3
academic years, (6 spells, each spell of 5 weeks duration including Saturdays/ &
Sundays). The maximum period of completion of the programme including Thesis shall
be 6 academic years (12 spells). 2 years (4 spells) extension in genuine hardship cases is
allowed by the Vice-Chancellor of Panjab University, Chandigarh for submission of
thesis.

2. Number of Papers allowed in a Semester/Spell
i) For M.Tech./M.E. Regular Programmes
All students will be required to qualify twelve theory papers and twp practical papers during
the course. No student will be allowed to qualify more than five theory and one practical
paper at the end of first semester and not more than ten theory and two practical papers
(including the papers passed in the first semester), at the end of second semester or first year.
Two papers will be offered in the 3rd semester.
ii) For M.Tech./M.E. Modular Programmes
All students will be required to qualify 12 theory and two practical papers during the course.
No student will be allowed to qualify more than two papers at the beginning of the 2nd spell
and not more than four papers (including the papers passed in the beginning of IInd spell) at
the beginning of 3rd spell and so on.
3. Conditions for Appearing in End-Semester Examination
i) Periodic Tests (for M. Tech./ ME Regular Programmes)
Every student has to appear in two periodic tests as decided by the Institute and must qualify
the same. There will be only one make-up test for those students who are unable to appear in
one or both mid-semester tests due to genuine reasons to the satisfaction of Coordinator.
Students, whose performance in the class-tests & sessionals is not satisfactory, are liable to
be detained by the Director from appearing at the University Examinations. The detailed
rules of the University Examinations are available at Panjab University, Chandigarh and all
students are advised to get the latest copy for guidance and further information.
ii) Periodic Tests (for M. Tech./ME Modular Programmes)
Every student has to appear in one periodic test as decided by the Institute and must qualify
the same. There will be only one make-up test for those students who are unable to appear in
the test due to genuine reasons to the satisfaction of Coordinator.
Students, whose performance in the test/sessional is not satisfactory, are liable to be detained
by the Director from appearing at the University Examinations. The detailed rules of the
University Examinations are available at Panjab University, Chandigarh and all students are
advised to get the latest copy for guidance and further information.
4. Examination and Result (For M. Tech. / ME Programmes both Regular
and Modular)
• Minimum marks to pass examination: 50% in the sessional in each subject and 40% in each
theory paper. Both the theory and sessional marks will be considered independent of each
other. Aggregate pass percentage will be 50%
• Weightage in each subject 50 marks : Sessional
100 marks : Final Theory Examination
• The students who obtain in first attempt 75% or more of the aggregate marks in both theory
and sessionals and also if the thesis has been adjudged to merit distinction are awarded
First Division with Distinction. If the thesis has not been adjudged to merit distinction then
the students are awarded first division.
• The students who obtain 60% or less than 75% of the aggregate marks in all theory papers
and the sessionals are awarded First Division.
• The students who obtain less than 60% of the aggregate marks in ail the theory papers and
the sessionals\s but not less than 40% in each theory paper and 50% in the sessionals will
be awarded Second Division.
Preliminary Thesis/Thesis
Four neatly typed or printed copies of Thesis properly bound, shall be submitted to Panjab
University through Guide and ME Cell of the institute (in case of NITTTR students).
Scheme for ME CSE
First Semester
Second Semester
Sr.No Course
No.
Course Title L T P Total Theory Sessional Total
1. CSE 8101 Advance Algorithms 4 - - 4 100 50 150
2. CSE 8102 Network
Technologies
4 - - 4 100 50 150
3. CSE 8103 Computer Vision and
Image Processing
4 - - 4 100 50 150
4. CSE 8104 Advanced Computer
Architecture
4 - - 4 100 50 150
5. CSE 8105 Database
Technologies
4 - - 4 100 50 150
6. CSE 8106 Software Lab-I - - 6 6 -- 100 100
Total 20 - 6 26 500 350 850
Sr.No Course
No.
Course Title L T P Total Theory Sessional Total
1 CSE 8201 Data warehousing &
Data Mining
4 - - 4 100 50 150
2 CSE 8202 Research
Methodology
4 - - 4 100 50 150
3 CSE 8203 Software Testing and
Quality Management
4 - - 4 100 50 150
4 CSE 8204 Software Lab-II - - 6 6 -- 100 100
5 Branch Elective – I
CSE 8205 Parallel and Distributed
Computing
CSE 8206 Network Security
CSE 8207 Modeling & Simulation
4 - - 4 100 50 150
6 Branch Elective –II
CSE 8208 Open Source Software
CSE 8209 Multimedia System
Design
CSE 8210 Soft Computing
4 - - 4 100 50 150
7. Research Seminar - - 2 2 - 100 100
Total: 20 - 8 28 500 450 950
Third Semester
Sr.No. Course
No.
Course Title L T P Total Theory Sessional Total
1 Elective III
CSE 8301 Natural Language
Processing
CSE 8302 Grid Computing
CSE 8303 Machine Vision
CSE 8304 Information Retrieval
CSE 8305 Wireless Networks
4 - - 4 100 50 150
2 Elective –IV
CSE 8306 Project Management
CSE 8307 Business Process Re-
Engineering
CSE 8308 Technology
Management
CSE 8309 Human Resources
Development and Training
Methods
4 - - 4 100 50 150
3 CSE 8310
Thesis work preliminary
- - 18 18 -- 100 100
Total 8 - 18 26 200 200 400
Fourth Semester
Sr.
No
Course No. Course Title L T P Total Theory Sessional Total
1 CSE 8401 Thesis/Dissertation - - 25 25 -- 100 100
Total - - 25 25 -- 100 100
Note:
1. The requirement for the award of ME is successful completion of 12 theory courses, 2
practical courses and satisfactory completion of thesis.
2. In the third semester, a student will take any two subjects from the electives.
3. No External Numerical marks are to be assigned to the thesis work. It is either “Accepted” or
“Rejected” in the external theory exams. Quality of Work reported in thesis can be graded in
terms of “Very Good”, “Good” or “Average”

b) M. TECH/ME MODULAR PROGRAMMES
In Modular programme, there are a total of 12 theory, each of 150 marks (including sessional of 50 marks),
two practical subjects, each of 100 sessional marks, a research seminar of 100 sessional marks, a preliminary
thesis based research work of sessional 150 marks, and thesis work of 250 sessional marks, a total of 2500
marks. A candidate will study 02 theory subjects each in first to six spells and 2 practical papers one each in
3rd and 4th spell; preliminary thesis based research work in fifth spell, and thesis work in sixth spell. The
courses of study and evaluation scheme for M. Tech/ ME Modular programme are the same as described for
M. Tech./ME Regular programme and is detailed here:
Spell - 1
Code No. Subject L T P Total Theory Session
al
Total
Subject - 1 3 2 - 5 100 50 150
Subject - 2 3 2 - 5 100 50 150
Software Lab-1 - - 3 3 - - -
Total 6 4 - 10 200 100 300
Spell - 2
Code No. Subject L T P Total Theory Sessional Total
Subject - 1 3 2 - 5 100 50 150
Subject - 2 3 2 - 5 100 50 150
Software Lab-1 - - 3 3 - 100 100
Total 6 4 - 10 200 200 400
Spell - 3
Code No. Subject L T P Total Theory Sessional Total
Subject - 1 3 2 - 5 100 50 150
Subject --: 2 3 2 - 5 100 50 150
Software Lab-II - - 3 3 - - -
Total 6 4 - 10 200 100 300
Spell - 4
Code No. Subject L T P Total Theory Sessional Total
Subject - 1 3 2 - 5 100 50 150
Subject - 2 3 2 - 5 100 50 150
Software Lab-II - - 3 3 - 100 100
Research Seminar - - 2 2 - 100 100
Total 6 4 2 12 200 300 500
Spell - 5
Code No. Subject L T P Total Theory Sessional Total
. Subject - 1 3 2 - 5 100 50 150
Subject - 2 3 2 - 5 100 50 150
Thesis-Preliminary - - 15 15 - 100 100
Total 6 4 15 25 200 200 400
Spell - 6
Code No. Subject L T P Total Theory Sessional Total
Subject - 1 3 2 - 5 100 50 150
Subject - 2 3 2 - 5 100 50 150
Thesis Work - - 25 25 - 100 100
Total 6 4 25 35 200 200 400
ADVANCE ALGORITHMS
Paper Code: CSE 8101
L T P : 4 0 0
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: - Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions, at least two from each section.
Objectives: This course will provide the in-depth knowledge of different algorithm design methodologies and the
various research concepts involved
SECTION – A
Models of Computation and Algorithms
Stored program model, Random Access Machines and Turing machines, Algorithms and their complexity,
Performance analysis: - Time and space complexity, asymptotic notation. Analyzing recursive algorithms
using recurrence relations: Substitution method, Recursion-tree method, Master method.
(7)
Divide and Conquer, and Greedy Algorithm Design Methodologies
Introduction, Quick sort, Strassen’s matrix multiplication, Minimum spanning tree, Single source shortest
path problem and their performance analysis.
(8)
Branch-and-Bound, and Lower Bound Theory
Introduction, 0-1 knapsack problem, Traveling salesman problem, comparison trees for sorting, searching
and merging.
(7)
SECTION – B
Dynamic Programming and Backtracking Algorithm Design Methodologies
Introduction, Traveling salesperson problem, Knapsack problem, multistage graphs, Floyd-Warshall
algorithm, N-Queens problem, and their performance analysis.
(7)
Parallel Random Access Machine Algorithms
Introduction, computation model, fundamental techniques and algorithms, selection, sorting, merging,
graph problems.
(6)
Advanced String Matching Algorithms
Naïve string matching algorithm, Robin-Karp algorithm, string matching with finite automata, Knuth-
Morris-Pratt algorithm.
(5)
P, NP and Approximation Algorithms
Basic Concepts, Non Deterministic algorithms, NP-Complete and NP-hard classes, introduction to
approximation, absolute approximations, polynomial time approximation schemes.
(5)
Text Book:
1.
Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest and Stein
:
Introduction to algorithms, Prentice-Hall of INDIA.
2. Horowitz, Sahni and Rajsekaran
:
Fundamentals of Computer Algorithms, Galgotia
Publications
References:
1. Aho, Hopcroft, Ullman
:
The Design and analysis of algorithms”, Pearson
Education.
NETWORK TECHNOLOGIES
Paper Code: CSE 8102
L T P : 4 0 0
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions, selecting at least two from each section.
Objectives: This course is designed to discuss recent developments in various fields of networking, including but not
limited to, routing, flow control, performance evaluation, transport protocols, application protocols, real-time
protocols, and network architectures.
SECTION – A
Introduction:
Overview of Computer Networks, seven-layer architecture, ISO-OSI and TCP/IP reference models
MAC protocols for high-speed LAN, MAN, WAN and wireless LAN: Gigabit Ethernet, Wireless LAN,
ISDN, DQDB, HIPPI, ATM, SMDS, SONET, ADSL
(11)
IPv6:
Basic protocol, extensions and options, support for QoS, security, neighbor discovery, auto-configuration,
routing. Application Programming Interface for IPv6.
(05)
Flow and Congestion Control:
Window and Rate Based Schemes, ABR, hop-by-hop schemes.
(02)
Quality of Service:
Quality of Service in ATM, IETF integrated services model, Differentiated Services Model. Flow
identification, Packet Classifiers and Filters. Scheduling.
(03)
Network Management:
ASN, SNMP, CMIP
(03)
SECTION – B
Mobility in networks:
Mobile IP and related issues like Route Optimization, Handoff, and Security. Mobility support for IPv6.
(03)
Transport Layer:
TCP extensions for high-speed networks, transaction-oriented applications. Other new options in TCP. TCP
in Wireless Domain
(04)
Network security at various layers:
Secure-HTTP, SSL, ESP, Authentication header, Key distribution protocols, Digital signatures, digital
certificates.
(05)
Traffic Management:
Economic Framework, Traffic Models, Traffic Classes, Scheduling, Admission Control, Peak Load Pricing
(04)
Ad Hoc Wireless Networks:
Issues: MAC, Routing, Transport Layer Protocols, Security, QoS
(05)
Text Books:
1. W. R. Stevens : TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1: The protocols, Addison
Wesley
2. W. Stallings : Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and
Practice, 2nd Edition, Pearson Education
3. Michael A. Gallo and William M. Hancock : Computer Communications and Networking Technologies,
Thomson Brooks / Cole
4. M. Gonsalves and K. Niles : IPv6 Networks, McGraw Hill
References:
1. C. E. Perkins, B. Woolf, and S. R. Alpert : Mobile IP: Design Principles and Practices, Addison
Wesley
2. S. Keshav : An Engineering Approach to Computer Networking,
Pearson Education
3. Requests for Comments (RFCs) & Internet Drafts, published by Internet Engineering Task Force (www.rfceditor.
org)
4. Proceedings of: ACM SIGCOMM Conference;
IEEE Infocom ;
5. Journals:
IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications
IEEE Transactions on Communication
ACM/IEEE Transactions on Networking
COMPUTER VISION & IMAGE PROCESSING
Paper Code: CSE 8103
L T P : 4 0 0
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions, at least two from each section.
Objectives: To introduce the different low level and high level computer vision techniques. Students are also made
aware about the different image processing techniques
SECTION – A
Introduction :
Vision goals, Geometric Camera models and calibrations, Radiometry, intensity, brightness, contrast, color
image representation, color models, Imaging Devices
(6)
Low Level Processing:
Intensity transform functions, histogram processing, Spatial filtering, Fourier transforms and its properties,
Walsh transform, Hotelling transforms, Haar and slant transforms, Hadamard transforms, frequency domain
filters, Homomorphic Filtering, Pseudo coloring, color transforms
(12)
Image Segmentation:
Point, Line and Edge Detection, Thresholding, Edge and Boundary linking, Hough transforms, Region Based
Segmentation, Contour following
(6)
SECTION – B
Image Representation & Descriptions:
Boundary representations, Region Representations, shape properties, Boundary Descriptors, Regional
Descriptors, Texture representations, Object Descriptions
(6)
Early Vision:
The Geometry of Multiple Views, Stereopsis, Affine Structure from Motion, Projective Structure from
Motion.
(6)
Mid Level Vision:
Segmentation By Clustering, Segmentation By Fitting a Model, Segmentation and Fitting Using Probabilistic
Methods,Tracking with Linear Dynamic Models.
(9)
Text Book:
1.
Gonzalez and Woods
:
Digital Image Processing ISDN 0-201-600- 781, Addison
Wesley 1992.
2. Forsyth and Ponce : Computer Vision A Modern Approach Pearson Education
Latest Edition
References:
1.
Trucco & Verri
:
Introductory Techniques for 3-D Computer Vision, Prentice
Hall, Latest Edition
2.
Low
:
Introductory Computer Vision and Image Processing,
McGraw-Hill 1991, ISBN 0-07-707403-3
3.
Jain, Kasturi and Schunk
:
Machine Vision, McGraw-HiII. 1995 ISBN 0070320187.
4. Sonka, Hlavac, Boyle
:
Image -Processing, Analysis and Machine Vision 2nd ed. ISBN
0-534-95393-X, PWS Publishing,1999
ADVANCED COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE
Paper Code: CSE-8104
L T P : 4 0 0
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions by selecting at least two from each section.
Objectives: This course offers a good understanding of various functional units of a computer system and prepares the
students to be in a position to design a basic computer system.
SECTION – A
Introduction to Parallel Computer Models:
The State of Computing, Multiprocessors and Multicomputers, A Taxonomy of MIMD Computers, Multivector
and SIMD Computers, Vector Supercomputers, SIMD Supercomputers, Parallel Random Access
Machines, VLSI Complexity Model, Architectural Development Tracks: Multiple – Processor Tracks,
Multi-vector and SIMD Tracks, Multithreaded and Dataflow Tracks.
(04 hrs)
Program and Networks Properties:
Conditions of Parallelism, Data and Resource Dependences, Hardware and Software Parallelism, The
Role of Compilers, Program Partitioning and Scheduling: Grain Sizes and Latency, Grain Packing and
Scheduling, Static Multiprocessor Scheduling, Program Flow Mechanisms: Control Flow Vs Data Flow,
Demand-Driven Mechanism, Comparison of Flow Mechanisms, System Interconnect Architectures:
Network Properties and Routing, Static Connection Networks, Dynamic Connection Networks.
(06 hrs)
Principles of Scalable Performance:
Performance Metrics and Measures: Parallelism Profile in Programs, Harmonic Mean Performance,
Efficiency, Utilization and Quality, Standard Performance Measures, Speedup Performance Laws:
Amdahl’s Law for a Fixed Workload, Gustafron’s Law for Sealed Problems, Scalability Analysis and
Approaches: Scalability Metrics and Goals, Evolution of Scalable Computers.
(06 hrs)
Processors and Memory Hierarchy:
Advance Processor Technology: Instruction Set Architecture, CISC and RISC Scalar Processors,
Superscalar and Vector Processors: Superscalar Processors, The VLIW Architecture, Vector and
Symbolic Processors, Memory Hierarchy Technology: Hierarchical Memory Technology, Inclusion,
Coherence and Locality, Memory Capacity Planning.
(06 hrs)
SECTION – B
Multiprocessors and Multicomputers:
Multiprocessor System Interconnects: Hierarchical Bus system, Crossbar Switch and Multiport Memory,
Multistage and Combining Networks, Cache Coherence and Synchronization Mechanisms: The Cache
Coherence Problem, Snoopy Bus Protocol, Hardware Synchronization Mechanisms.
(06 hrs)
Multivector and SIMD Computers:
Vector Processing Principles: Vector Instruction Types, Vector Access Memory Schemes, Multivector
Multiprocessors: Performance- Directed Design rules, Cray Y – MP, C-90 and MPP, SIMD Computer
Organization: Implementation Models, The CM-2 architecture.
(05 hrs)
Software for Parallel programming:
Shared-variable Model, Message-passing Model, Data-parallel Model, Object-Oriented Model, Functional
and Logic Models, Parallel Languages and Compilers: Language Features for Parallelism, Parallel
Language Constructs, Optimizing Compilers for Parallelism.
(06 hrs)
Parallel Programming Environment:
Software Tools and Environment, Y-MP, Paragon and CM-5 Environment, Visualization and
Performance Tuning, Synchronization and Multiprocessing Modes: Principles of Synchronization,
Multiprocessor Execution Modes, Shared-Variable Program Structures, Locks for Protected Access,
Semaphores and Applications, Monitors and Applications, Message-passing Program Development,
Distributing the Computation, Synchronous Message Passing, Asynchronous Message Passing, Mapping
Programs on to Multicomputers: Domain Decomposition Techniques, Control Decomposition
Techniques, Heterogeneous Processing.
(06 hrs)
Text Book:
1. Kai Hwang : Advanced Computer Architecture: Parallelism, Scalability,
Programmability, Tata McGraw-Hill
References:
1. Michael J. Quinn : Parallel Computing – Theory and Practice, 2nd Edition,
McGraw Hill,
2. S.G. Akl : Design and Analysis of Parallel Algorithms, Prentice Hall,
3. S. Lakshmivarahan and S.K. Dhall : Analysis and Design of Parallel Algorithms - Arithmetic and
Matrix Problems, McGraw Hill International Edition,
4. S.K. Ghosal : A Practical Approach to Parallel Computing, Universities
Press (India) Limited
DATABASE TECHNOLOGIES
Paper Code: CSE 8105
L T P : 4 0 0
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner will set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidates will be required to
attempt five questions, selecting at least two from each section.
Objectives: This course offers a good understanding of emerging database technologies and prepares students to be in
a position to design databases in variety of technologies like xml, object oriented etc.
SECTION – A
Introduction:
Database System Concepts and Architecture, Data Independence, Data Models, SQL: DDL, DML, DCL,
Database Integrity, Normalization: 1NF, 2NF, 3NF, BCNF, 4NF, 5NF.
(06)
Advanced Transaction Processing and Concurrency Control:
Transaction Concepts, Concurrency Control: Locking Methods, Timestamping Methods, Optimistic
Methods for Concurrency Control, Concurrency Control in Distributed Systems.
(06)
Object Oriented and Object Relational Databases:
Object Oriented Concepts with respect to Database Systems, Object Oriented Data Model, OODB,
OODBMS, ODMG, ODL, OQL, ORDBMS, ORDBMS Design, ORDBMS Query Language.
(05)
Parallel and Distributed Databases:
Parallel Databases, Distributed Databases, Differences between them, Architecture of Distributed Databases,
Architecture of Parallel Databases, Key elements of Parallel Database Processing, Fragmentation,
Replication and Allocation for distributed databases, Intra-query parallelism, Inter-query parallelism, Intraoperation
parallelism, Inter-operation parallelism.
(06)
SECTION – B
Backup and Recovery Techniques:
Backup and Recovery Concepts, Types of Database Failures, Types of Database Recovery, Recovery
Techniques: Deferred Update, Immediate Update, Shadow Paging, Checkpoints, Buffer Management,
Recovery Control in Distributed Systems.
(05)
XML and Internet Databases:
Structured, Semi Structured, and Unstructured Data, XML Hierarchical Data Model, XML Documents,
DTD, XML Schema, XML Querying: XPath, XQuery.
04)
Emerging Database Technologies:
Introduction to Deductive Database Systems, Temporal Databases, Multimedia Databases, Mobile
Databases, Main Memory Databases, Spatial and Multidimensional Databases.
(08)
Data Warehousing and Mining:
Introduction to OLAP, OLTP and differences between them, Data Warehouse, Data Warehouse
Architecture, Data Marts, Data Mining, Data Mining Process, Knowledge Discovery.
(05)
Text Book:
1.
Ramez Elmasri, Shamkant Navathe
:
Fundamentals of Database Systems, Fifth Edition,
Pearson Education, 2007.
References:
1. C.J. Date : An Introduction to Database Systems, Eighth Edition,
Pearson Education.
2. Alexis Leon, Mathews Leon : Database Management Systems, Leon Press.
3. S. K. Singh : Database Systems Concepts, Design and Applications,
Pearson Education.
4. Raghu Ramakrishnan, Johannes Gehrke : Database Management Systems, Tata McGraw-Hill.
5. Abraham Silberschatz, Henry F. Korth, S.
Sudarshan
: Database System Concepts, Tata McGraw-Hill.
SOFTWARE LAB-I
Paper Code: CSE 8106
L T P : 0 0 6
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 100
Note: Students are required to perform at least 10 experiments/ case studies / programming assignments belonging to
the semester theory subjects selecting at least two from each subject.
Paper Title: Data Warehousing & Data Mining
Paper Code: CSE 8201
L T P: 4 0 0
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions, at least two from each section.
Objectives: This Course introduces the Data Warehouses and Data Mining Concepts to students. Advance
implementation techniques and their applications are covered in this course.
SECTION – A
Introduction:
Introduction to RDBMS, Data Warehouse, Transactional Databases, Data Mining Functionalities,
Interestingness of pattern, classification of data mining system, major issues
(4)
Data Warehouse and OLAP:
Difference from traditional databases, Multidimensional data model, Schema for Multi dimensional model,
measures, concept hierarchies, OLAP operations, starnet query model, Data Warehouse architecture,
ROLAP, MOLAP, HOLAP, Data Warehouse Implementation, Data Cube, Metadata Repositories, OLAM
(8)
Data Processing:
Data Cleaning, Data Integration and Transformation, Data Reduction, Discretization and concept hierarchy
generation
(6)
Data Mining Architecture:
Data Mining primitives, Task relevant data, interestingness measures, presentation and visualization of
patterns, Data Mining Architecture, Concept Description, Data Generalization and Summarization,
Attributed oriented induction, Analytical characterization, Mining class comparisons
(7)
SECTION – B
Association Rules:
Association rules mining, Mining Association rules from single level, multilevel transaction databases, multi
dimensional relational databases and data warehouses, Correlational analysis, Constraint based association
mining
(6)
Classification and Clustering :
Classification and prediction, Decision tree induction, Bayesian classification, k-nearest neighbor
classification, Cluster analysis, Types of data in clustering, categorization of clustering methods
(6)
Introduction of Mining Complex Data:
Complex data objects, Mining spatial databases, Multimedia databases, Time Series and sequence databases,
Text databases and World Wide Web
(8)
Text Book:
1.
J.Han and M. Kamber
:
Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques By Morgan
Kaufman publishers, Harcourt India pvt. Ltd. Latest
Edition
References:
1.
Dunham
:
Data Mining Introductory and Advance Topics, Pearson
Education, Latest Edition
2.
Berson
:
Data Mining By TMH
Paper Title: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Paper Code: CSE8202 Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions, selecting at least two from each section.
SECTION – A
Introduction to Educational Research
Concept, types-basic, applied and action, Need for educational research
(06)
Reviewing Literature
Need, Sources-Primary and Secondary, Purposes of Review, Scope of Review, Steps in conducting review
(06)
Identifying and defining research problem
Locating. Analyzing stating and evaluating problem, Generating different types of hypotheses and evaluating
them.
(08)
Method of Research
Descriptive research design-survey, case study, content analysis, Ex-post Facto Research, Correlational and
Experimental Research
(20)
Sampling Techniques
Concept of population and sample’ sampling techniques-simple random sampling, stratified random sampling,
systematic sampling and cluster sampling, snow ball sampling, purposive sampling, quota sampling
techniques determining size of sample
(10)
SECTION – B
Design and development of measuring instruments, Tests, questionnaires, checklists, observation
schedules, evaluating research instruments, selecting a standardized test.
(12)
Procedure of data collection
Aspects of data collection, coding data for analysis
(06)
Statistical Methods of Analysis
Descriptive statistics: Meaning, graphical representations, mean, range and standard deviation, characteristics
and uses of normal curve.
Inferential statistics: t-test. Chi-square tests. Correlation (rank difference and product moment), ANOVA (one
way)
(14)
Procedure for writing a research proposal
Purpose, types and components of research proposal
(4)
Procedure for writing a research report
Audiences and types of research reports, Format of Research report and journal
(4)
Strategies for evaluating, research, disseminating and utilizing research- An Overview
1. Borg, W and Gall, M. Educational Research: An Introduction, New York, Longman, 2003
2. Cohen, L. Educational Research in class rooms and schools! A Manual of Materials and Methods NY:
Harper and Row Publishers,2000
3. CPSC: Developing Skills in Technican Education Research Modules 1 to 11 Singapore, Colombo Plan
Staff College for Technician Education
4. Garrett, HE and Woodworth, RS Statistics in Psychology and
Education, Educational Research, Bombay: Vakils Fetter and Simons Ltd. 2003
5. Gay, LR, Educational Research, Ohio: Charles E. Merril Publishing Company 2000
6. Wiersma William Research Methods in Education- An Introduction London, Allyn and Bacon, Inc. 2000
SOFTWARE TESTING AND QUALITY MANAGEMENT
Paper Code: CSE 8203
L T P: 4 0 0
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner will set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidates will be required to
attempt five questions, selecting at least two from each section.
Objectives: This course offers a good understanding of methods and techniques of software testing and quality
management concepts and prepares students to be in a position to develop error free and quality software.
SECTION – A
Introduction:
Software Engineering, Software Process Models, Management Process, Scheduling, Estimation, Software
Metrics.
(05)
Software Quality:
Quality Concepts, Quality Control, Quality Assurance, Cost of Quality, SQA Activities, Total Quality
Management Principles, Software Reviews, Formal Technical Reviews, Software Reliability, Software Safety,
ISO Approaches to Quality Assurance Systems.
(05)
Standards, Practices, Conventions and Metrics:
Quality Assurance Standards, ISO 9000, ISO 9001:2000, ISO 9126 Quality Factors, CMM, Six Sigma,
Software Quality Assurance Metrics, Advantages, QA Techniques, Introduction to SPICE.
(06)
Risk and Software Configuration Management:
Software Risks, The RMMM Plan, Software Configuration Management Process: Version Control, Change
Control.
(05)
SECTION – B
Software Testing:
Testing, Test Strategies for Conventional and Object Oriented Software, Unit and Integration Testing,
Validation Testing, System Testing, Metrics for Source Code, Metrics for Testing, Debugging.
(05)
Testing Techniques for Conventional and Object Oriented Software:
Black Box and White Box Testing, Basis Path Testing, Control Structure Testing, Object Oriented Testing
Methods: Applicability of Conventional Test Case Design Methods, Testing Methods Applicable at the Class
Level.
(06)
Testing Process:
Test Plan development, Requirement Phase Testing, Design Phase Testing, Program Phase Testing, Execute
Test and Record Results.
(06)
Testing Specialized Systems and Applications:
Testing Client/Server Systems, Testing Web based Systems, Testing in Multiplatform Environment, Testing
Off-the-Shelf Software, Testing for Real Time Systems, Testing Security.
(07)
Text Books:
1.
Ian Sommerville
:
Software Engineering, Seventh Edition, Pearson Education.
2.
William E. Perry
:
Effective Methods for Software Testing, Second Edition, John
Wiley & Sons.
3.
R.S. Pressman
:
Software Engineering: A Practitioner's Approach, Sixth
Edition, Tata McGraw-Hill.
References:
1.
Boris Beizer
:
Software Testing Techniques, Second Edition, Dreamtech.
2.
Nina S Godbole
:
Software Quality Assurance – Principles and Practice, Narosa.
3.
S.L. Pfleeger, J.M. Atlee
:
Software Engineering: Theory and Practice, Second Edition,
Pearson Education.
4.
K.K. Aggarwal, Yogesh Singh
:
Software Engineering, Second Edition, New Age International.
5.
Pankaj Jalote
:
An Integrated Approach to Software Engineering, Second
Edition, Narosa.
SOFTWARE LAB-II
Paper Code: CSE 8204
L T P : 0 0 6
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 100
Note: Students are required to perform at least 10 experiments/ case studies / programming assignments belonging to
the semester theory subjects selecting at least two from each subject.
PARALLEL AND DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING
Paper Code : CSE 8205
L T P : 4 0 0
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions atleast two questions from each section.
Objectives: Students will learn about programming paradigms used in parallel computation, about the organization of
parallel systems, and about the application of programs and systems to solve interesting problems.
SECTION – A
Fundamental Issues
Basic issues and model Asynchrony, delay, failure concurrency, Communication topology, load
balancing, scaling
(8 hrs)
Basic Approaches
Agreement and consensus problems, transactions, Algorithms for reduction, scans (also non-parallel
issues). Analysis: work/time complexity.
(12 hrs)
SECTION – B
Shared Memory
Models and primitives, PRAM, VRAM, semaphores, spin-locks, Barriers’ implementations, NESL,
Threads, distributed shared memory
(10 hrs)
Parallel Architectures
Survey of Architectures KSR, TMC, MasPar, workstation clusters
(3 hrs)
Algorithm Development and Analysis
Parallel algorithms, Connected components (dense and sparse case), Sorting, distributed algorithms,
Clock synchronization
(12 hrs)
Text Book:
1.
Kai, Hwang
:
Computer Architecture and parallel processing, Tata McGraw
Hill Co.
References:
1.
F.T.Leighton
:
Introduction to Parallel Algorithms and Architectures:
Arrays, Trees, Hypercubes, Morgan Kaufinann Publishers,
San Mateo, California
2.
Joseph Ja Ja
:
An Introduction to Parallel algorithms, Addison Wesley.
3
Patterson
:
Computer Architecture-Quantitative Analysis
NETWORK SECURITY
Paper Code: CSE 8206
L T P : 4 0 0
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions, at least two from each section.
Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants will have gained knowledge of information security concepts
and the following: Understanding of Information Security (InfoSec) principles and approaches
• Understanding of the basic components of InfoSec
• Understanding of basic InfoSec applications
• Ability to remain current with InfoSec literature
• Ability to progress to independent work in the field
SECTION – A
Introduction: Network and computer security issues. Security attacks, Security Services, and
Security Mechanisms. Network security models. Basic concept of symmetric and asymmetric
cryptography.
( 3 hrs)
Symmetric Key Cryptography:
Substitution and Transposition techniques. Block cipher principles. Data Encryption Standard
(DES), Triple DES. Block cipher modes of operation. Stream cipher structure and RC4
algorithm. Confidentiality using symmetric key encryption. Symmetric key distribution.
(10 hrs)
Asymmetric Key Cryptography:
Prime numbers overview. Fermat’s and Euler’s theorems. Principles of public key cryptosystems.
RSA algorithm. Distribution of public keys. Diffie-Hellman key exchange.
(8 hrs)
Message Authentication:
Authentication requirements and functions. Message Authentication Code. Hash functions. Hash and
MAC algorithms: MD5, Secure Hash Algorithm (SHA) and HMAC.
(4 hrs)
SECTION – B
Digital Signatures and Authentication:
Digital Signatures. Authentication protocols. Digital Signature Standard. Authentication
Applications: Kerberos.
(4 hrs)
Email Security:
Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) operation. S/MIME specifications and functionality.
(3 hrs)
IP Security :
Architecture, Authentication Header, Encapsulating, Security, Payload, Security associations, Key
Management.
(5 hrs)
Web Security:
Secure Socket Layer. Transport Layer Security. Secure Electronic Transaction
(3 hrs)
Firewalls :
Design Principles, Characteristics, types of firewalls, firewall configuration, trusted system.'
(3 hrs)
Intrusion Defense Mechanisms: Intrusion Detection techniques. (2 hrs)
Text Book:
1 Stallings, Willam
:
Cryptography and Network Security-Principles and Practices,
4th edition. Pearson Education, PHI.
2 Kahate, Atul : Cryptography and Network Security, 2nd Edition, TMH
3 Tanenbaum, A.S. : Computer Networks, 4th Edition, Pearson Education
4 Forouzan, B.A. : Cryptography and Network Security, McGraw-Hill.
MODELING AND SIMULATION
Paper Code: : CSE 8207
L T P : 4 0 0
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions, at least two from each section.
Objectives: This course should provide the students with good understanding of various techniques of Simulation.
At the end of this course students will be having good knowledge of simulation concepts and simulation languages.
SECTION – A
Introduction:
What is modeling and simulation. application areas, definition and types of system, model and
simulation, introduction to discrete-event and continuous simulation.
Simulation Methods:
Discrete-event Simulation, Time advance Mechanisms, Components and organization of Discreteevent
simulation, Flowchart of next-event time advance approach, Continuous Simulation, Random
Number generation methods.
Queuing Models:
Single server queuing system, introduction to arrival and departure time, flowcharts for arrival and
departure routine. Event graphs of queuing model. Determining the events and variables.
(2 hrs)
(10 hrs)
(8 hrs)
SECTION – B
Distribution Functions :
Stochastic activities, Discrete probability functions, Cumulative distribution function, Continuous
probability functions. Generation of random numbers following binomial distribution, poisson
distribution, continuous distribution, normal distribution, exponential distribution, uniform
distribution.
Programming in MATLAB:
Introduction, Branching statements, loops, functions, additional data types, plots, arrays,
inputs/outputs etc.
Programming in GPSS and C/C++:
Basic Introduction to Special Simulation Languages:-GPSS and Implementation of Queuing Models
using C/C++.
Introduction to Simulators: Introduction regarding features and usage of any Network simulator.
(10 hrs)
(7 hrs)
(6 hrs)
(2 hrs)
Text Books:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Averill M. Law and W. David Kelton
Geoffery Gordon
D.S. Hira
Stephen J. Chapman
:
:
:
:
“Simulation Modeling and Analysis”, Tata McGraw-Hill
Publication.
“System Simulation”, Prentice-Hall of India.
“System Simulation”, S. Chand Publication.
“MATLAB Programming for Engineers”, Thomson
learning inc.
References:
1.
2.
Jerry Banks, John S. Carson, Barry L. Nelson
and David M. Nicol
Rudra Pratap
:
:
“Discrete-Event System Simulation”, Prentice-Hall of
India.
“Getting Started with MATLAB 7”, Oxford University
Press.
OPEN SOURCE SOFTWARE
Paper Code: CSE 8208
L T P : 3 0 3
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions, selecting at least two from each section.
Objectives: This course should provide the students with a fairly good knowledge and understanding of Open Source
Software. After completion of this subject students should be able to use copyright free Open Source Software (OSS)
products in research and collaborate in enhancement of these OSS products.
SECTION – A
Introduction:
Open Source origins, Differences among Open Source, freeware, proprietary and other software.
Principle & Techniques of Open Source Development, Issues in Open Source Software Development
(05)
Legal issues:
Copyright and IPR, Open Source Licenses, Open Standards
(04)
Open Source Operating Systems: Linux's History and flavors, Installation of Linux: File system of
linux, Network & packages Configuration, LILO, GRUB, Linux's fdisk. Overview of Linux structure,
general purpose Linux commands; working with editor. Introduction to Open Office, Introduction to
c/c++ programming in linux environment, shell programming
(12)
SECTION – B
Internet - The technology:
Open standards. W3C Protocols. Role of XML in Open Source Software Development
(04)
Open Source Database:
Introduction to MySQL, Database design and development using MySQL
(07)
Open Source Web Development Tools:
PHP syntax (variables, control structures, functions), File Handling: Uploading files. Using PHP to
open, read, write and close external files and manipulate data. Security: Avoiding security pitfalls by
careful coding.
(10)
Case Studies related to successful implementation of open source software. (03)
Text Book:
1. Elizabeth Naramore, Jason Gerner, Yann Le
Scouarnec, Jeremy Stolz, Michael K. Glass
: Beginning PHP5, Apache, MySQL Web Development,
Wiley Publishing Inc.
2. Graham Glass, King Ablas : Unix for Programmers and Users, Pearson Education
References:
1. www.opensource.org :
2. www.w3.org :
MULTIMEDIA SYSTEM DESIGN
Paper Code: CSE 8209
L T P: 3 0 3
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions, at least two from each section.
Objectives: This Course introduces the multimedia systems and their applications to students. This course covers the
different compression standards used in multimedia, some current technology and related issues.
SECTION – A
Introduction:
Multimedia and its types, Introduction to Hypermedia, Hyper Text, Multimedia Systems and their
Characteristics, Challenges, Desirable Features, Components and Applications, Trends in Multimedia
(4)
Multimedia Technology:
Multimedia Systems Technology , Multimedia Hardware devices, Multimedia software development
tools, Multimedia Authoring Tools, Multimedia Standards for Document Architecture, SGML, ODA,
Multimedia Standards for Document interchange, MHEG, Multimedia Software for different media.
(6)
Storage Media :
Magnetic and Optical Media, RAID and its levels, Compact Disc and its standards, DVD and its
standards, Multimedia Servers
(4)
Image,Graphics and Video:
Graphic/Image File Formats, Graphic/Image Data, Colour in Image and Video, Colour Image and
Video Representations, Basics of Video ,Types of Colour Video Signals, Analog Video, Digital
Video, TV standards
(6)
SECTION – B
Video and Audio Compression :
Classifying Compression Algorithms, Lossless Compression Algorithms, Entropy Encoding, Runlength
Encoding, Pattern Substitution, Basics of Information theory, Huffman Coding, Huffman
Coding of Images, Adaptive Huffman Coding, Arithmetic Coding, Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW)
Algorithm, Source Coding Techniques , Transform Coding, Frequency Domain Methods, Differential
Encoding, Vector Quantisation, JPEG Compression, Video Compression, H. 261 Compression, Intra
Frame Coding, Inter-frame (P-frame) Coding, MPEG Compression, MPEG Video, The MPEG Video
Bitstream , Decoding MPEG Video in Software , Audio Compression, Simple Audio Compression
Methods, Psychoacoustics ,MPEG Audio Compression
(12)
Multimedia Communication:
Building Communication network, Application Subsystem, Transport Subsystem, QOS, Resource
Management, Distributed Multimedia Systems
(6)
System Design issues:
Design considerations, Design steps, Feasibility analysis and Performance Evaluations, Different
ways to analyze performance, Multimedia System architecture and different components
(6)
Text Book:
1.
Ralf Steinmetz and Klara Nahrstedt
:
Multimedia Computing Communications and
Applications By Pearson Educations
References:
1.
Prabhat K. Andleigh, Kran Thakkar
:
Multimedia System Design, PHI, Latest Edition
2.
Li, Drew
:
Multimedia Computing, Pearson Education, Latest
Edition
3.
Fred Halsall Multimedia Communications, Pearson Education, Latest
Edition
SOFT COMPUTING
Paper Code: CSE 8210
L T P : 3 0 3
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions, at least two from each section.
Objectives: To get basic knowledge of different soft computing techniques. Different problem solving techniques and
their implementations and applications are explained. Intelligent systems and learning techniques are introduced.
SECTION – A
Intelligent Agents:
Agents Behavior and Environments, Structure of Agents, Planning Problem, Planning with
state Space Search, Partial order Planning, GRAPHPLAN, Planning in logic, Planning in
non-deterministic domains, hierarchical task planning, Multi agent planning, execution.
(9)
Probabilistic Reasoning Fuzzy Logic:
Knowledge representation under uncertainty, Bayesian theorem, Bayesian Networks,
Dempster Shafer theory, Representing vagueness, Fuzzy sets, operation on fuzzy sets,
reasoning with fuzzy logic, Fuzzy Automata, Fuzzy Control methods, Fuzzy decision
making, inference in temporal models, Hidden Markov Models, Kalman Filters
(12)
SECTION – B
Neural Networks:
Basic concepts, Single layer perception, Multilayer Perception, Supervised and
Unsupervised learning - Backpropagation networks - Kohnen's self organizing networks -
Hopfield network.
Introduction to Artificial Neural Systems - Perceptron - Representation - Linear
separability - Learning – Training algorithm -Adaptive networks based Fuzzy interface
systems - Classification and Regression Trees - Data clustering algorithms - Rule based
structure identification - Neuro-Fuzzy controls - Simulated annealing
(16)
Genetic Algorithms:
Evolutionary computation. Survival of the Fittest - Fitness Computations - Cross over –
Mutation, Reproduction - Rank method - Rank space method.
(8)
Text Book:
1.
Stuart J.Russel, Norvig
:
AI: A Modern Approach, Pearson Education, Latest Edition
2. Michael Negnevitsky : Artificial Intelligence: A Guide to Intelligent Systems, 2/E,
Addison-Wesley, 2005
References:
1.
James Freeman A. and David Skapura M
:
Neural Networks - Algorithms, Applications & Programming
Techniques Addison Wesley,1992.
2.
Yegnanarayana B
:
Artificial Neural Networks, Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd.,
New Delhi, 1999.
3.
Hagan, M.T., Demuth, Mark Beale : Neural Network Design By Cengage Learning
4. Goldberg, David E. : Genetic algorithms in search, optimization and machine
learning, Latest Edition, Addison Wesley
NATURAL LANGUAGE PROCESSING
Paper Code: CSE 8301
LTP : 3 0 3
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions, at least two from each section.
Objectives: This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts and ideas in natural language
processing (NLP), and to get them up to speed with current research in the area.
SECTION – A
Introduction to NLP: Introduction and Survey of applications, Levels of linguistic processing:
morphology, syntax, semantics
Language processors and Understanding: recognizers, transducers, parsers, generators,
Language as a rule-based system, Language understanding as an inferential activity.
Resources for NLP: Introduction to lexicons and knowledge bases.
Computational morphology: lemmatization, Part-of-Speech Tagging, Finite-State Analysis.
(4 hrs)
(10 Hrs)
(2hrs)
(5 Hrs)
SECTION – B
Syntactic Processing: Basic parsing: Top Down and Bottom Up parsing, Chart parsing,
Deterministic parsing, Statistical parsing, Grammars with features, Unification Grammars, The
Lexicon.
Semantic Interpretation: Lexical semantics, Semantics and logical form, Resolving ambiguities:
Word Sense Disambiguation, Linking syntax and semantics, Linking syntax and semantics in
restricted domains
Context and World Knowledge: Discourse: linguistic context, Ellipsis; World knowledge,
Discourse structure Conversation and co-operation, Implementing "co-operative responses",
Information Retrieval and Information Extraction
(8 hrs)
(8 hrs)
(8 hrs)
Text Book:
1. Allen, J.
:
Natural language understanding, 2nd Edition, Redwood
City, CA: 1994. Benjamin/Cummings.
References:
1.
Covington, M.A
:
Natural Language Processing for Prolog . Programmers,
(1994), Prentice Hall
2.
Jurafsky, D. and Martin
:
Speech and Language Processing, (2000), Prentice
Hall
3 Gazdar, G. & Mellish, C. : Natural Language Processing in Prolog: An Introduction
to Computational Linguistics,(1989), Addison Wesley
GRID COMPUTING
Paper Code: CSE 8302
L T P: 3 0 3
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner will set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidates will be required to
attempt five questions, selecting at least two from each section.
Objectives: This course offers a good understanding of grid computing concepts and prepares students to be in a
position to design grid based applications for distributed systems.
SECTION – A
Introduction:
Grid Computing, Benefits of Grid Computing, Virtual Organizations, Grid Architecture and its
relationship to other distributed technologies, Grid Application Areas, OGSA, OGSI, Introduction to
Semantic Grids.
(06)
Building Blocks for Grid Systems:
XML, SOAP, UDDI, Service Oriented Architecture, Web Services, Web Services Architecture,
WSRF, Relationship between Grid and Web Services, Grid and Web Services Invocation.
(06)
Data Management:
Overview of Data Management in GT4, Data Movement: GridFTP, RFT, Data Replication: RLS,
Higher level data services.
(05)
Resource Management and Scheduling:
Resource Management Concepts, Generalized Resource Management Framework, Grid Resource
Management Systems, Scheduling in Grids, QoS, Introduction to GRAM.
(06)
SECTION – B
Security:
Security Issues in Grids, Authentication Issues, Trust and Privacy related Issues, Authorization
Issues, Grid Security Frameworks, Standards, Web Services Security Specifications.
(08)
Monitoring and Discovery Services:
Index Services, Resource Discovery, UDDI, Introduction to MDS in GT4.
(04)
Grid Middleware and Programming Model:
Study of Globus Toolkit 4 Components and its Programming Model, Singleton and Multiple
Resources, Logging, Lifecycle Management, Notifications, Study of important distributed systems
like Legion, CRISIS.
(10)
Text Book:
1.
Joshy Joseph, Craig Fellenstein
:
Grid Computing, First Edition, Pearson Education, 2004.
References:
1.
Ian Foster, Carl Kesselman
:
The Grid 2: Blueprint for a New Computing
Infrastructure, Second Edition, Morgan Kaufman, 2003.
2.
Bart Jacob, Michael Brown, Kentaro Fukul,
Nihar Trivedi
:
Introduction to Grid Computing, First Edition, IBM Red
Books, 2005.
3.
Zarek Nabrzyski, Jennifer M. Schopf, Jan
Weglarz
:
Grid Resource Management - State of the Art and Future
Trends, Kluwer Academic Publishers.
4.
Anirban Chakrabarti
:
Grid Computing Security, Springer, 2007.
5.
Borja Sotomayor, Lisa Childers
:
Globus Toolkit 4: Programming Java Services, First
Edition, Morgan Kaufman, 2005.
MACHINE VISION
Paper Code: CSE 8303
L T P : 4 0 0
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions, at least two from each section.
Objectives: To introduce the different low level and high level computer vision techniques. Students are also made
aware about the different pattern recognition approaches.
SECTION – A
Introduction:
Camera Models, & Views, basics of image processing, introductions to image segmentation and
representation.
(6)
Early Vision :
Vision goals, Linear Filters , Edge Detection, Texture, The Geometry of Multiple Views, Stereopsis,
Affine Structure from Motion, Projective Structure from Motion,
(8)
Mid Level Vision:
Segmentation By Clustering, Segmentation By Fitting a Model, Segmentation and Fitting Using
Probabilistic Methods,Tracking with Linear Dynamic Models.
(8)
SECTION – B
High-level Vision: Geometric Methods
Model-Based Vision, Smooth Surfaces and their Outlines, Aspect Graphs, Range Data
(7)
High-level Vision: Probabilistic and Inferential Methods:
Finding Templates using Classifiers, Recognition by Relations between Templates, Geometric
Templates from Spatial Relations
(8)
Applications:
Digital Libraries, Image Rendering, Medical applications, Human activity recognition, Face
Recognition
(8)
Text Book:
1. Forsyth and Ponce : Computer Vision A Modern Approach Pearson
Education Latest Edition
References:
1.
Trucco & Verri
:
Introductory Techniques for 3-D Computer Vision,
Prentice Hall, Latest Edition
2.
Low
:
Introductory Computer Vision and Image Processing,
McGraw-Hill 1991, ISBN 0-07-707403-3
3.
Jain, Kasturi and Schunk
:
Machine Vision, McGraw-HiII. 1995 ISBN
0070320187.
4. Sonka, Hlavac, Boyle
:
Image -Processing, Analysis and Machine Vision 2nd
ed. ISBN 0-534-95393-X, PWS Publishing,1999
Information Retrieval
CSE 8304
L T P: 3 0 3
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: - Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions, at least two from each section.
Objectives: This subject will provide the knowledge of various concepts involved in efficient information retrieval
that leads to the development of efficient Web crawling techniques.
SECTION – A
Introduction
Introduction to Information Retrieval. Inverted indices and boolean queries. Query optimization. The
nature of unstructured and semi-structured text.
5
The term vocabulary and postings lists
Text encoding: tokenization, stemming, lemmatization, stop words, phrases. Optimizing indices with
skip lists. Proximity and phrase queries. Positional indices.
5
Dictionaries and tolerant retrieval
Dictionary data structures. Wild-card queries, permuterm indices, n-gram indices. Spelling correction
and synonyms: edit distance, soundex, language detection.
6
Index construction
Postings size estimation, sort-based indexing, dynamic indexing, positional indexes, n-gram indexes,
distributed indexing, real-world issues.
5
SECTION – B
Scoring
Term weighting and the vector space model. Parametric or fielded search. Document zones. The
vector space retrieval model. tf.idf weighting. The cosine measure. Scoring documents.
6
Computing scores in a complete search system
Components of an IR system. Efficient vector space scoring. Nearest neighbor techniques, reduced
dimensionality approximations, random projection.
6
Classification
Naive Bayes models. Spam filtering, K Nearest Neighbors, Decision Trees, Support vector machine
classifiers.
6
Web Crawling
What makes the web different? Web search overview, web structure, the user, paid placement, search
engine optimization. Web size measurement, Crawling and web indexes. Near-duplicate detection,
Link analysis, Learning to rank, focused web crawler and its different architectures.
6
Text Book:
1. C. Manning, P. Raghavan, and H. Schütze
:
Introduction to Information Retrieval, Cambridge
University Press,2008
2. R. Baeza-Yates, B. Ribeiro-Neto Modern Information Retrieval, Addison-Wesley, 1999
WIRELESS NETWOKS
Paper Code: CSE 8305
L T P : 4 0 0
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions, at least two from each section.
Objectives: This challenging and comprehensive course provides a broad perspective on the wireless networks.
SECTION – A
Overview of wireless networks:
Introduction to wireless communication, architecture of wireless networks – 802.11, 2G, 3G, WLL,
Wireless ATM, 802.16 and 802.20.
6
5
4
5
Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM):
Evolution, mobile service, system architecture, radio interface, protocols, handover and security.
Introduction to GPRS, EDGE and CDMA2000 technologies and architectures.
WiMAX Networks:
Uses, architecture, MAC layer, physical layer, spectrum allocation issues, comparison with WiFi and
limitations.
SECTION – B
Mobile Ad hoc Networks (MANETs):
Introduction to Ad hoc wireless networks and sensor networks, applications of Ad hoc networks,
Power management.
4
4
4
4
5
4
Media Access Control Protocols in Ad-hoc:
Issues in designing MAC protocols, deign goals and classifications of MAC protocols.
Transport layer issues in Ad-hoc networks:
Design goals of transport layer protocols, classification of transport layer solutions and TCP over
Ad hoc wireless networks.
QoS and Security issues in MANETs:
Network security requirements, issues and challenges in security and QoS provisioning,
classifications of QoS solutions.
Routing Protocols:
Issues in designing protocols, classifications of routing protocols, operation of multicast routing
protocols.
Introduction to simulators:
NS2 and Qualnet.
Text Book:
1.
2.
William Stallings
C. Siva Ram Murthy and B. S Manoj
:
Wireless Communication and Networks, Prentice Hall.
Adhoc Wireless Networks – Architecture and Protocols,
Prentice Hall.
References:
1.
C. Demorais and D. P Aggarwal
:
Adhoc Networks – Theory and Applications, World
Scientific Publications
2.
Jochen Schiller
:
Mobile Communication, Pearson Education.
PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Paper Code: CSE 8306
L T P : 4 0 0
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: There are two sections in the syllabus. Paper setter will have to set 8 questions from them. Students must
attempt 5 questions such that at least 2 from each section.
Objectives: The objective of the subject is to provide a strategic perspective and demonstrating means to manage
projects. Emphasizing on various project aspects and problems related to them.
SECTION – A
Introduction to project management:
Introduction, Importance of software project management, Project and different types of project,
What is management?, Problems with software projects, Environmental Appraisal with Projects,
Requirement Specification, Management Control, Steps in project planning
(5)
Programme management and project evaluation:
Programme Management, Managing resources within programme, Strategic programme
management, Aids to programme management, Evaluation / Assessment of projects, Cost-benefit
Analysis, Cash flow forecasting, Cost-benefit evaluation techniques, Risk evaluation
Project approach and Software effort estimation:
Selection of an appropriate project technology, Choice of process model, Data Structure, Delivery
Model, Basis for software estimation, Problem with over and under estimates, Estimation
Techniques, Expert judgment, Albrecht Function Point Analysis, Function points Mark II, COSMIC
Function point, COCOMO Model
(8)
(10)
SECTION – B
Activity Planning:
Objective of Planning, Project Schedule, Activities – Sequencing and Scheduling, Development of
Project Network, Time Estimation, Forward and backward Pass, Critical Path and Activities.
(5)
Risk Management:
Risk, Risk categories, identification, assessment, planning, management PERT and CPM Models,
Monte Carlo Simulation
Resource Allocation, Monitoring and Control:
Resources, Nature of Resources, Resource Requirement, Scheduling, Counting and Costing,
Monitoring Framework, Cost Monitoring, Earned Value Analysis, Project targets, Change Control
Management
Managing people and Organizing teams:
Management Spectrum, Associating human resource with job, Motivation, Oldham- job
Characteristics Model, Decision Making, Leadership, Stress, Health and Safety
(5)
(6)
(6)
Text Book:
1.
Bob Hughes & Mike Cotterell
:
Software Project Management, 4th , Tata McGraw Hill
Publication
References:
1.
Prasanna Chandra
:
Projects – Panning, Analysis, Selection, Financing,
Implementation and Review, 6th , Tata McGraw Hill
Publication
2.
Jeffrey Pinto
:
Project Management, Pearson Publications
BUSINESS PROCESS REENGINEERING
Paper Code: CSE 8307
L T P: 4 0 0
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions atleast two questions from each section.
Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students should be able:
• To use information technology (IT) for redesigning business processes and organizations
• To understand the assumptions embedded in changing business with IT
• To evaluate problems in the planning and implementation of organizational change
• To assess the relationship of process reengineering to other initiatives to improve the performance of
organizations
• To evaluate a variety of approaches to using IT to improve organizations
• To understand the behavioral and political issues surrounding the use of IT in organizational change.
SECTION – A
Introduction:
Definition of Business Process Reengineering
(5 hrs)
Implementation of Business Process Reengineering:
Development of Process Objectives, Identification of Processes to be reengineered, Measurement of
existing Processes, Utilization of Information Technology, Design and Evaluation of Process
Prototypes
(10 hrs)
The Reengineering Structure:
The Business Process Reengineering Leader, The Process Owner, The Reengineering Teams, Other
Employees involved
(10 hrs)
SECTION – B
Change Management as an Enabler of Business Process Reengineering :
Why Change Management?, Nature of Change, Process of Change, Roles of Change, Resistance to
Change, Commitment to Change ,Culture and Change, Resilience and Change
(10 hrs)
Common Mistakes in Business Process Reengineering:
Reengineering too many Processes, Inadequate Training of Process Owners and Team Members,
Improper Monitoring, Wastage of Time, Delay in Showing Results, Discontinuance after
Achievement
(10 hrs)
Text Book:
1.
B.R. Dey
:
Business Process reengineering and change
management, Wiley
References:
1.
Jennifer Joksch
:
Business Process Reengineering and the important Role
of Change Management
2.
Vikram Sethi, William King
:
Organizational Transformation Through Business
Process Reengineering : Applying Lessons Learned,
Pearson Education
TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT
Paper Code: CSE 8308
L T P: 4 0 0
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions atleast two questions from each section.
Objectives: To make the students aware of latest techniques for managing the upcoming technologies in the software
field.
SECTION – A
Introduction to Technology Management :
Business Strategy for New Technologies: Adding value, Gaining competitive advantage, Timing and
capability development.
(8 hrs)
Technology Forecasting
Techniques of Forecasting, Technology Forecasting alliance and Relevance strategic Practicality
and Technology transfer.
(8 hrs)
Management of Research, Development and Innovation
Technology mapping, Comparison of types of R&D projects and development approaches - radical
platform and Incremental projects, Innovation process. Management of Intellectual Property Rights
Strategic value of patents, Trade secrets and licensing
(9 hrs)
SECTION – B
Managing Scientist and Technologists
Identification, Recruitment, Retention, Team work and Result orientation. Investment in Technology
Management roles and skills for New Technology
Technology for managerial productivity and Effectiveness, Just in time
Venture capital and Technology development
(20 hrs)
Text Book:
1.
John Humbleton Elsevier,
:
Management of High Technology Research and
Development.
References:
1. Charles W.L. HiIVGareth R. Jones : Strategic Management, Houghton Mifflin Co.
2.
S.A. Bergn : R&D Management, Basil Blackwell Inc.,
3. Richard M. Burton & Borge Obel Elsevier : Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Organizations.
4. Spyros Maksidakis & Steven C. Wheelwright : The Handbook of Forecasting - A Management Guide,
John Wiley & Sons
5. C. Marie Crawford : New Product Management, IR WIN, USA
6. David Hutchin : Just-in-Time, Gower Technical Press
7. : Technology and Management, Cassell Educational
Ltd., London
HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT & TRAINING METHODS
Paper Code: CSE 8309
L T P: 4 0 0
Max. Marks (Final Exam): 100
Max. Marks (Sessional Exam): 50
Time: 3 Hours
Total Lectures: 45
Note: Examiner shall set eight questions covering four questions from each section. Candidate will be required to
attempt five questions atleast two questions from each section.
Objectives: This course will provide students with an understanding of human development as a continual process,
with an ongoing requirement of adapting and adjusting to the environment. The course will also assist students in
developing a practical understanding of the process of human development.
SECTION – A
Introduction to Human Resource Development:
Evolution , Mission and Purpose Components of HRD , HRD problems and issues related to Indian
Industry and technical education , HRD in the context of new Industrial Policy
(6 hrs)
Staff Development, Professional Development and Career Development :
Stages of HRD , Initial or Induction Training , Training for job-related/professional development ,
Training for horizontal and vertical mobility of employees
(6 hrs)
Concept of Training :
Assumptions for prevailing and alternative concept of training, action through training or action
through force.
(5 hrs)
Training Strategy :
Strategic issues; Basic phases; Modalities in training; formulating a coherent strategy.
(5 hrs)
SECTION – B
Training Methods:
Learning on the job - Training in the fields, Simulating real life - role playing and games,
Incidents and cases - Individualized training, Seminars and syndicates; Lecture method
(6 hrs)
Developing Group and the Climate :
The Social process; Indicators of group development; training climate
(5 hrs)
Evaluation of Training:
Issues for evaluations; Role of the Training System with evaluators from other constituencies
(6 hrs)
Systems Approach to HRD:
Definition and importance of needs assessment, methods employed in needs assessment,
(Interviews, Questionnaire, Tests, Records and Reports Study, Job Analysis and
Performance Reviews) , strategies for HRD: on the job, off the job, Programme Planning,
Design, Implementation and Evaluation .
(6 hrs)
Text Book:
1.
JW Gilley and SA Eggland
:
Principles of Human Resource Development
References:
1. PP Arya and BB Tandon : Human Resource Development
2.
RF Mayer and Peter Pipe : HRD Training and Development

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